Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > EcoModding Central
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-03-2014, 09:39 PM   #101 (permalink)
performance with economy
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: melbourne Australia
Posts: 27
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Maybe you could re-route your EGR pipe and use it for an exhaust gas/heat source, first through a coarse filter to catch some of the particulate matter, then through a pipe in pipe heat exchanger, then back into the exhaust system...

  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 10-05-2014, 01:08 AM   #102 (permalink)
rh0
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: The u.p. of MI
Posts: 8
Thanks: 2
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Have you considered routing coolant from the heater core? This could eliminate the need for an additional thermostat, but would require you to open the valve manually (adjust the cabin vent temp. setting) once the engine warmed up.

I'll also recommend Evans coolant, especially if you plan on exposing your coolant to exhaust temperatures.

And if you want to get really experimental you could consider building a heat pipe

Your project looks fun and I'm looking forward to seeing what you do with it
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2014, 04:59 AM   #103 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: France - Paris
Posts: 762

la_voiture_de_courses - '03 Renault Megane Estate
OldContinents
90 day: 44.34 mpg (US)

xiao lan - '01 Audi A2
90 day: 38.88 mpg (US)

Brit iron - '92 Mini Mini
90 day: 45.5 mpg (US)

Prius - '09 Toyota PRIUS Lounge
90 day: 47.37 mpg (US)

Beemer - '06 BMW F800 ST
90 day: 53.06 mpg (US)
Thanks: 188
Thanked 33 Times in 30 Posts
I have to admit I am interested in using exhaust heat.

So how would you guys do it ?
I think copper tube rounded around exhaust tube and held in place with some exhaust insulating wrap.
Then use thermosiphon principle : heat goes up and does the flow in the system.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2014, 07:08 AM   #104 (permalink)
performance with economy
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: melbourne Australia
Posts: 27
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by renault_megane_dci View Post
I have to admit I am interested in using exhaust heat.

So how would you guys do it ?
I think copper tube rounded around exhaust tube and held in place with some exhaust insulating wrap.
Then use thermosiphon principle : heat goes up and does the flow in the system.
Exhaust temps would most likely climb too high for this type of system, boiling the water to steam, I foresee extremely high pressure in the coolant side of the exchanger. You would need a way to stop the exhaust adding heat once the engine was warmed up, otherwise a cooked engine is on the cards. Something similar to an egr valve is what I was thinking, which would enable you to switch the exhaust heat off when not needed.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2014, 07:48 AM   #105 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: France - Paris
Posts: 762

la_voiture_de_courses - '03 Renault Megane Estate
OldContinents
90 day: 44.34 mpg (US)

xiao lan - '01 Audi A2
90 day: 38.88 mpg (US)

Brit iron - '92 Mini Mini
90 day: 45.5 mpg (US)

Prius - '09 Toyota PRIUS Lounge
90 day: 47.37 mpg (US)

Beemer - '06 BMW F800 ST
90 day: 53.06 mpg (US)
Thanks: 188
Thanked 33 Times in 30 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by blownoiler View Post
Exhaust temps would most likely climb too high for this type of system, boiling the water to steam, I foresee extremely high pressure in the coolant side of the exchanger. You would need a way to stop the exhaust adding heat once the engine was warmed up, otherwise a cooked engine is on the cards. Something similar to an egr valve is what I was thinking, which would enable you to switch the exhaust heat off when not needed.
IIRC BWM added some kind of steam engine on their transmission shaft not so long ago to use that exhaust heat.

Will try and gather info on this.
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2014, 03:42 PM   #106 (permalink)
V8 guy
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 4,972

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)
Thanks: 104
Thanked 1,163 Times in 855 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by renault_megane_dci View Post
I have to admit I am interested in using exhaust heat.

So how would you guys do it ?
I think copper tube rounded around exhaust tube and held in place with some exhaust insulating wrap.
Then use thermosiphon principle : heat goes up and does the flow in the system.
fast warm up ideas: Exhaust heat exchanger

Quote:
Originally Posted by blownoiler View Post
Exhaust temps would most likely climb too high for this type of system, boiling the water to steam, I foresee extremely high pressure in the coolant side of the exchanger. You would need a way to stop the exhaust adding heat once the engine was warmed up, otherwise a cooked engine is on the cards. Something similar to an egr valve is what I was thinking, which would enable you to switch the exhaust heat off when not needed.
Don't use an EGR valve, they only flow a tiny volume of exhaust.
If you are going to do this, go big, use all or most of your vehicles exhaust to heat coolant.
Use an EGR cooler like in my above post and an exhaust butter fly valve. I have several exhaust valves in my junk collection every thing from 100% cast iron GM 1980s junk to very high end fully CNC machined stainless steel exhaust butter fly valves used on motor cycles that are only a few years old.

Quote:
Originally Posted by renault_megane_dci View Post
IIRC BWM added some kind of steam engine on their transmission shaft not so long ago to use that exhaust heat.

Will try and gather info on this.
Classical boiler design tells us we need about 10 to 12 square feet of boiler surface area for each Horsepower we want to produce. Classic boiler design assumes a differential temperature much higher than what you will get in a vehicle exhaust. So the heat exchanger surface area per Hp gets even bigger. A lot bigger.

It could work if you are a mechanical engineer who used to build boilers. Most of us are better off just repurposing a big diesel EGR cooler and exhaust butterfly valve for use on a car to create unbelievably fast warm ups in cold weather.
Then pipe the heated coolant to which ever system you would like to heat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rh0 View Post
I'll also recommend Evans coolant, especially if you plan on exposing your coolant to exhaust temperatures.
Just about every single diesel engine made since YM2007.5 has coolant and exhaust interfacing in a heat exchanger and the factory fill coolant isn't the problem.
__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, corvette gen 5 front brakes, 1LE drive shaft, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.

Last edited by oil pan 4; 10-08-2014 at 04:12 PM..
  Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to oil pan 4 For This Useful Post:
renault_megane_dci (10-08-2014)
Old 10-24-2014, 11:50 AM   #107 (permalink)
Tinkerer
 
kafer65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 274

Silver - '15 Mazda CX-5 Sport
Team Mazda
90 day: 37.23 mpg (US)
Thanks: 7
Thanked 60 Times in 52 Posts
My engine oil would barely reach 160 F in round trips that were 15-20 miles in the summer with my aircooled Beetle. It has an oil cooler with air running through it all the time that the engine is on, but it also has a turbo that is sending a trickle of real hot oil back to the sump. Also had over 5 qrts if oil and external oil filter in play as well. Unless I'm revving a lot down the highway for any decent amount of time and I'm only running 50 mph down secondary roads at most it doesn't get warm. I've seen it at 260 at 3800rpm on a 100 degree day after some time on the highway. Very interesting thread.
__________________


Mirror deletes, 80% grill blocks, wheel covers, 50 psi tires = 6% better MPG avg. over a year. Wheel skirts overcoming ethanol winter fuel mpg losses and more!
http://ecomodder.com/forum/showthrea...ead-30641.html
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2014, 03:20 PM   #108 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: France - Paris
Posts: 762

la_voiture_de_courses - '03 Renault Megane Estate
OldContinents
90 day: 44.34 mpg (US)

xiao lan - '01 Audi A2
90 day: 38.88 mpg (US)

Brit iron - '92 Mini Mini
90 day: 45.5 mpg (US)

Prius - '09 Toyota PRIUS Lounge
90 day: 47.37 mpg (US)

Beemer - '06 BMW F800 ST
90 day: 53.06 mpg (US)
Thanks: 188
Thanked 33 Times in 30 Posts
Hey KAFER65,

Your Beetle doesn't quite fall in the FE champion category but too low an oil temp can be detrimental to power too ...
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2014, 12:26 PM   #109 (permalink)
Tinkerer
 
kafer65's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 274

Silver - '15 Mazda CX-5 Sport
Team Mazda
90 day: 37.23 mpg (US)
Thanks: 7
Thanked 60 Times in 52 Posts
Yeah, its not right. I had hoped the EFI would help but its too simple. I need EFI to control timing, and fuel where I can precisely adjust it. It should be getting about 35 mpg with the turbo. I can't afford to change it now and its only getting about 19 mpg with the roof rack. It runs super fat off boost and way lean on boost
__________________


Mirror deletes, 80% grill blocks, wheel covers, 50 psi tires = 6% better MPG avg. over a year. Wheel skirts overcoming ethanol winter fuel mpg losses and more!
http://ecomodder.com/forum/showthrea...ead-30641.html
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2014, 02:08 PM   #110 (permalink)
.........................
 
darcane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Buckley, WA
Posts: 1,563

Ninja 650R - '06 Kawasaki Ninja 650R
90 day: 52.02 mpg (US)

B*tch - '01 Honda Civic HX
Team Honda
90 day: 38.09 mpg (US)

Ms. Hyde - '06 Cadillac CTS V
Sports Cars
90 day: 16.93 mpg (US)
Thanks: 363
Thanked 467 Times in 302 Posts
Maybe a simple solution:
Have you guys seen this yet?

Adapt one of those to heat your tranny fluid.

__________________
CTS-V


Past Cars:
2001 Civic HX Mods

2003 Silverado Mods
  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com