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Old 01-08-2018, 08:13 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecoromer View Post
I think I've seen photos of that vehicle. Yes, there are some similarities, especially being a smaller vehicle. Very clever pop-up in the sleeping area on that one!
All I remember is that it was converted by a German company.

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Old 01-09-2018, 01:22 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Here's what I'd do, hard top and sides with no canvas....cuz, bears. Plus durability issues with canvas. The 5 sloped top is all it takes drop drag to near ideal and reduce the Lift Coefficient to ideal. The bottom has some odd angles but nothing really different than what you originally planned. The tops curved section is challenge perhaps.

I figure a flange on the bottom shell exterior that the top rests on when lowered, if the geometry is done right, the front could be lifted and locked in place then the rear so it could be done manually for simplicity.

The height is similar to yours, except a bit taller in back when raised.

Just a rough draft, we can talk more if this seems doable.



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Old 01-10-2018, 12:18 PM   #13 (permalink)
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I like to think that I have a small footprint, having lived out of this vehicle for the past five years. It's also been long enough that I have a better idea of when to compromise. Most importantly it feels and functions like home while exploring. If I'm able to improve its drivability and fuel economy, even better.

ChazInMT:

That design is very similar to the XP Camper. It's been receiving a lot of positive feedback. I think it's a great design, and I expect it to be especially storm proof. However, the design forces the door to be in the rear, which in my opinion messes up the floor plan. I'd initially contemplated going with that type of design but ultimately ruled it out. The 5 slope on the roof I may be able to incorporate though. I'll look into that more. Thanks for taking the time to draw up those sketches!
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Old 01-10-2018, 12:24 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Oh, and I tried good street tires but got stuck more times than I'd like to admit. I then went tall and skinny, eventually settling on 255/85r16 M/S tires. I don't get stuck any more
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Old 01-10-2018, 12:58 PM   #15 (permalink)
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I love this idea! I'm going to be following this thread.

I'm also building an overland rig (an XJ) and trying to keep it aerodynamically friendly - which flies in the face of all overland mods which are mostly added on exterior protrusions such as flood lights, air intake snorkles, roof racks, tire carriers, etc.
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Old 01-10-2018, 01:02 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Also, it seems to me that these overland camper shells are not ideal

* they raise the center of gravity considerably. Off-camber situations and hill climbs are much much more dangerous
* they drag you down on the highway, as discussed here
* they're expensive yet they seem to break a lot, especially when pitched in high wind areas

Yet they're very popular with the overland crowd. You don't want to be the guy without one that has to pitch and tear down a normal tent while everyone else can do it in seconds!
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Old 01-10-2018, 01:13 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mannydantyla View Post
You don't want to be the guy without one that has to pitch and tear down a normal tent while everyone else can do it in seconds!
How funny! That's how I spend the working part of my year, walking, pooping in holes, and setting up tents. You're better than me if you can do it in seconds
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Old 01-10-2018, 06:07 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ecoromer View Post
How funny! That's how I spend the working part of my year, walking, pooping in holes, and setting up tents. You're better than me if you can do it in seconds
So you use the vehicle to work? Then it makes even more sense to build that camper setup, since enhanced comfort in your resting stops might also increase your productivity.
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Old 01-10-2018, 06:22 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Quote:
I like to think that I have a small footprint, having lived out of this vehicle for the past five years.
[snip]
However, the design forces the door to be in the rear, which in my opinion messes up the floor plan.
This appears to be new information. There is an existing body?

What is the floor plan you intend? What's on the back wall?

Quote:
Originally Posted by myself
What is the purpose of the detail in the frame rail between the bumper and rear tire? It looks like a dump-bed hinge.
Still wondering.
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Old 01-13-2018, 01:09 PM   #20 (permalink)
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what/why

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecoromer View Post
Seeking wisdom from the experts over here.

I'm in the final design phase of an overland camper build. I have a design that I feel is structurally, mechanically, and ergonomically well put together. And while the vehicle has been built to travel anywhere, it still spends most of its miles on long stretches of highway. And so, I feel it's important that it's not shaped like a box

I've played with overlaying a variety of streamlining templates over the model, scoured the webs for similar shaped vehicles in wind tunnels, and tinkered with the overall shape until it stopped being ergonomic.

The vehicle is driven between 50-65mph, normally a few hundred miles at a time.

My research points toward the most gains from:
  1. Fairings between cab and camper
  2. Arched roof
  3. Modified boattail

The dry weight of the box will be comparatively light, less than 800lbs. The entire structure is constructed of fiberglass reinforced panels (FRP), foam for the exterior and PP honeycomb for the interior. Similar construction methodology to many boats.

And so, studying the attached model, what would you do and why?
*For their 'Bat Truck' 18-wheeler,and 'Shoebox' Ford Econoline-based van streamlining,NASA chose leading-edge radii equal to 20% of the vehicle width.
*They brought the sides down level with the belly.
*They did a full belly pan.
*This got them from Cd 0.89,to 0.347.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
*With their truncated boat tail,she went to Cd 0.242.
Out in the boondocks,I don't know what you can get away with,clearance wise.The NASA numbers would give you a sense of what's doable.
*You might have to cantelever the 'nose' of the camper beyond the cab a bit,use the bottom of it as a splitter,to direct the flow down there to the sides as you see in some commercial box truck applications.
*Wraparound front airdam to properly get flow onto the new 'sides' of the rig.

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