Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > General Efficiency Discussion
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-12-2017, 12:20 AM   #1 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 177

Delivery 'Boy - '86 Suzuki Mighty Boy
90 day: 37.15 mpg (US)

SkipSwift - '13 Suzuki Swift GL
90 day: 35.44 mpg (US)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 33 Times in 27 Posts
How much effect do ecomods have around town?

Ok, so I have a Toyota Echo. For those unfamiliar (...how...?) it's an 850kg (not willing to make it any lighter, I use everything installed in the car semi-regularly and I don't want to increase noise), reasonably aero (Cd 0.3) hatch with a moderate sized (1.3-1.5L) 4-valve engine that has sequential injection and variable inlet cam timing. My particular model is a 1.3L manual 3-door with no options except A/C, I even have manual steering, manual mirrors, and locking.

I live in a warm climate, with a typical max speed of around 60km/h, I think I average about 30km/h on my 8km commutes (traffic is fairly light).

I already run LRR tyres at 38psi and employ mild hypermiling techniques (driving with load, high gear fuel cut coasting, minimal braking). I have no desire to run kill switches, but I do key-off at long lights.

Currently I have a faulty thermostat and run the AC during the day so I'm at about 6.0-6.5l/100km around town. I would expect that to improve to 6l/100km regularly once the thermostat is replaced (car still warms up, but at night without a/c on when I get all the lights home it can take about 5-6km).

How much gain would you expect from the various eco-mods given that most of them are aero-based?

__________________







Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazyrabbit
In God we trust. All others: bring data
  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 09-12-2017, 12:33 AM   #2 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
vskid3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Utah
Posts: 821

Civic DX (sold) - '97 Honda Civic DX
90 day: 34.15 mpg (US)

GTO (sold) - '04 Pontiac GTO
90 day: 22.62 mpg (US)

Green Brick (sold) - '06 Ford Escape Hybrid
90 day: 31.93 mpg (US)
Thanks: 143
Thanked 217 Times in 161 Posts
I think your biggest limiter will be not doing a kill switch with how short and low speed your commute is. Aeromods won't help much. You could probably pump up your tires a little more. Technique and driving style will be your money makers. Just because you're doing certain driving techniques doesn't mean you're getting the most out of them or using the right one at the right time.

Do you have any instrumentation? That will help you a lot in determining what's working best for you.
__________________
Current cars:

Prius Thread

Volt Thread


E-Bike Thread
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 12:42 AM   #3 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 177

Delivery 'Boy - '86 Suzuki Mighty Boy
90 day: 37.15 mpg (US)

SkipSwift - '13 Suzuki Swift GL
90 day: 35.44 mpg (US)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 33 Times in 27 Posts
No instrumentation, though I can reliably feel the fuel cut points, so I've just been driving at high loads in the highest gear I can for any given situation. Typically this results in about half to three-quarter throttle with up shifting at 2000-3500 depending on the acceleration needed. Sometime I'm in top gear at 45km/h (I skip gears, can't remember when I last used fourth on the flat)
__________________







Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazyrabbit
In God we trust. All others: bring data
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 07:45 AM   #4 (permalink)
Custom User Title
 
Gasoline Fumes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York State
Posts: 996

Nut Wagon - '91 Honda Civic Wagon DX
Team Honda
Wagons
90 day: 71.93 mpg (US)

CRXFi - '88 Honda CRX XFi
Thanks: 416
Thanked 418 Times in 236 Posts
Things I would try:

Higher tire pressure - maybe try 45 PSI?

Block heater - I use mine all year

Disable the alternator - charge your battery at home every night, maybe add a solar charger

Make sure your brakes have minimal drag

Zero-toe alignment

0w-20 engine oil

Engine-off neutral coasting will be better than high gear fuel cut coasting - compression braking is still braking
__________________
Best tank with the Honda so far is 81 MPG.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 08:35 AM   #5 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Australia
Posts: 177

Delivery 'Boy - '86 Suzuki Mighty Boy
90 day: 37.15 mpg (US)

SkipSwift - '13 Suzuki Swift GL
90 day: 35.44 mpg (US)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 33 Times in 27 Posts
I refuse to use pulse & glide with engine off cruise on principle of safety.

I don't think the block heater will help. Certainly the effect of the thermostat will be much more. The normal 'cold' start here occurs somewhere between 20 and 30 degrees Celsius. Once the coolant was already on the gauge, which I later discovered was 55 degrees.

How much gain would you expect to be between the tyre pressure, zero toe, and thinner oil? (Not interested in alternator delete for a wide variety of reason)

Would there be much gain in changing the gear oil? I used to run lightweight engine oil in one of the race-car gearboxes, and one of my other cars ran DXIII from the factory
__________________







Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazyrabbit
In God we trust. All others: bring data
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 09:40 AM   #6 (permalink)
Batman Junior
 
MetroMPG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: 1000 Islands, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 19,512

Blackfly - '98 Geo Metro
Team Metro
90 day: 70.72 mpg (US)

ForkenSwift - '92 Geo Metro EV
Last 3: 95.68 mpg (US)

MPGiata - '90 Mazda Miata
90 day: 46.56 mpg (US)
Thanks: 2,082
Thanked 4,803 Times in 2,414 Posts
I would argue that instrumentation would be your biggest potential gain.

People overestimate how efficiently they're driving until presented with the cold hard instantaneous facts.

"I wish I hadn't waited so long to get one" is a common sentiment read around here.
__________________
Latest mods test: 15 mods = 15% MPG improvement: A-B test, 2007 Honda Civic 1.8L, 5-speed
Ecodriving test:
Manual vs. automatic transmission MPG showdown: Nissan Micra 1.6L



EcoModder
has launched a forum for the efficient new Mitsubishi Mirage
www.MetroMPG.com - fuel efficiency info for Geo Metro owners
www.ForkenSwift.com - electric car conversion on a beer budget
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2017, 10:46 AM   #7 (permalink)
Rat Racer
 
Fat Charlie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Route 16
Posts: 2,881

Al the Third, year four - '13 Honda Fit Base
Team Honda
90 day: 44.59 mpg (US)
Thanks: 919
Thanked 1,069 Times in 698 Posts
EOC has as much to do with safety as airport "security" theater does.

If you've got an anchormatic, have leaky brakes or are driving something too big to handle without power steering, your first real step is to fix those problems. If not, EOC is just as safe as everything else you do while driving: you can be safe or unsafe and it's all up to you.

But more important than any technique is good instrumentation.
__________________

Quote:
Originally Posted by sheepdog44 View Post
Transmission type Efficiency
Manual neutral engine off.100% @MPG <----- Fun Fact.
Manual 1:1 gear ratio .......98%
CVT belt ............................88%
Automatic .........................86%

  Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Fat Charlie For This Useful Post:
MetroMPG (09-12-2017), Xist (09-12-2017)
Old 09-19-2017, 04:37 PM   #8 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Western Canada
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The easiest and most effective ways to get good mileage at low speed city driving speeds are, more or less in order:
1. Driving style (limiting idling & braking, accelerating properly)
2. Low-RR Tires at highish pressure (Low-RR tire design is more important than pressure.)
3. Keeping heat in the engine (block heater, insulation, grill block)
4. Aero Mods
5. Car Weight Reduction (at least as effective as low-RR tires, but achieving a meaningful reduction in weight is difficult, which is why I place it last)

As for aero mods, you can play around with the Aero Calculator floating around (I'm not allowed to link anything yet) to see how much your aero losses are at the speeds you normally drive at. For a typical car, it might be a 50/50 split of aero/rolling resistance at about 50km/h (ignoring idling, braking), so if you're hitting these speeds or higher, aero mods should help a fair bit.

If you have a way to keep track of your coolant temperatures and radiator fan use accurately, you could install a partial grill block that will help with both aero and warmup. It's the low hanging fruit of aero mods. Even in a warmer climate you probably have more cooling airflow than you need. I blocked over half of my grills and my coolant temps are just fine in 22C ambient temps (haven't tested in higher ambient temps than this yet).
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2017, 05:29 PM   #9 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
freebeard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: northwest of normal
Posts: 8,386
Thanks: 1,803
Thanked 2,784 Times in 2,173 Posts
Quote:
I don't think the block heater will help.
8 clicks? You need a bigger block heater.

One that heats the transmission too.

  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com