Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > EcoModding Central
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-07-2017, 10:41 PM   #21 (permalink)
CruzeMTgrind
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 123

BlueBawls - '14 Chevrolet Cruze Eco
90 day: 47.71 mpg (US)

Eddie - '02 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer
90 day: 25.53 mpg (US)
Thanks: 52
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
I'm not quite as mechanically inclined as the majority of you guys on here. For me replacing the diff pinion seal was enough of a task. So tranny swap probably out of the question for my limited ability. Always learning more though. The coil spring I will probably try pucking otherwise junkyard pull like you stated.

  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 09-16-2017, 08:37 PM   #22 (permalink)
CruzeMTgrind
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 123

BlueBawls - '14 Chevrolet Cruze Eco
90 day: 47.71 mpg (US)

Eddie - '02 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer
90 day: 25.53 mpg (US)
Thanks: 52
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Just had what I would call a record trip. If mpg display on dash is going to be consistent at 2+ mpg low like last tank trip from cold start was 30+ mpg. Previous tank at 27.6 the dic was reading 24.7 for the full tank. Hoping that will hold true. 30 mpg explorers are rare lol
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2017, 07:07 PM   #23 (permalink)
Lurking Eco-wall-o-texter
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: MPLS, MN area
Posts: 73
Thanks: 0
Thanked 44 Times in 31 Posts
Unhappy Argh, more coolant leaks.

30mpg is really good! I still need to get a feedback device.

Me, I finally installed the front shocks and swaybar end links I bought a while back. In the process, I found that I've got more coolant leaks.

Passenger side looks like timing cover gasket. Dribbled down block and made a nice perfect little droplet on the end of that corner oil pan bolt. Driver side I can't tell as well - could be timing cover, could be water pump. Also making a droplet on an oil pan bolt.

Both could also be head gasket or lower intake manifold gasket, hard to tell, won't have a good chance to check from cold start until next weekend. Odd thing was, truck was dry when I parked it in the garage - but when I cranked the engine and ran it just long enough to turn the wheels to one side so I could get tools in better, I saw the leak. At least it isn't using much.

(I can't turn the wheels without the engine running or the power steering gets VERY unhappy and will randomly throw a death-wobble tantrum until the air is all bled out. Something to do with the Explorer power steering rack design.)

Poked at the rear O2 sensor wiring - found a frayed spot in the sheath over the wires, but nothing busted or cut. Couldn't find a worn spot in the wire insulation itself, either. Unplugged and replugged the harness, but haven't checked to see if it has woken up from previous constant 0.0V output yet.

At least the truck doesn't do the "bouncy, bouncy, bouncy" bad shocks thing over large bumps anymore.

Thinking real hard about using Bar's Leaks' "Head Gasket Repair" on this thing. Requires draining, flushing, filling with the stuff + water, bleeding out the air, going through a few heat cycles, then drain, flush and re-fill with coolant. Anybody have any experience with this stuff? It isn't the "drop in" stuff, so no major particulates or sludge-generators, but pretty much the highest concentration of sodium silicate you can get off the shelf unless you search out pure stuff. $12 or so, too, so not very expensive like some of the other brands.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2017, 09:00 PM   #24 (permalink)
CruzeMTgrind
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 123

BlueBawls - '14 Chevrolet Cruze Eco
90 day: 47.71 mpg (US)

Eddie - '02 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer
90 day: 25.53 mpg (US)
Thanks: 52
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Can't help in regards to the head gasket patch kit. Don't know anyone who has tried it. Hope someone can chime in and give u advice on it. I would say don't go cheap on it and look into the product as much as u can. Someone has to have some diy out there or words of wisdom. Glad ur suspension troubles are over though. Mine still needs some TLC from a wrench or 2. In regard to mpg I'm looking to try something I read earlier. Another X guy reported adjusting the parking brake out gained nearly 1 mpg over the course of 5 tanks after the adjustment. Worth a shot it's a pretty simple job from the looks of it.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2017, 10:21 PM   #25 (permalink)
Ecomuggler
 
Xist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 5,285

Chorizo - '00 Honda Civic HX, baby! :D
90 day: 40.43 mpg (US)

Mid-Life Crisis Fighter - '99 Honda Accord LX
90 day: 33.7 mpg (US)
Thanks: 3,196
Thanked 892 Times in 666 Posts
Shouty Kilmore has several videos promoting stop leak products. Eric the Car Guy has one showing what happened when a customer tried it. It still needed a head gasket replacement, but now it needed the rest of the system replaced.

Some people swear by them, or insist one is good, but the rest are bad, but regardless of how closely you follow the directions, if it does not work, they insist you did not follow the directions.

I replaced the head gasket on my Forester. It was a pain, but I knew it would work right afterward. It cost me $500 in parts and tools.

There is much more evidence that it will do damage than there is that it will help.
  Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Xist For This Useful Post:
14'ecocruze (09-19-2017)
Old 09-19-2017, 11:54 PM   #26 (permalink)
Lurking Eco-wall-o-texter
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: MPLS, MN area
Posts: 73
Thanks: 0
Thanked 44 Times in 31 Posts
Well, I did at least do a compression check on cylinder 3. 150 psi cold, throttle shut, all other plugs still in. So the bore is probably still good, meaning it is likely a solid short block. Set of heads is $560, bolts and gaskets another $200, rocker arms and pushrods another $250, water pump since it has to come off, oil pump since I ought to drop the pan getting into it this far, etc.

I just need to go over the prices and figure out whether it's worth it to me (not on paper - this truck is worth maybe $500 since it has already been totaled) to fix it right, or to swap in a newer engine, just drive it, or just get something else. Honestly not sure what I want to do with it. Going to do something about the rear O2 sensor next, maybe try and find the evap system leak.

The real problem is likely something along the lines of "it isn't an FJ-40, but those don't have crumple zones, they cost 10x what they used to, and I've got a family depending on me." Adulting is hard sometimes.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2017, 09:16 AM   #27 (permalink)
V8 guy
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 4,972

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)
Thanks: 104
Thanked 1,163 Times in 855 Posts
Head gasket patch is what you use to get the vehicle sold.
They don't work.
It's more of a temporarily repair till you can get it fixed right. This head gasket rear stuff doesn't stop the leak, it just slows it down.

Not fixing a bad head gasket as soon as possible will lead to cylinder wash down with coolant, which will taper it, then after you fix it you will be burning oil.
__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, corvette gen 5 front brakes, 1LE drive shaft, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2017, 11:58 AM   #28 (permalink)
Ecomuggler
 
Xist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Mesa, AZ
Posts: 5,285

Chorizo - '00 Honda Civic HX, baby! :D
90 day: 40.43 mpg (US)

Mid-Life Crisis Fighter - '99 Honda Accord LX
90 day: 33.7 mpg (US)
Thanks: 3,196
Thanked 892 Times in 666 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by cajunfj40 View Post
Adulting is hard sometimes.
Indeed!
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2017, 06:39 PM   #29 (permalink)
Lurking Eco-wall-o-texter
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: MPLS, MN area
Posts: 73
Thanks: 0
Thanked 44 Times in 31 Posts
Leak down tests are not easy on an Explorer.

Hello oil pan 4,

Quote:
Head gasket patch is what you use to get the vehicle sold.
They don't work.
It's more of a temporarily repair till you can get it fixed right. This head gasket rear stuff doesn't stop the leak, it just slows it down.
I'm thinking of it more for a cracked head vs. a blown head gasket. These Cologne OHV v-6's are apparently prone to cracking the heads (though less so on these last few years), causing coolant leaking into the combustion chamber. Symptoms are the same as a blown head gasket in that cylinder, except without the oil/coolant mix. With the other coolant leaks, there's more going on than just a crack, so I need to pull the head for sure. Any idea how much of a mess the sodium-silicate "water glass" based head gasket fix products make for the guy replacing the gaskets after it has been used? Not the drop-in stop leak goop, the stuff you have to do with water only, then flush out and replace with coolant after 2 heat cycles.

Quote:
Not fixing a bad head gasket as soon as possible will lead to cylinder wash down with coolant, which will taper it, then after you fix it you will be burning oil.
Yes, I need to fix it. Trying to figure out how much it needs so I can do the right repair at the least cost. Cost-effective, so to speak. Unfortunately there's no way to check for a cracked head until it is off, and I don't want to spend ~$500 on new heads if the short-block is bad, nor do I want to put shiny new heads on a leaky old short-block. Doing all that work and still having leaks would really make me mad.

So, still working on this thing. Drives nice when it isn't missing. Never overheats. Starts easy.

I tried to do a leak-down test this past weekend. Half a day spent swearing and getting bruised and scratched in the garage and no reliable results. I need to get at a minimum new o-rings for my cylinder adapter, as I strongly suspect I am not getting a decent seal there. The late-model 4.0 OHV Cologne V6 heads take a long-reach 14mm, with the threads in the bottom half of the well, so the regular adapter doesn't fit and my slightly longer one probably engages 2-3 turns at most.

I'll probably try picking up a spark-plug non-fouler to use as an intermediary. It will provide a taper-seat seal to the cylinder head, and an easily cleaned surface for the o-ring on the leak-down adapter to seal against. Then I can mark the harmonic balancer so I can get the engine on TDC properly for each cylinder's compression stroke. I know I got it close - I hooked up the adapter, put a longer hose on it, climbed under the truck, put a ratchet on the nose of the crank and turned it over until I felt/heard compression out the end of the hose. Then kept turning until I couldn't get more air to come out. Problem is, I believe it rotated backward until a valve opened whenever I tried to test it, because I got hissing out the intake at 15psi input on cylinders 1-3, all I had time to do. Gads is it painful to pull and replace plugs/plug wires on this engine! A/C reciever/dryer and lines plus heater lines and valve and blower housing on the passenger side, A/C lines and EGR lines/valve plus brake booster on the driver side.

Pretty sure I did confirm a connection between at least cylinder 3 and the water jacket. I built pressure in the system and pushed out at least a cup of fluid. No bubbles - just a bit of pressure release when pulling the cap and an "upwelling" of fluid.

After I ran out of time, I put the plug from Cylinder 4 into Cylinder 3 and put a new one in 4 while buttoning things up. I was just going to swap between 3 and 4 and see if the misfire moved with the plug from #3, but I preferred no miss (at least for a while) to a moved miss. Plugs look pretty evenly clean except #3, which is tannish/reddish. No fuzz, just colored. ~2,500-2,800 or so on the plugs. No oil-soaked plugs.

The possibility of a cracked head is worrying, mostly from the perspective of "if I plan to just swap the gaskets/head bolts and I find cracked head(s) I'm without a truck until I get un-cracked head(s) and find time to work on it again". Plus I can't replace the pan gasket with the engine in the truck unless I at least drop the front diff. I also don't want to put a bunch of new gaskets/new or rebuilt heads on a worn-out shortblock. Been pricing used engines locally. U-Pull is ~$260 with warranty, $160 without. Other pre-pulled yards are ~$300-$800 "ran good" or "tested" or "150 all" with 150-250k miles on them. Thinking about trying to get a shot at a decent shortblock I can tidy up in prep to swap in, and 2 more heads that might not be cracked. Any warrantied engine I get a chance to test at home and take back if it is "bad" beyond their warranty conditons.

Hard part is getting the heads crack-checked. Maybe I can get lucky and be able to pressure-test a used engine and it doesn't have blown head gaskets. I don't want to replace the head gaskets twice just to check for cracks, and if I take the heads in to get crack-checked, they need to be cleaned, and they ought to have the valves done, etc. and pretty soon why didn't I buy new heads?

This is an intentionally low-dollar vehicle. I'm paying myself in tools to the tune of what the labor estimates are to get various things done, it's the only way I can justify putting any money into it at all. It won't get a $1650+ remanufactured long block, that's for sure. A used "ok" engine, a good gasket set, pick-the-best of what I have for valvegear, manifolds and heads from the two engines, though? Maybe. Might even fool around with seeing if I can clearance an intake manifold to drop straight down over the cam sensor. Pain in the butt to have to drop it down to 1/4" off touching, then scooch it back 1/2", then drop it the rest of the way onto the thick beads of goop that seal the valley. Or use the cheaper 1-piece gasket that's got steel carriers.

Hard to justify much when there are less-rusty and more importantly less-totaled trucks out there for <$2,000. Sunk costs are going to eat me alive on this thing if I don't take a step back and make a plan. At least after the initial spend most of the cost has been tools I get to keep.

  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com