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Old 09-08-2017, 09:03 AM   #51 (permalink)
CFECO
 
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X-Car - '11 Homemade 2+2

Velbly1 - '17 Toyota Camery XSE
90 day: 29 mpg (US)

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Those look interesting, but look to be Samurais basically! The whole Light Jeep attraction is they fit in the back of our Tundrs pickup, and these bigger ones will not. So, if I cannot find what I need, I'll build it. I got another hour or so work done yesterday on the buggy. Built a jig to hold the front forks in place while I remove the head tubes to get the old frame pieces cut off, and new main frame sections welded on. Layed out where i need the cuts to be, and took the GC drive axle apart to see if the short and long sides are interchangeable... they seem to be! This is good... By 10:30 am it was 110 degrees in my little steel shed... nice!

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Old 09-08-2017, 11:47 PM   #52 (permalink)
It's all about Diesel
 
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Originally Posted by CFECO View Post
The whole Light Jeep attraction is they fit in the back of our Tundrs pickup, and these bigger ones will not.
That's a good point.


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So, if I cannot find what I need, I'll build it.
Sometimes I also get that willing to build a vehicle to match some very specific criteria, but now I'm more inclined toward building a tricycle for budget reasons and in case I eventually move to another country where I could have a hard time switching the driver's side.


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and took the GC drive axle apart to see if the short and long sides are interchangeable... they seem to be! This is good...
Weight and space savings? That sounds good. Maybe could turn into an excuse to not disconsiderate the repurposing of the GC brakes into a parking/emergency brake setup. Well, even if you resort to a single master-cylinder for the service brakes and some hydraulic valve to use it as a parking brake, having an all-mechanical emergency brake doesn't sound bad at all.
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Old 09-09-2017, 08:47 AM   #53 (permalink)
CFECO
 
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: Vail, AZ.
Posts: 550

X-Car - '11 Homemade 2+2

Velbly1 - '17 Toyota Camery XSE
90 day: 29 mpg (US)

Velbly2 - '13 Toyota Tundra
90 day: 18.03 mpg (US)
Thanks: 171
Thanked 60 Times in 56 Posts
Yes, the parking-emergency brake issue is a real one! The GC brakes would be the simplist answer, even though adding weight and complexity with added linkage. Shown is a hydraulic brake lock used as a parking brake on race cars that I was considering. It would do nothing for the E-Brake situation, but I have also never had any brake failures on the motorcycles I've had, and these two big motorcross bikes have some of the best brakes ever.
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Old 09-09-2017, 09:44 PM   #54 (permalink)
It's all about Diesel
 
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Yes, the parking-emergency brake issue is a real one! The GC brakes would be the simplist answer, even though adding weight and complexity with added linkage.
It turns out to be actually more complicated than it initially appeared, since it's likely that you'll retain the chain drive between the GC axle and the motorcycle wheels. In case of a chain rupture (even though it may be very unlikely), it would not be any effective as an emergency brake

BTW since you'd be supposed to run it on rough environmental conditions, I still believe you would benefit from full chain covers similar to the ones used in the classic Honda Super Cub. It not just protects the chain from eventual damage caused by debris but also keeps it lubricated more effectively thus saving oil/grease.


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I have also never had any brake failures on the motorcycles I've had
I have also never had any brake failure, not even on motorcycles with all-drum brakes. Well, all-drum brake setups for motorcycles are usually all-mechanical anyway...


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these two big motorcross bikes have some of the best brakes ever
I'm sure the lower load factor may turn out favorable to their efficiency in a motorcycle, while in a heavier 4-wheeled side-by-side ATV it becomes quite challenging.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:41 PM   #55 (permalink)
CFECO
 
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: Vail, AZ.
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X-Car - '11 Homemade 2+2

Velbly1 - '17 Toyota Camery XSE
90 day: 29 mpg (US)

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90 day: 18.03 mpg (US)
Thanks: 171
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Yes, to all you have said. Brake wise it would be more prudent I believe, to actually have two master cylinders, one front and one rear. Easy to adjust the F-R brake balance, and the parking brake valve is easy to install in the rear system. We have run these bikes in the most severe conditions without chain failures; deep sand, two feet of water, mud, rocks, and deep snow, without failure. They are very high tech, large chains built to take 70ish horsepower in racing conditions. And the weight.... I am keeping track of the bike chassis's weight, and everything I take off or add as it happens. I hope to keep it as close to the weight of the two motorcycles with riders after they are connected together. Weight is my enemy! I have gained about 250 lbs by getting rid of the two engines, the rear coilover shocks are 12 lbs ea, the frame sections are more weight, plus a couple of gas tanks full of gas. Lots of places to build light... we shall see!
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Old 09-13-2017, 08:16 AM   #56 (permalink)
It's all about Diesel
 
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We have run these bikes in the most severe conditions without chain failures; deep sand, two feet of water, mud, rocks, and deep snow, without failure. They are very high tech, large chains built to take 70ish horsepower in racing conditions.
Indeed, but anyway, chain cases do improve the reliability, which IMO would be a desirable feature in a vehicle meant for off-roading where a tow-truck could not be so easy to come at its rescue if anything fails

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