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Old 10-18-2017, 08:52 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Old 10-19-2017, 04:00 AM   #22 (permalink)
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_CR-X

One of these? It already has one.

Have you reverted the polyurethane bushings yet?

Determine the source Is it engine noise, transmission noise, rear-end noise [jk] or from the road? A partial bellypan might decrease road noise and increase engine noise.
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Old 10-19-2017, 04:49 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Simple Ejector seat would get rid of a lot of harshness noise and vibrations in my vehicle.



Preferably in the passenger seat.
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Old 10-19-2017, 07:03 AM   #24 (permalink)
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I'd like to have a rat rod with two B-58 ejection seats for bucket seats.


http://ejectionsite.com/eb58caps.htm


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Old 10-19-2017, 10:11 PM   #25 (permalink)
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I Dynamatted an S-10 once upon a time. I used a loooooot of Dynamat. I sealed holes with aluminum flashing, matted in the doors, under the door panels, above the headliner, the firewall, the floor, the back wall, etc.
Most of it was double layered and covered with 1/8" closed cell foam. I didn't care about mileage or weight at the time, which was good, because it was heavy.

On a scale of 1-100 (with 100 being really loud) my truck was a 60 when I started and a 57 when I was done. Super disappointing

Dynamat is great for reducing resonance. ONLY for reducing resonance. The nature of the mat makes it very poor at absorbing sound waves. It is thin and dense. It can absorb some very high frequencies, but lower (long wavelength) frequencies pass right through it. But it does a great job at calming down rattly interior panels (like it was designed to).

If your doors rattle when listening to music or if you have boomy/tinny/flexy body panels it will make a huge difference, if not, the difference is minimal.
If you have rattly speakers put Dynomat the size of the speakers in the door (right behind the speakers) it will clean up the sound a lot. Also, (if anyone has a sedan) put some mat around the deck speakers in the back and seal all of the holes between the trunk and the cabin.

If you put enough of it in your doors (75-200% coverage) your doors will close with a "chunk", like a luxury car.

Oh, and don't actually use Dynamat (I mean, you can, it is awesome) any butyl rubber (NOT tar based) sound mat will do the same thing for way less money.

When we moved last, I had my truck full of blankets/pillows/sleeping bags/comforters and it made my truck way quieter than all of the Dynamat ever did. As long as you take care of the rattles with the mat, all you have to do is drive around with your car full of blankets...all the time

If I had it to do over, I would have used a lot more open cell material like left over residential carpet padding, it is cheaper, lighter, and would have been more effective at quiting my truck. In this video, I am a big fan of all the high loft insulation they use. I also like the attention they give to the hood and inner fenders.

This is what I would do if I was making your car quieter (this is what I would like to do to my Civic, yeah it's a little weighty, but a god experiment?):

1. 30% Dynamat coverage in the doors (making sure not to cover the
drain holes). 20% Dynamat coverage on the doors (making sure to seal
as many holes as you can. 100% carpet padding on the doors. This will
help with NVH and especially helps make a nice chamber for your door
speakers.
2.Pull the seats and all of the carpet. Dynamat 10-20% of all surfaces.
Dynamat 100% behind rear speaker and 1-3" around them. 100%
carpet pad coverage on everything...put the carpet and seats back in
3. Dynamat 50% of rear fender wells and double carpet pad if it will
fit.
4. Leave the headliner where it is because headliners are a pain in the
neck. (If you really wanted to pull it, I would do 20% Dynamat
coverage and 100% 3/16" closed cell foam).
5. Install a Dynamat hoodliner under the hood, especially the back 3/4.
Put any extra bits on the firewall.
6. 50% Dynamat front strut towers and 100% 1/4-1/2" closed cell foam.
7. Glue 1/8-1/4" closed cell foam to the inside of the fender liners and to
the body behind the fender liners.
8. Wish I had double pane glass.

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Old 10-23-2017, 12:17 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtOmologato View Post
I Dynamatted an S-10 once upon a time. I used a loooooot of Dynamat. I sealed holes with aluminum flashing, matted in the doors, under the door panels, above the headliner, the firewall, the floor, the back wall, etc.
Most of it was double layered and covered with 1/8" closed cell foam. I didn't care about mileage or weight at the time, which was good, because it was heavy.

On a scale of 1-100 (with 100 being really loud) my truck was a 60 when I started and a 57 when I was done. Super disappointing

Dynamat is great for reducing resonance. ONLY for reducing resonance. The nature of the mat makes it very poor at absorbing sound waves. It is thin and dense. It can absorb some very high frequencies, but lower (long wavelength) frequencies pass right through it. But it does a great job at calming down rattly interior panels (like it was designed to).

If your doors rattle when listening to music or if you have boomy/tinny/flexy body panels it will make a huge difference, if not, the difference is minimal.
If you have rattly speakers put Dynomat the size of the speakers in the door (right behind the speakers) it will clean up the sound a lot. Also, (if anyone has a sedan) put some mat around the deck speakers in the back and seal all of the holes between the trunk and the cabin.

If you put enough of it in your doors (75-200% coverage) your doors will close with a "chunk", like a luxury car.

Oh, and don't actually use Dynamat (I mean, you can, it is awesome) any butyl rubber (NOT tar based) sound mat will do the same thing for way less money.

When we moved last, I had my truck full of blankets/pillows/sleeping bags/comforters and it made my truck way quieter than all of the Dynamat ever did. As long as you take care of the rattles with the mat, all you have to do is drive around with your car full of blankets...all the time

If I had it to do over, I would have used a lot more open cell material like left over residential carpet padding, it is cheaper, lighter, and would have been more effective at quiting my truck. In this video, I am a big fan of all the high loft insulation they use. I also like the attention they give to the hood and inner fenders.

This is what I would do if I was making your car quieter (this is what I would like to do to my Civic, yeah it's a little weighty, but a god experiment?):

1. 30% Dynamat coverage in the doors (making sure not to cover the
drain holes). 20% Dynamat coverage on the doors (making sure to seal
as many holes as you can. 100% carpet padding on the doors. This will
help with NVH and especially helps make a nice chamber for your door
speakers.
2.Pull the seats and all of the carpet. Dynamat 10-20% of all surfaces.
Dynamat 100% behind rear speaker and 1-3" around them. 100%
carpet pad coverage on everything...put the carpet and seats back in
3. Dynamat 50% of rear fender wells and double carpet pad if it will
fit.
4. Leave the headliner where it is because headliners are a pain in the
neck. (If you really wanted to pull it, I would do 20% Dynamat
coverage and 100% 3/16" closed cell foam).
5. Install a Dynamat hoodliner under the hood, especially the back 3/4.
Put any extra bits on the firewall.
6. 50% Dynamat front strut towers and 100% 1/4-1/2" closed cell foam.
7. Glue 1/8-1/4" closed cell foam to the inside of the fender liners and to
the body behind the fender liners.
8. Wish I had double pane glass.



Great post! You've confirmed a lot of my suspicions.... The dynamat stuff theoretically only seemed sufficient to lower frequencies of vibrating panels, and even then the only panels that likely contribute to this type of vibrational NVH are the large flat ones like door skins and such.

What would be a good way to adhere carpet pad? Should i use that headliner spray adhesive stuff? Butyl sheets or matts don't have the same mass as a dynamat product, so i suspect butyl sheets would be better to seal holes and such, correct? How would they compare vs dynamat for general damping along the metal panels? What do you think of something like this.

I wonder how hard it will be to remove carpet in the CRX.... I suspect i'll have to remove the dash and get all the way back up there. Are there any concerns with carpet pad and heat along the fire wall?

Should i be lining the fender wells in the inside or outside of the car? I suspect it will be really hard to prevent wear if its on the outside.... Also, My CRX (like most old hondas) never came with any of the OEM underbody panels. I'll probably have to make something out of ABS plastic or something. UGh....

Also, any good sources of closed cell foam?? Anything i can get that isn't car audio specific and has a 1000% markup?

Last edited by hispanicpanic; 10-23-2017 at 01:17 PM..
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Old 10-24-2017, 09:38 PM   #27 (permalink)
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I have not installed carpet pad yet, but I just ripped the carpet out of my living room, so it won't be long...

I am planning on putting the carpet pad primarily under the floors, but I will use headliner/similar adhesive for other areas as needed.

Dynamat is actually made out of butyl rubber. I usually shy away from roofing materials because they are asphalt (don't us asphalt!) but I see very little wrong with the butyl rubber roll you linked. One thing to keep in mind, it looks like both sides might be sticky, and it doesn't come off very good (at ALL) if you need it too. You could try to use it to stick to your car on one side and the carpet pad on the other side, but I suspect that you may have less than ideal results getting it to adhere to the carpet pad (if you try it, let me know how it goes). Also, it may be thinner than a dynamat type product, which would make it slightly less effective, but lighter (and cheaper)...it just depends on what you are going for.

Carpet should be easy in the CRX. Pull the seats and sill plates and lift the carpet up, one side at a time. If you want to pull the center console you could, but I suspect that significantly more noise is coming through your floorboards. I would not pull the dash because it is a pain in the neck for the small gains you will realize. I work my way up the footwells as far as I can go and call it good, The dash area isn't really a problem spot for noise, at least it wasn't in my s10.

Heat concerns along the firewall...
I take no responsibility for you lighting your car on fire yada yada yada...
I have no concerns at all. Drive it HARD with no carpet in it, you can still put your hand on the floor/firewall and not get burned. When you pull your carpet you will see...carpet padding! If you have any concerns you can put a layer of aluminum-backed butyl down first, then put you OEM carpet padding down (it might(?) be more temperature resistant) then extra carpet padding, then your carpet.

For the fenderwells I would do 20-50% coverage with dynamat/roof seal UNDER the car (it sticks pretty good with proper prep. In the trunk (trunk?...hatch!) I would do 50% dynamat coverage, then 100-200% carpet padding. Under the hood I would do 200-500% dynamat coverage on the shock towers, this won't stop a lot of road noise, but it will significantly dampen rocks/rain hitting the underside of the car.
I'm all for making things out of ABS, but fender liners sound like more trouble then they are worth (at least to me).

https://www.amazon.com/Closed-Neopre.../dp/B00YHT0CNA

Here is a link to some closed cell foam. It is pricey everywhere I can find it. That is why I am planning on using it sparingly where a have to and trying out my free carpet padding everywhere else, all I had to do was buy a house to get it!

If you want to get really crazy (and heavy) look up decoupling mass loaded vinyl, you never come back from that rabbit hole...neither does your wallet
Lizard Skin is also an option, but I have never used it.

Good luck on your dampening. You will notice that your car will be more comfortable and your radio will sound better. You can do a before/after with a free dB meter app, but the numbers will not be as impressive as how good it sounds.

I learned from googling and trying.
Keep learning, let me know if you find something new or awesome

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