Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > DIY / How-to
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-12-2015, 04:05 PM   #21 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: North East Pennsylvania
Posts: 53

Hatch - '86 Honda Civic DX
90 day: 50.81 mpg (US)

Lego - '99 Subaru Legacy wagon Outback limited
90 day: 26.46 mpg (US)

Sedan - '92 Honda Civic Lx
Team Honda
90 day: 59.43 mpg (US)

FIT - '07 Honda Fit Sport
90 day: 51.8 mpg (US)
Thanks: 116
Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts
I have a lot of really steep long hills that That I've lost too much power and started using more fuel just trying to maintain speed and I've been fiddling with Geting my wai right and wasn't sure what to do.


What size engine is this from?


And is 35c or 95f the magic number for how hot you want your intake air?
This valve maintains it to that temp correct?

__________________
  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 06-12-2015, 10:39 PM   #22 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Obormot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ukraine
Posts: 26
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 9 Posts
Send a message via Skype™ to Obormot
this part is from old carb. engine.

for carb. engines temperature of intake air must be not less than +35C, becouse gasoline evaporate in carb, this lowering temperature and can be icing on some carb. details.

but for modern injection engines i think +35C is too hot, i plan to readjust thermostate to +20C.

i check accuracy of my thermostate, it is about +/- 1C

engines was 1.1 - 1.6 L.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2015, 07:30 AM   #23 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Can you tell me the size of the 3 inlet holes?
I want to use it in my 1.4TDCI Ford, if the outside temp. is above 30 degrees celsius i see a rise in fuel economy. If i could keep my inlet air temp. above 30 at all times i guess it would always be more economical.
First i thought it was due to the higher diesel temp. but now i'm using Forscan and i see the diesel temp is always between 50 and 70 degrees, not depending on outside temp. but on engine load.
So i would like to know the diametres, if they are to small the engine chokes. (had one from a vw polo but that was way to small)
Thanks in advance!
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2015, 09:34 AM   #24 (permalink)
V8 guy
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 4,286

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)
Thanks: 94
Thanked 955 Times in 698 Posts
Diesels do not see benefit from warm air intake like gas motors do.
Keep the diesel on cold air. The only time you want warmed air going to a diesel is once it gets close to or below freezing.
The fuel economy going up because of the greater than 30'C temps is just due to fast warm ups.
__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, C5 front brakes, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2015, 04:27 AM   #25 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well, ordered one from ebay a few days ago. I'm going to test it to see it for myself. I'm still wondering if it's the fuel temp or the air temp but it could also be a combination of the 2.
Got a scangauge, using Torque and Forscan on my tablet with a bluetooth obdII dongle. Forscan has the most visible pids, sadly no trending options.
If after testing for a couple of months i see no change i will implement fuel preheating. Had a W124 diesel Mercedes and still got the fuel preheat system of that car. Works with engine coolant and a thermostat.
Thermostat has a fixed setting of about 25 degrees celsius.
Sadly enough i can't read IAT2, the sensor after my turbo. So i put in a outside temp sensor in the aluminium egr plug so i can see whats happening. Not as fast and accurate as the real sensor but with only 1 mm of aluminium between the outside temp sensor and the hot pressurized inlet air it reacts pretty quick.
Sadly it only goes to 70 degrees celsius and then says HI but i now have a pretty good picture of the inlet air temp.
Ordered 2 temp gauges from china which should go to 125 degrees, then i can also see the 70 plus temps.
My car doesn't have an intercooler, Ford in it's immense wisdom decided it wasn't necessary so no cold air for my engine
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2015, 04:49 AM   #26 (permalink)
V8 guy
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 4,286

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)
Thanks: 94
Thanked 955 Times in 698 Posts
Its neither elevated fuel or intake air temperatures will help, unless its around freezing.
The best thing you can do for a diesel is install an engine block/coolant heater to speed warm ups.
Every engine is different but diesels tend not to show gains with fuel or air heating.
__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, C5 front brakes, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2015, 07:34 AM   #27 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well i'm just curious, i drive 70 kilometres to work everyday (and 70 back). If it would be solely from the fast warm ups i could understand if i drove short distances. Of the 70 km about 45 is highway, 120 km/hr.I work shifts so i rarely have any traffic jams because i'm not on the road when the rest of Holland has to go to work or goes home.
99% of the time on cruisecontrol, simply because the car is drive by wire and there's almost no resistance in the gaspedal so my foot gets cramped.
First i thought warming the fuel was the answer, the Mercedes was equipped with it and there was almost no difference between summer and winter FE. (Must say it was a normally aspirated engine, standard cold air intake and indirect injection as the Ford is turbocharged, standard luke warm air intake and common rail)
As far as warm ups go, with Forscan i can see the amount of diesel injected per stroke, as soon as the engine is reaching 60 degrees celsius i see the injected amount decreasing. Cold or warm weather, this is always within the first 4 to 6 kilometres so not much diffrrence on a 70 km trip.
I know there are a lot of factors influencing the FE summer versus winter but as i don't have a garage i can't simply influence the engine and transmission oil temperature before startup for example.
What i can do is change the inlet air temp or with a bit more work, the diesel temp.
indirectly i'm also changing the engine's working temp 85 degrees celsius at 120 km/hr with cold air intake versus 88 degrees with warm air intake. Because there's no intercooler the compressed air is 10 to 15 degrees hotter when entering the engine at the same speed and load.

Last edited by Gombal; 07-27-2015 at 07:44 AM..
  Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2015, 03:04 PM   #28 (permalink)
V8 guy
 
oil pan 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NewMexico (USA)
Posts: 4,286

Sub - '84 Chevy Diesel Suburban C10
SUV
90 day: 19.5 mpg (US)

camaro - '85 Chevy Camaro Z28

Riot - '03 Kia Rio POS
Team Hyundai
90 day: 30.21 mpg (US)

Bug - '01 VW Beetle GLSturbo
90 day: 26.43 mpg (US)

Sub2500 - '86 GMC Suburban C2500
90 day: 11.95 mpg (US)
Thanks: 94
Thanked 955 Times in 698 Posts
70km may sound like a way more time then what is needed to warm up a vehicle but I have seen posts on here where people have found that they don't get their best fuel economy until after the engine oil and transmission fluid are up to full operating temperature.
Some of our members have made observations showing that it can take as long as 30 to 35 km to bring a car's engine oil and transmission up to full temperature.
These were on gasoline engine cars with no engine coolant to oil heat exchangers.

The reason why fuel heating doesn't tend do anything beyond initial warm up is because the diesel injectors are screwed into the cylinder head. So the injector and the fuel getting sprayed through it is going to be the same temperature as the cylinder head.

Out of all the diesel manuals I have read, all of them do not recommend using "cold air" if that cold air is below freezing to -10C. At that point they recommend drawing the air for combustion from inside the engines enclosure. The engines talked about often did not have intercoolers.

Another thing I have noticed with diesel cars is they tend to take longer to get to operating temperature then struggle maintaining operating temperature.
They are just too efficient for their own good sometimes.

Do you not have any way to plug in a engine block heater?
__________________
1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, C5 front brakes, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2015, 04:20 PM   #29 (permalink)
aero guerrilla
 
Piwoslaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Warsaw, Poland
Posts: 3,478

Svietlana - '05 Peugeot 307 SW
Diesel
90 day: 54.11 mpg (US)

Theodor - '01 Peugeot 106
90 day: 43.55 mpg (US)
Thanks: 995
Thanked 592 Times in 370 Posts
Reviving an old thread, now that it's getting cold...

I found a used thermostatic WAI for VW Polo/Lupo, part number 6N0 129 608 C. I could not find a used one for Lada/UAZ, and a new one would be more expensive.



More on the install in Theodor's modding thread.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	6N0129608.JPG
Views:	352
Size:	9.8 KB
ID:	18828  
__________________
e·co·mod·ding: the art of turning vehicles into what they should be

What matters is where you're going, not how fast.

"... we humans tend to screw up everything that's good enough as it is...or everything that we're attracted to, we love to go and defile it." - Chris Cornell

Piwoslaw's Peugeot 307sw modding thread



Last edited by Piwoslaw; 10-01-2015 at 04:37 PM..
  Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2015, 09:54 AM   #30 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Obormot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Ukraine
Posts: 26
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 9 Posts
Send a message via Skype™ to Obormot
another number is 6n0129608g
looks very similar to VAZ regulator, almost same construction.



https://translate.google.ru/translat...tml&edit-text=

  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com