Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > EcoModding Central
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-04-2010, 10:20 PM   #71 (permalink)
Moderate your Moderation.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Troy, Pa.
Posts: 8,919

Pasta - '96 Volkswagen Passat TDi
90 day: 45.22 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,369
Thanked 430 Times in 353 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by vskid3 View Post
Offroaders use dual transfer cases or "doublers" to further reduce gearing. They usually take the low range section of a transfer case and attach it to the existing transfer case. You could do the same, but reverse the add on. The only problem is you wouldn't be able to shift it on the fly.
I know about this, I've done it to get as low as 60:1 gear ratios for crawlers.

My thing is that I need something that I can shift on the fly, and it needs to have two very specific gear ratios.

I actually have also considered using an old automatic transmission w/o the torque converter as a sealed unit. (They don't need the fluid cooled if it's not going through a torque converter or being shifted up/down constantly.)

The problem is that there's only one 2-speed solution that I know of, and I don't think it has a gear that's close to 1:1

__________________
"ʞɐǝɹɟ ɐ ǝɹ,noʎ uǝɥʍ 'ʇı ʇ,usı 'ʎlǝuol s,ʇı"

  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 03-10-2010, 01:20 AM   #72 (permalink)
Moderate your Moderation.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Troy, Pa.
Posts: 8,919

Pasta - '96 Volkswagen Passat TDi
90 day: 45.22 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,369
Thanked 430 Times in 353 Posts

All the plugs from the engine


This was #1... they're all this bad, the electrodes are worn at nearly 45* angles, and the ceramic insulator is burned on the opposite side of the angled wear on every plug.

What would cause that, other than age?
__________________
"ʞɐǝɹɟ ɐ ǝɹ,noʎ uǝɥʍ 'ʇı ʇ,usı 'ʎlǝuol s,ʇı"

  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 01:32 AM   #73 (permalink)
(:
 
Frank Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: up north
Posts: 12,761

Blue - '93 Ford Tempo
Last 3: 27.29 mpg (US)

F150 - '94 Ford F150 XLT 4x4
90 day: 18.5 mpg (US)

Sport Coupe - '92 Ford Tempo GL
Last 3: 69.62 mpg (US)

ShWing! - '82 honda gold wing Interstate
90 day: 33.65 mpg (US)

Moon Unit - '98 Mercury Sable LX Wagon
90 day: 21.24 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,585
Thanked 3,548 Times in 2,215 Posts
They look fairly normal to me, just really aged and worn.

However, there's that one, maybe two, where the ground electrode extends so far past the center electrode... or is that just the angle of the pic? Strange.
__________________


  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 01:37 AM   #74 (permalink)
Moderate your Moderation.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Troy, Pa.
Posts: 8,919

Pasta - '96 Volkswagen Passat TDi
90 day: 45.22 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,369
Thanked 430 Times in 353 Posts
I changed the gap on the #1 plug, it was initially a little under 100 thou.

There are a couple that the ground straps were slightly offset from center, due to careless gapping, best I can figure.

Clearly, those plugs are very old. I can only wonder how old, as it honestly appears they'd almost never been changed in 160k. Never seen 'em get that bad, personally.

I'm going to keep checking my new ones periodically to make sure nothing's going on w/ the engine, but I don't see any evidence of lean/hot/rich, etc.

I do run the engine as low as 700 RPM under load (no shaking or anything!), so I'll also be checking for "dieseling" and coke buildup from incomplete burn, just in case. I know the carb'd engines can handle it, but w/ the knock sensor, it might be affected slightly by lower RPM high load operation, so I'll keep an eye out in case I need to disconnect the knock sensor.
__________________
"ʞɐǝɹɟ ɐ ǝɹ,noʎ uǝɥʍ 'ʇı ʇ,usı 'ʎlǝuol s,ʇı"

  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 01:41 AM   #75 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
roflwaffle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,490

Camryaro - '92 Toyota Camry LE V6
90 day: 31.12 mpg (US)

Red - '00 Honda Insight

Prius - '05 Toyota Prius

3 - '18 Tesla Model 3
90 day: 152.47 mpg (US)
Thanks: 349
Thanked 120 Times in 79 Posts
The internet says...

Quote:
Three conditions can indicate overheating of the spark plug. These are poorly eroded electrodes, yellow or white glaze and burned insulator nose. A defective thermostat, improper heat range or too rich carburetor can be a cause of this plug problem.
Two outa three ain't bad. It could be age, but might as well check if the carb could be running rich.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 01:43 AM   #76 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
roflwaffle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,490

Camryaro - '92 Toyota Camry LE V6
90 day: 31.12 mpg (US)

Red - '00 Honda Insight

Prius - '05 Toyota Prius

3 - '18 Tesla Model 3
90 day: 152.47 mpg (US)
Thanks: 349
Thanked 120 Times in 79 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Dave View Post
I've talked to literally hundreds of truck guys. Bigger diameter tires actually reduce MPG.

The reason is increased rotational moment of inertia. RMOI goes up with the square of the radius. Big tires are OK if you go long distances at a constant speed, never slowing down or speeding up.

I don't drive that way.
Even w/ large tires RMOI is quite small for most vehicles, something like 10Wh/mile assuming a 0-60-0 every mile. Odds are it's an increase Crr/CdA associated w/ the larger tires.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 01:44 AM   #77 (permalink)
Moderate your Moderation.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Troy, Pa.
Posts: 8,919

Pasta - '96 Volkswagen Passat TDi
90 day: 45.22 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,369
Thanked 430 Times in 353 Posts
Yeah, but none of the "causes" lines up with anything that's happened (since I've had it) with my engine.

They don't look too bad, aside from the obvious. The burnt ceramic, since I just looked at it again, isn't actually burnt. It's combustion deposit that I can scrape off with my thumbnail. It appears to be a brownish color around the outer edges of the deposit.
__________________
"ʞɐǝɹɟ ɐ ǝɹ,noʎ uǝɥʍ 'ʇı ʇ,usı 'ʎlǝuol s,ʇı"

  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 01:51 AM   #78 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
roflwaffle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,490

Camryaro - '92 Toyota Camry LE V6
90 day: 31.12 mpg (US)

Red - '00 Honda Insight

Prius - '05 Toyota Prius

3 - '18 Tesla Model 3
90 day: 152.47 mpg (US)
Thanks: 349
Thanked 120 Times in 79 Posts
If it's not actually burnt then it probably is just wear like Frank mentioned. If it shows up in another set then it might be worthwhile getting a wideband O2 sensor, especially since you could lean it out in that case.
  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 02:02 AM   #79 (permalink)
Moderate your Moderation.
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Troy, Pa.
Posts: 8,919

Pasta - '96 Volkswagen Passat TDi
90 day: 45.22 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,369
Thanked 430 Times in 353 Posts
I have to replace the heated O2 sensor anyway, the heater circuit isn't working, and I'm not aware of any quick fixes to make the heater circuit work again.
__________________
"ʞɐǝɹɟ ɐ ǝɹ,noʎ uǝɥʍ 'ʇı ʇ,usı 'ʎlǝuol s,ʇı"

  Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2010, 02:56 AM   #80 (permalink)
(:
 
Frank Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: up north
Posts: 12,761

Blue - '93 Ford Tempo
Last 3: 27.29 mpg (US)

F150 - '94 Ford F150 XLT 4x4
90 day: 18.5 mpg (US)

Sport Coupe - '92 Ford Tempo GL
Last 3: 69.62 mpg (US)

ShWing! - '82 honda gold wing Interstate
90 day: 33.65 mpg (US)

Moon Unit - '98 Mercury Sable LX Wagon
90 day: 21.24 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,585
Thanked 3,548 Times in 2,215 Posts
Speaking of O2 sensors incl. heated ones, is there a good way to clean em? All I've come across is soak em in gasoline. Would carb or brake or MAF sensor cleaners work? Don't want to hurt the dang thing either.

__________________


  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com