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freebeard 10-07-2017 06:00 PM

AI-informed fabricobbling
 
Supercomputer redesign of aeroplane wing mirrors bird anatomy : Nature News & Comment

http://www.nature.com/polopoly_fs/7....ws-graphic.jpg

Here's the proposition: How to mimic the structure that '9 out of 10' AIs prefer? The system seems to be curved spars in the thicker section, and individuated struts between the skins in the thinner sections.

What this reminds me of is the interior of the wing of the Goodyear Inflatoplane. I can't find a picture online [quickly], but there is this description at https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Goodyear_Inflatoplane

Quote:

The inflatable surface of this aircraft was actually a sandwich of two rubber-type materials connected by a mesh of nylon threads, forming an I-beam. When the nylon was exposed to air, it absorbed and repelled water as it stiffened, giving the aircraft its shape and rigidity. Structural integrity was retained in flight with forced air being continually circulated by the aircraft's motor.
What I would like to do is find an adhesive, rigid material that applies as a liquid. I could put it between two sheets of coroplast and suck them apart. If the material [easily] pulls apart as strings which then harden, that is what I would be looking for. The X'd struts I haven't figured out yet.

Candidate materials might include chopped fiberglass in resin, or Gorilla glue or ??? What do all y'all think?

JRMichler 10-08-2017 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by freebeard (Post 551998)
What I would like to do is find an adhesive, rigid material that applies as a liquid. I could put it between two sheets of coroplast and suck them apart. If the material [easily] pulls apart as strings which then harden, that is what I would be looking for.

You might experiment with construction adhesive. Apply a bead with a caulking gun, stick the sheets together, and immediately pull apart. It's been a long time since I used any, but I think it will pull apart as strings up to at least a 1/8" gap, maybe a 1/4" gap. Don't know if it will work for what you want, but at least it's cheap.

Grant-53 10-08-2017 08:46 PM

There are structural foams used in auto body repair.

freebeard 10-09-2017 01:23 AM

Construction adhesive is probably what I'm looking for. Premixed and inexpensive.

The only application I can think of is building a foamie R/C model airplane. Making polka-dots, pressing together and separating would keep weight down.


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