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jjackstone 04-02-2020 01:25 PM

Benefits of Covid-19
 
This is not a thread to downplay the seriousness or danger of Covid-19. It is simply to show that there are some temporary benefits.

The major benefit I see is that lower pollution levels are being seen around the world due to factory closings and less traffic of all combustion vehicles. Skies have turned blue in places where they are normally brown or yellow. Google pollution and coronavirus and you can read all the stories you want about this. The hope would be that at least a few of our leaders would see and understand that this could be normal if they had the vision and guts to eliminate fossil based energy as soon as possible. The oil and coal industries know it too. That's why they fight so hard to block renewable industries and technologies from the world. Enough of this topic.

The next benefit I've seen is on a more local level. I see families getting to spend more time together. Moms and Dads are home from work and kids are home from school. While we know the economic costs of this it is still nice to be able to watch families enjoy more time together.

Seeing people helping each other more. There are always going to be people who volunteer their time on a regular basis. But from my observations on some of the social media sites, more people than average are coming out to help their neighbors. And to me that is a good thing. Too many folks don't even know their next door neighbors these days but in this crisis they are meeting them and helping them.

Does any one else have positives to this disease?
JJ

Fat Charlie 04-02-2020 01:40 PM

I had a sniffle and was ordered to get it checked out. So I played "react to possible coronavirus".

It was glorious. I've never been able to take care of a cold by resting at home. Cold symptoms hit late Monday morning, I got sent home Monday afternoon, by Wednesday night it was almost entirely gone. On Thursday it was entirely gone.

That, and most dogs in the country probably think they're in heaven.

redpoint5 04-02-2020 01:51 PM

This may speed the rate at which we move toward distributed work. As companies are forced to implement remote work solutions, they may find that it works out well, and since they have already invested in facilitating work from home, they may retain that model once the crisis abates.

If that happened, it would have knockon effects. There would be less need for people to live in dense cities, so housing prices would fall. Less gridlock on roads due to less commuters. Less fuel consumption due to less commuters. Less time wasted commuting. The demand for office space would decline...

My big hope is that prestigious universities lose a bit of their value, exclusivity. If we're really serious about education, then offering extremely cheap online classrooms is the way to go. I've always dreamed of hiring the top educators in their respective fields, recording their lectures, and offering online courses based on those lectures. There's simply no reason why these top educators need to repeat the same lectures every semester to a new group of 400 people crammed into a lecture hall when you can do it once, and distribute to an infinite number of people. Not only that, but the lecture can be revisited as needed.

Why do banks close? It's the computers that do the important work, and they don't rest. I hope we demand that the banking system catch up to the 20th century, let along the 21st.

We probably should abandon the handshake as a greeting, as much as I like it. I've always liked the Japanese bow.

Then there's the unspoken societal benefits, such as providing some relief to our social security, medicare, and other tax draining systems. The disease tends to cull the least productive in the population. That isn't to say we should be happy that people are losing loved-ones for the greater good of society, but it is a benefit to society as a whole nonetheless.

rmay635703 04-02-2020 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redpoint5 (Post 620680)
This may speed the rate at which we move toward distributed work. As companies are forced to implement remote work solutions, they may find that it works out well, and since they have already invested in facilitating work from home, they may retain that model once the crisis abates..

I have to work from home and besides working in my pjs and cooking at home it actually sucks.

I am ďon callĒ since many aspects of my job arenít possible remotely.

The trouble I foresee is that I am much less efficient even on items I can do remotely, if I have questions I canít simply interact with the equipment to find solutions, itís more difficult to find anyone that knows anything and overall slower to do everything.
I can see some companies taking a knee jerk reaction like you suggest but everything will go down hill if they arenít very careful in who/how/when they do it.

Hopefully this is understood

redpoint5 04-02-2020 03:00 PM

True, I work 95% from home and miss social interaction and find it difficult to collaborate on something because people can ignore IMs and emails, but cannot ignore someone standing in a cubicle. It's also not healthy to wear lounge clothes while working since there's something about that routine that prepares one to work.

I'm not more productive from home, but one podcast said on average people are 30% more productive working from home. They talked about 5 levels of distributed work:

Quote:

The Five Levels of Distributed Teams

Level 1: Non-Deliberate Action
Nothing deliberate has been done by the company to support remote work, but employees can still keep the ball rolling somewhat if they’re at home for a day.
They have access to their smartphone, and email. Perhaps they dial in to a few meetings.
But they’ll put off most things until they’re back in the office, and will be a shadow of their office-bound selves.
Level 1 is where the overwhelming majority of organisations were prior to the COVID19 outbreak.

Level 2: Recreating the Office Online
This is where most organisations now reside — especially traditional ones.
It’s where your employees have access to videoconferencing software (eg. Zoom), instant messaging software (eg. Slack) and email, but instead of redesigning work to take advantage of the new medium, teams ultimately end up recreating online, how they work in the office.
This extends to many of the bad habits that permeate the modern office and suppress the ability of knowledge workers to actually think — here’s looking at you 10-person video-calls when two people would suffice, 60+ interruptions a day — now via Slack and phone calls, the sporadic checking of and responding to email more than 70 times a day throughout the day, or the hyper-responsiveness that is expected of all employees, leaving them wired to desktop dings like Pavlov’s dog.

At Level 2, people are still expected to be online from 9 to 5, and in some cases to be subject to what essentially amounts to spyware, with employers installing screen-logging software, such as RescueTime, on their employee machines so that they can play the role of Big Brother (see the Dictator’s Guide below for more like this).

Level 3: Adapting to the medium
At level 3, organisations start to adapt to and take advantage of the medium. Mullenweg points to shared documents (such as a Google Doc), that is visible to all and updated in real-time during a discussion, so that there is a shared understanding of what is discussed and decided, eliminating the risk of lost in translation errors and time wasted thereafter.
It’s at this stage that companies start to invest in better equipment for their employees as well, such as lighting for video-calls and background noise-canceling microphones.
Effective written communication becomes critical the more companies embrace remote work. With an aversion to ‘jumping on calls’ at a whim, and a preference for asynchronous communication

Level 4: Asynchronous Communication
‘I’ll get to it when it suits me.’ This is the nature of asynchronous communication.
The reality is that most things don’t require an immediate response. For most things, a one-way email or instant message should do the job, with the recipient responding when it suits them.
If something really is urgent, then the mode of communication should reflect that. Pick up the phone, or tap that person on the shoulder, but only if it is truly urgent.
Aside from the obvious and massive benefit of giving knowledge workers time to think, create and get into the flow state (a psychological state whereby we are up to five times more productive according to McKinsey), but asynchronous communication predisposes people to making better decisions.
As Robert Greene says, if you want to cut emotion out of the equation, increase your response time. Giving people time to think between question and response, rather than fall victim to blurting out the first thing that comes to mind in a meeting or when tapped on the shoulders, delivers a compound benefit to the organisation over time.
In order to avoid tennis games and duplication of effort, ensure that asynchronous messages:
provide sufficient background detail, where necessary provide clear action item(s) and outcome(s) required.
provide a due date
provide a path of recourse if the recipient is unable to meet your requirements.

Level 5: ‘Nirvana’
This is where your distributed team works better than any in-person team ever could. Mullenweg equates this level with having more emphasis on ‘environment design’, insofar as the organisation’s culture, and the physical environment people work in is concerned.
I'd say my company is somewhere between level 2 and 3. I do have a sweet headset, an electric standing desk (standing now), printer/scanner, and 3 displays.

https://ecomodder.com/forum/member-r...8-img-0284.jpg

jjackstone 04-02-2020 03:56 PM

So are you new to work at home guys increasing your power usage?
JJ

redpoint5 04-02-2020 04:29 PM

I've been working from home for 3 years. My electricity consumption may have gone down due to my awareness of it.

I turn the thermostat off when it's just me, and instead have a 100w heat lamp pointed at me. The office is consuming ~210 watts at the moment, and that includes my laptop, 3x 24" displays, heat lamp, and desk light.

Monthly consumption for both the garage and office (same circuit) is 60 kWh, or about $6.

By working from home, I've developed a routine after my wife leaves to turn off lights, turn off hair or clothes irons, and open blinds to maximize solar heating. All the most commonly used stuff are on smart switches, so I have routines set to turn off fans/lights at the time my wife leaves. When she gets home I have a "I'm home" routine that turns on everything we use when home.

Certain lights are on motion sensors such as the garage, game room, laundry, pantry, and closet. No need to remember turning those lights off. All lights are LED, some on dimmers. The instant hot water heater is on a smart switch that has a schedule to turn it off at night and during the workday.

oil pan 4 04-02-2020 06:21 PM

Highlights all the flaws of globalism. Looks like outsourcing all our manufacturing jobs to Asia wasn't the great idea everyone thought it would be and a good chunk of out sourcing everything to China for the last 25 years is about to be undone.
Suddenly no one thinks open boarders are a good idea, just look at Rhode Island, the ultimate sanctuary state that supports open boarders, don't want new yorkers fleeing to their state. Oh the irony, it is not lost on me.
Mexico wants to close the boarder.
For a brief moment people actually started to question how government employees on a low six figure salary rapidly become multimillionaires.
It looks like for the first time in generations large numbers of people are realizing the government doesn't exist to take care of them. When stuff goes sideways you are responsible for you. AntiGun and Gun hating liberals suddenly see the need to own a gun.
Biden is irrelevant.
The house sets up a covid19 investigation panel to Monday morning quarterback every decision made by the trump administration. Showing how petty and hateful they are.
The bail outs are supposed to have strings attached for multinational companies to bring jobs back home.
Stimulus checks are about the be cut and no one's screaming "not my president".
Last Gallup poll 60% of Americans approve of trumps handling of the virus.
I have only received 1 call about extending my cars warranty in the last month, I think the death toll in Asia is far higher than what we have been told.

jjackstone 04-02-2020 06:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redpoint5 (Post 620694)
...By working from home, I've developed a routine after my wife leaves to turn off lights, turn off hair or clothes irons, and open blinds to maximize solar heating. All the most commonly used stuff are on smart switches, so I have routines set to turn off fans/lights at the time my wife leaves. When she gets home I have a "I'm home" routine that turns on everything we use when home...

Ha! I have the same system except that I am retired. My roommate heads off to work and I go around turning off all the things she has left on. I put her desk top in sleep mode or it will continue to pull 100 watts for another 15 minutes unless she is running some program that won't let it automatically sleep.
JJ

redpoint5 04-02-2020 06:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 620697)
Highlights all the flaws of globalism. Looks like outsourcing all our manufacturing jobs to Asia wasn't the great idea everyone thought it would be and a good chunk of out sourcing everything to China for the last 25 years is about to be undone.

I'm undecided on this one. China in particular is a danger to global freedom because they are Communists and don't respect the rule of law. Intellectual property and health standards/inspections don't ring high on their priorities. Any company doing business there should expect their intellectual property to be forfeited to the Chinese. There's a reason why I can get knock-off Gillette razor blades that are identical in every way for a fraction of the price.

The problem with supply isn't outsourcing, it's not having a sufficiently diverse outsourcing. If we can get the same thing from 3 different countries, it reduces dependence on any single source and increases competition.

Globalism has the potential to unlock new efficiencies. For example, a development cycle can run 24/7 by moving pieces of development to various time zones. There are language and cultural barriers that can increase inefficiency, but it's possible to realize a net benefit to globalized development.

redneck 04-02-2020 07:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 620697)
Highlights all the flaws of globalism. Looks like outsourcing all our manufacturing jobs to Asia wasn't the great idea everyone thought it would be and a good chunk of out sourcing everything to China for the last 25 years is about to be undone.
Suddenly no one thinks open boarders are a good idea, just look at Rhode Island, the ultimate sanctuary state that supports open boarders, don't want new yorkers fleeing to their state. Oh the irony, it is not lost on me.
Mexico wants to close the boarder.
For a brief moment people actually started to question how government employees on a low six figure salary rapidly become multimillionaires.
It looks like for the first time in generations large numbers of people are realizing the government doesn't exist to take care of them. When stuff goes sideways you are responsible for you. AntiGun and Gun hating liberals suddenly see the need to own a gun.
Biden is irrelevant.
The house sets up a covid19 investigation panel to Monday morning quarterback every decision made by the trump administration. Showing how petty and hateful they are.
The bail outs are supposed to have strings attached for multinational companies to bring jobs back home.
Stimulus checks are about the be cut and no one's screaming "not my president".
Last Gallup poll 60% of Americans approve of trumps handling of the virus.
I have only received 1 call about extending my cars warranty in the last month, I think the death toll in Asia is far higher than what we have been told.

https://i.postimg.cc/CKjCcxBD/F8323-...6051221-A8.gif


:turtle:

>

oil pan 4 04-02-2020 07:53 PM

The Chinese absolutely steal any intel property they can and buy everything they can't steal.
Another thing that doesn't rank high on the Chinese governments "to do list" is take care of the environment.
Make everything here and that just about eliminates language and unit boundaries

D.O.G. 04-02-2020 08:03 PM

I'm one of those folk who still commutes for work, due to being a hands-on position and being deemed an "essential" industry.

I'm loving the really light traffic.:)

redpoint5 04-02-2020 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 620706)
The Chinese absolutely steal any intel property they can and buy everything they can't steal.
Another thing that doesn't rank high on the Chinese governments "to do list" is take care of the environment.
Make everything here and that just about eliminates language and unit boundaries

I'm no fan of the Chinese government, but not everything they do is terrible, and credit for things they do to improve environmental quality needs to be given. As consumers we're complicit in allowing the Chinese to "steal our jobs" and "steal our IP" and "poison the environment". We traded all that for getting goods extremely cheap. Every day I remark "how could they make this widget, ship it from China, and make a profit from the $2 price tag". I want for nothing because the Chinese have made everything cost so little (except for helicopters).

When you start from poverty, you don't have the luxury of concerning yourself with clean environments. As China increases economically, I expect environmental concerns to become more important. Their resource consumption will skyrocket though, because that's what happens when you prosper economically.

serialk11r 04-02-2020 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redpoint5 (Post 620680)

Then there's the unspoken societal benefits, such as providing some relief to our social security, medicare, and other tax draining systems. The disease tends to cull the least productive in the population. That isn't to say we should be happy that people are losing loved-ones for the greater good of society, but it is a benefit to society as a whole nonetheless.

I agree strongly with the rest of your post, but I don't think this part is working out the way you think it is. The economic damage is worse than the pension money saved, and the government printing money to pay for the bailouts does inflate away some of the federal financial obligations, but that was going to happen anyways.

oil pan 4 04-02-2020 09:48 PM

What communist society in the history of the world ever developed a sense of environmental stewardship because it was the right thing to do?

oil pan 4 04-02-2020 10:04 PM

Loffer sold 19 million dollars worth of stock in the days after the classified house briefing from businesses about to be hit hard in a bad way by the virus shutdown and bought dupont stock along with others such as bio medical and tech stocks who would appear to benefit from the medical industry being overwhelmed by a pandemic.
I think she should be fired. From a cannon. Into the sun.

serialk11r 04-02-2020 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 620725)
What communist society in the history of the world ever developed a sense of environmental stewardship because it was the right thing to do?

Humans value living in a clean, safe place, and the value of your real estate and by extension many other things goes up when you protect the environment. Food comes first since that's acute health, so that has to be taken care of before pollution, but as societies grow richer they care more about their longer term health.

redpoint5 04-02-2020 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by serialk11r (Post 620719)
I agree strongly with the rest of your post, but I don't think this part is working out the way you think it is. The economic damage is worse than the pension money saved, and the government printing money to pay for the bailouts does inflate away some of the federal financial obligations, but that was going to happen anyways.

Good point. I expect the economic fallout will be much worse than the gains.

oil pan 4 04-03-2020 12:29 AM

Even card carrying kool-aid drinking jackasses are questioning why everything comes from china.

redpoint5 04-03-2020 02:16 AM

Well, even LitesOut had contempt for China, which surprised me.

I may have less contempt than "it".

Fat Charlie 04-03-2020 08:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 620697)
It looks like for the first time in generations large numbers of people are realizing the government doesn't exist to take care of them.

The house sets up a covid19 investigation panel to Monday morning quarterback every decision made by the trump administration. Showing how petty and hateful they are.

So the government doesn't accomplish its task to promote the general Welfare, and when one branch tries to establish why that occurred, they're petty and hateful?

Not all threats drive tanks, and there used to be a biodefense office in the NSC. That's great, it keeps every state, town and hospital from having to prepare on its own for every possible pandemic. Sadly, that office was created by guy who was from Kenya, so it had to go. Looking into things like that doesn't strike me as petty.

It happens whichever party's in charge, and both parties have to own the underfunding that left the national stockpile less than fully stocked. None of this happened overnight, and most of it didn't originate in the Oval Office. Dragging it out into the light is a good thing.

redneck 04-03-2020 09:21 AM

Quote:

Fat Charlie;

Sadly, that office was created by guy who was from Kenya, so it had to go.

So heís from Kenya, not Hawaii...???





:turtle:

>

Fat Charlie 04-03-2020 10:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redneck (Post 620757)
So heís from Kenya, not Hawaii...???

At least according to a loud tangerine that told me this virus thing was a hoax.

redneck 04-03-2020 10:40 AM

.

https://i.postimg.cc/3rXx7V9g/B8-B5-...-E9-BB9313.jpg

.

oil pan 4 04-03-2020 11:13 AM

Funny how that works. It seems like the only time the Democrats worry about the general welfare and establish accountability is during a Republican administration.

Piotrsko 04-03-2020 11:18 AM

Funny also that the only times Republicans care about spending is during Democratic administration. Can you imagine the libertarian outcry if Dems spent 2 trillion on anything?

oil pan 4 04-03-2020 11:31 AM

I'm good with no stimulus or bail outs. To quote star wars "let it die".
The only thing they agree on is spending more money. Democrats spend it like a drunk sailor and Republicans spend like it's about to go out of style.

Piotrsko 04-03-2020 11:34 AM

I agree with you there. Save more spend less, you'll be golden.

serialk11r 04-03-2020 12:35 PM

It's not just government spending and bailouts, it's also the Fed's ever decreasing interest rates and QE (aka free money). Capitalism is an illusion when the too-big-to-fail (investment grade credit) and people with access to Congress get to eat from the free money pie first.

Fat Charlie 04-03-2020 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 620763)
Funny how that works. It seems like the only time the Democrats worry about the general welfare and establish accountability is during a Republican administration.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Piotrsko (Post 620764)
Funny also that the only times Republicans care about spending is during Democratic administration. Can you imagine the libertarian outcry if Dems spent 2 trillion on anything?

And things actually get ugly when one of the parties controls everything. Then there isn't even a need for a coverup.

oil pan 4 04-03-2020 03:38 PM

When one party controls the house, senate and presidents office we always get screwed.
Last time that happened we got the "affordable care act" that made health care more affordable by quadrupling the price in a decade.
And they almost pasted carbon cap and tax. Which by now would have likely doubled energy costs and made the 2008 recession never ending.

jjackstone 04-03-2020 08:09 PM

Please get the politics out of this thread. I see enough of it everywhere else in the news. Thanks.
JJ

JSH 04-03-2020 08:46 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by redpoint5 (Post 620680)
My big hope is that prestigious universities lose a bit of their value, exclusivity. If we're really serious about education, then offering extremely cheap online classrooms is the way to go. I've always dreamed of hiring the top educators in their respective fields, recording their lectures, and offering online courses based on those lectures. There's simply no reason why these top educators need to repeat the same lectures every semester to a new group of 400 people crammed into a lecture hall when you can do it once, and distribute to an infinite number of people. Not only that, but the lecture can be revisited as needed.

You can't get much cheaper than free. MIT has hundreds of courses online for free.

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/find-by-topic/

redpoint5 04-03-2020 09:10 PM

The first great lecture I can remember watching on Youtube was a Harvard ethics class by Michael Sandel. I thought it was fantastic; way better than sitting in my community college classroom. I suppose there would still be a need for Q&A and shared student interaction since often we don't know the smart questions to ask and other students do. Still, this could be provided at a fraction of the cost online. An expert would still need to host the online classroom, but having not wasted their time giving the lecture, they can spend that time engaging the students. Best would probably be having students teach each other through discussion with an expert merely keeping things on track.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBdf...C13C91CFFEFEA6

JSH 04-03-2020 10:47 PM

Good things from COVID 19

1. I don't have to waste 1 1/2 - 2 hours a day commuting to work
2. I can pump my own gas in Oregon (but don't need to since I'm not driving)
3. We will likely save about $500 a month from not visiting restaurants / taphouses.
4. My work travel is cancelled through the end of May.

jjackstone 04-04-2020 12:01 AM

I wonder how many fewer animals will be killed due to less transportation.

oil pan 4 04-04-2020 02:01 AM

Only had about 1 call this year about extending my cars warranty.

jjackstone 04-04-2020 04:18 PM

I have noticed that a number of the homeless "communities" are no longer where they once were. I don't know if they were ran off or if an indoor place was found for them to live while the virus continues. Either way it is cleaner in the area I travel through.

Another thing I have noticed is how quiet things have become. Coming from a country setting 20 years ago one of the first things I noticed when I moved to the city is how much noise traffic made. I live two miles from a freeway and although I have gotten used to the constant background sound, I can still hear it all the time. The last week or so I have just barely been able to hear the noise even in what would normally be peak travel times.
JJ

freebeard 04-05-2020 02:42 PM

Quote:

Does any one else have positives to this disease?
JJ
Fewer gender reassignment surgeries will led to a drop in the suicide rate.

When I hear 'the new normal' I think more like 'everything normal is new again'.


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