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-   -   Best 150-350cc fuel injected engine for small, light, aerodynamic reverse trike (https://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/best-150-350cc-fuel-injected-engine-small-light-28066.html)

ScotD 01-27-2014 08:23 PM

Best 150-350cc fuel injected engine for small, light, aerodynamic reverse trike
 
I plan a small, light (300 lbs), aerodynamic reverse trike, able to cruise at highway speeds for hours. I'm coming to believe that fuel injection and electronic ignition are best. I've been thinking 250cc, though smaller or somewhat larger would be OK. I want maximum mpg, AT LEAST 125 mpg avg on street and highway. I expect cruising at 60 mph. I imagine using the entire rear of a motorcycle, from engine back and building my own front end and body.

Suggestions for best engine/donor machine?

Thanks,
Scot

NeilBlanchard 01-27-2014 08:37 PM

It needs to be water cooled, for better efficiency and for practicality of good aero.

ScotD 01-27-2014 08:47 PM

Yes. Any suggestions for particular engines? Preferably ones that could be had at a reasonable cost and would be very good for the application.

P-hack 01-27-2014 09:11 PM

air cooled isn't a deal breaker, they have aftermarket fuel injection conversion kits for small motorcycle engines as well. One cylinder is probably better than two, but expect to pay a premium for a factory injected cbr300. I would consider a 10hp diesel yanmar clone too, but then you have to sort out a transmission.

DonBarletta 01-28-2014 09:30 AM

I am sure it has been mentioned elsewhere on Ecomodder repeatedly, but be sure to check CraigVetter.com for recommendations. Also, the 2014 Honda PCX150 scooter has a fuel-injected water-cooled engine, and stock it already gets a rated 102 mpg, so if your body shell will be ultra aerodynamic (as Craig says, "round in the front, and pointy in the rear"), and you'll be riding one-up, and only want to go 60 mph, I imagine that that scooter's drivetrain would be up to the job.

jkv357 01-28-2014 09:39 AM

Honda CBR250R would be my choice in that range. Single cylinder, water cooled, F.I. and tuned for lower RPM running than most.

mechman600 01-28-2014 01:42 PM

CBR250 engine is a good choice. Is there a California spec version or are they all? The reason I ask is that the California version of many of the older fuel injected bikes had an O2 sensor, meaning closed loop, meaning more efficiency.

What I would do is go to bikebandit.com, look up the parts schematic for the bike in question, and see if it has an O2 sensor at all. If it does, then BAM!...that's a good candidate.

Example...check out this CBR250 breakdown. Item #11 is the O2 sensor. BAM!
2011 Honda CBR250R Parts, 2011 Honda CBR250R OEM Parts - BikeBandit.com

renault_megane_dci 01-28-2014 03:47 PM

I would go for a CBR 125 but I don't know if you get them on your side of the world.

Reason is "there is no substitute for cubic inches" also applies backwards for FE ...

Also, 6 speed and injection from 2007 ...

P-hack 01-28-2014 04:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScotD (Post 408730)
...Preferably ones that could be had at a reasonable cost...

I'd have a hard time chopping up a cb250r, but no problem with an old $300ish bike. Consider one with a title to make it easier to get a plate. Also check craigslist if you think you can cobble together a fuel injection system (not too bad especially on a thumper, premade for $400-$500 and in reality maybe $60 in actual parts).
wenatchee motorcycles/scooters classifieds - craigslist

ScotD 01-29-2014 12:27 PM

Thanks all. Some good ideas and additional research for me to do.

jkv357 01-29-2014 02:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by P-hack (Post 408841)
I'd have a hard time chopping up a cb250r, but no problem with an old $300ish bike. Consider one with a title to make it easier to get a plate.

True. It would have to be crashed or salvage to be worth it.

No CBR125s for us in the U.S.

ScotD 02-03-2014 04:46 PM

Both the Honda Grom (125) and Honda CBR250R could be the good choices for donor machine. Each has advantages and disadvantages; both are fuel injected and electronic ignition. The biggest difference is weight and power. The Grom is 225 lbs curb weight, the 250R about 360 lbs. I’d guess this means my finished trike would be under 300 lbs using the Grom vs. around 435 lbs using the 250R. I weigh about 175 and imagine often having another 25 lbs of baggage (500 vs 635 total weight).

Assume that aerodynamics are the same (same area and drag coefficient) and that they would be driven the same (NOT using the 250’s greater power for faster acceleration or cruising speeds) – what is likely to be the difference in MPG? For highway travel? For around town?

I expect most of my use will be highway, cruising around 55mph – traveling on the 2-lane highways of the less populated west, not freeways. Of course there would also be some use “around town”, though since I live in a town of under 1000 people with no stoplights, that’s not city driving, and generally I prefer to walk or bicycle. I will also use the trike for getting to/from trail heads and around local rural areas some, and, of course, occasionally for getting around a city during a trip.

I imagine I’ll get at least 125 mpg, and hope for much more, but I don’t know enough to be able to evaluate accurately, nor to evaluate the difference likely between 125cc & 250cc approaches.

Input appreciated.

Thanks, Scot

user removed 02-03-2014 05:32 PM

I don't think the Grom would have enough power. The CBR has been around for 3 years now so there will be much more salvage opportunities. If you find the power to be more than adequate then lower the overall final drive ratio.

regards
Mech

ScotD 02-03-2014 06:45 PM

Mech,

Thanks for your posts both to this and my aerodynamics thread. On that one you mention that your trike project is 1100 lbs, so I can easily see that you'd see the Grom as lacking adequate power! Since using a Grom I expect my trike's weight would be under 300 lbs (vs over 400 if using the 250); and since the Grom reviews suggest 60mph stock and my trike would be far better aerodynamically, I think it would have adequate power for my desires and use (though greater power would create additional versatility). Yes, final drive ratio is important . . . and yes, availability of a Grom is problematic.

The California Commuter, built in 1980 and setting world mpg records that year, started with a Honda Super 90 engine, and they got highway speeds and something like 186 mpg. To make it legal on the freeway they had to increase the power, using a stroke kit to bring it up to 130 cc. Though there was no significant weight change, the mpg went down to under 160mpg (they had expected an even greater change).

So since using a CBR250R would result in at least an extra 100 lbs weight, as well as twice the cc's, it seems very likely that mpg would be significantly lower than using a Grom . . .

But the truth is, that for me, this is all speculation - somewhat educated guessing!

Any further input???

jkv357 02-03-2014 08:48 PM

Grom's engine is ancient-tech, air-cooled, and has a 4-speed trans.

Look at the numbers that Ninja 250s have reached in the Vetter competitions and 3-wheel vehicles and compare the Ninja's engine design to the CBRs - the CBR is much better suited for F.E.

renault_megane_dci 02-04-2014 01:37 AM

Your best bet is the smallest displacement, FE and the most gears.
An engine designed for efficiency from low RPM rather than for top end power is also a big plus.
I think the CBR 250 fits in the "designed for efficiency rather then power" cluster (compared to a EX250 for example)
I wouldn't go for a 4 speed engine.

P-hack 02-04-2014 08:13 AM

You need to understand how to title a vehicle too. Even a salvage title in my state can be a PITA, for a few scratches. I bought a salvage bike, once, that was the last time.

Get a clean title, get it in your name, THEN convert it to a trike, and you are probably in business.

Get a salvage title, make a homemade trike, take it to the inspector to get it approved, and you might be pushing it to the junkyard.

An old thumper (with a carb for starters, can retrofit FI later) will get you rolling. 4 speeds would probably be adequate. I was getting like 100mpg on an old cb125 4 speed, carb, unmodified. Plus it was like $300

renault_megane_dci 02-04-2014 02:13 PM

The old thumper would never be watercooled.
I wonder if you can tin weld material to a head in order to water cool it ?

If it is the case then avenues are open.

Aim for the longest stroke it is a mechanical torque booster.

mechman600 02-04-2014 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by renault_megane_dci (Post 409938)
The old thumper would never be watercooled.
I wonder if you can tin weld material to a head in order to water cool it ?
If it is the case then avenues are open.
Aim for the longest stroke it is a mechanical torque booster.

I agree, water cooling would be best. Generally, water cooled motorcycle engines have higher CR and thus higher efficiency. But if you are stuck, forced air cooling with small electric fans will work.

jkv357 02-04-2014 02:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScotD (Post 409832)
The California Commuter, built in 1980 and setting world mpg records that year, started with a Honda Super 90 engine, and they got highway speeds and something like 186 mpg. To make it legal on the freeway they had to increase the power, using a stroke kit to bring it up to 130 cc. Though there was no significant weight change, the mpg went down to under 160mpg (they had expected an even greater change).

So since using a CBR250R would result in at least an extra 100 lbs weight, as well as twice the cc's, it seems very likely that mpg would be significantly lower than using a Grom . . .

I looked up the California Commuter (The California Commuter - World Record Holding 155 MPG Freeway Legal Car!) and read most of the info, and am surprised they only got 157 mpg on gas. The aero-modded Ninja 250s that Vic and Allan run in the Vetter Challenge are right in that range - even with speeds over 55 mph average and windy conditions.

I didn't see much info about the engine of the California Commuter. I'd like to know what RPMs they were running at 55 mph and at what % of throttle opening.

Here's info from Vetter's site about his competitions in the 80s - 1985 Fuel Economy Contest.

Best numbers were from Matsu Matsuzawa with 440 mpg. This page lists some of his mods - 1985 Matsu talks. In the results it says "Honda XL80", but in that page he says he stroked a 125 up to 185ccs. If Matsu was using 185ccs to get 440 mpg the CBR250's displacement shouldn't be a huge handicap - especially with newer-tech and F.I. in real-world riding where you will need acceleration at times. He also added a neutral available from top gear so he could coats freely - pulse and glide style.

Craig Vetter later commented (here and on his site) that he does not approve of P&G and will not allow it in the current competition.

American Viking 02-04-2014 03:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by P-hack (Post 408841)
I'd have a hard time chopping up a cb250r, but no problem with an old $300ish bike. Consider one with a title to make it easier to get a plate.

CBR250's get crashed as often as 600cc bikes and written off just as quickly with little to no damage to the frame, engine or driveline. That plastic is terribly expensive.
Call your local bike salvage yard and talk to them about buying a running total of a cbr250, ninja 300. I bet its a lot cheaper than trying to find some running complete bike with EFI.

user removed 02-04-2014 03:16 PM

The Ninja sucks (mileagewise) compared to the CBR, I have owned both, sold both. I like my $650 04 GZ250 which gets mileage better than the Ninja and it's simplicity defined.
I also like the TU 250X Suzuki (owned one of those). Air cooled, EFI,02 sensor (Ninja does not have one Federal version).

regards
Mech

jkv357 02-04-2014 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Old Mechanic (Post 409946)
The Ninja sucks (mileagewise) compared to the CBR, I have owned both, sold both. I like my $650 04 GZ250 which gets mileage better than the Ninja and it's simplicity defined.
I also like the TU 250X Suzuki (owned one of those). Air cooled, EFI,02 sensor (Ninja does not have one Federal version).

regards
Mech

Agreed - but it's amazing how good of numbers they can do with some aero help or careful riding in the right conditions.

If I was going to the trouble and expense of building an aero mpg cruiser I'd skip the Ninja and go for a CBR as a base. I also agree about finding a crashed one to use. It would take a bit more effort, but they are out there if you know where to look.

user removed 02-04-2014 04:21 PM

Salvage HONDA CBR250 for sale

Here are some. In Va they can be titled, salvage titled, or non repairable. I'm not sure how you would get a bike built from a non repairable. Maybe if you built the frame and just used the rest of the parts from the bike.

A salvage title should be fine but you need to check with your state laws as well asthe lawswhere the bike is located.

regards
Mech

American Viking 02-05-2014 08:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Old Mechanic (Post 409946)
The Ninja sucks (mileagewise) compared to the CBR, I have owned both, sold both. I like my $650 04 GZ250 which gets mileage better than the Ninja and it's simplicity defined.
I also like the TU 250X Suzuki (owned one of those). Air cooled, EFI,02 sensor (Ninja does not have one Federal version).

regards
Mech

Well here in the US market the Ninja 250 was always a carb bike (even the new 300 is carbed here.), so you'd have to convert it to EFI to get the mileage out of it. Second its a twin, so its going to be less efficient but more powerful than a single (the GZ250 is a single). The 2011-on cbr250 single has always been EFI, so of course right from the start it's going to be better than the baby ninja.

Now as far as simplicity the GZ rear suspension is prehistoric. Dual shocks without progressive linkage and a drum brake, yeah that's going to be great fun trying upgrade that system to ride nice with two people on board, never mind stop worth a hoot from 60mph...
Add in that your going to have to do a ton of work routing enough cooling air to the GZ250, as opposed to the water cooled ninja and cbr where you just have to mount a radiator near the front of the vehicle.

Building a reverse trike from a GZ250 is going to take a lot more work in a lot more areas than starting with the baby ninja or the cbr250r.

If I was going to build a reverse trike, I'd look for a narrow middle capacity motorcycle, like a Suzuki SV650, Honda Deauville or some other 600-700ccc water cooled V-twin.
Another useful configuration would be smallish boxer engined machine.

I'd look for a shaft drive. Shaft drive would be useful for maintenance as I'm sure that no one wants to have to take the rear body off the trike to change out a chain and sprockets every 3rd or 4th oil change.

You'll need a wider rear wheel and tire, to handle the load. The gz250 specs a 66 index tire - maximum load for that tire is 694 lbs, Curb weight of the gz is 330lbs, so minus the front forks its maybe 270, add two average sized passengers and its right up on the tires max load. That's before you add trike frame (with its safety cage), front suspension, front brakes, upgrade the rear brakes, add a larger gas tank, all the bodywork, etc...

it would be way easier to work with a little bit larger bike.

Frank Lee 02-05-2014 08:22 PM

Chain drives need replacement every 3rd or 4th oil change? Who knew! :eek:

The bodywork must be removed to change this chain and sprockets? Who knew!

Passenger weight? What passenger? :confused:

ScotD 02-05-2014 08:43 PM

Thanks all, lots of good info! I'm still waiting for clarification from the state bureaucracy on requirements to license. They ARE working on it. After some good input on the aerodynamics forum I expect I'll stay with narrow body and front wheels outboard. I'll try to design the body for easy access to do maintenance. The various comments have me leaning toward the cbr250r as donor machine, though I think I'd rather find a smaller, lighter, and therefore (all other things being equal) more fuel efficient choice . . . any thoughts on that?

user removed 02-05-2014 08:49 PM

The Ninja 300 is fuel injected (without any doubt). As I said before I owned one. It does NOT have an oxygen sensor (federal emissions cali might have one), which the CBR 250 has as well as the TU205X. I never mentioned making a wheeler out of the GZ250, just that I own one and at $ 650 with 3300 miles one of the best bike purchases I ever made.

http://www.topspeed.com/motorcycles/...-ar160322.html

Viking, you can check my fuel logs to compare the bikes I have owned, and I know the fuel delivery system on each one.

The OE Metzler tire on the back of my GZ250 is rated for a max of 661 pounds, more than the OP's proposed trike bike and his weight combined, on all 3 wheels.

11 different motorcycles in my current fuel log on this site.

regards
Mech

Grant-53 02-05-2014 09:05 PM

There may be some dirt bikes that also may be suitable donors in the 175cc range if re-geared. Forced air and an alcohol/water mist could help cooling. A cylinder head temp gauge is often used to monitor the engine on racing karts. Allow 1 hp for every 36 lbs of gross vehicle weight. Junkyard parts for windshield wiper and ventilation fan. One advantage of a water cooled engine is the ease of installing a heater core for defrost and passenger heat. Chains and belts last a long time if they are kept clean and adjusted.

iveyjh 02-06-2014 12:00 AM

This might bear a good look.

HONDA VTR250 2003 Pearl Shining Yellow.jpg
Manufacturer Honda
Also called Interceptor 250, MC33
Production 1988-1990, 1997-
Predecessor Honda VT250 Spada
Class Naked bike
Engine 4-Stroke, 4 valves per cylinder, 249 cc 90 V-twin DOHC
Bore / stroke 60 mm 44 mm (2.36 in 1.73 in)
Compression ratio 11:1
Power 23.9 kW (32.1 hp) @ 10,500 rpm
Torque 23.5 Nm (17.3 ftlb) @ 8,500 rpm
Transmission 5-speed, wet multi-plate clutch, chain drive
Suspension 41mm showa telescopic fork (front), direct-link monoshock with preload adjustment (rear)
Brakes Single 296mm disc, 2 piston caliper (front), single 220mm disk, 1 piston caliper (rear)
Rake, trail 2530', 96 mm (3.8 in)
Wheelbase 1,405 mm (55.3 in)
Dimensions L 2,040 mm (80 in)
W 720 mm (28 in)
H 1,050 mm (41 in)
Seat height 760 mm (30 in)
Weight 141 kg (311 lb) (dry)
Fuel capacity 13 L (2.9 imp gal; 3.4 US gal)
Oil capacity 2.4 L (0.53 imp gal; 0.63 US gal)
Turning radius 2.7 m (8 ft 10 in)

iveyjh 02-06-2014 12:00 AM

This might bear a good look.

HONDA VTR250 2003 Pearl Shining Yellow.jpg
Manufacturer Honda
Also called Interceptor 250, MC33
Production 1988-1990, 1997-
Predecessor Honda VT250 Spada
Class Naked bike
Engine 4-Stroke, 4 valves per cylinder, 249 cc 90 V-twin DOHC
Bore / stroke 60 mm 44 mm (2.36 in 1.73 in)
Compression ratio 11:1
Power 23.9 kW (32.1 hp) @ 10,500 rpm
Torque 23.5 Nm (17.3 ftlb) @ 8,500 rpm
Transmission 5-speed, wet multi-plate clutch, chain drive
Suspension 41mm showa telescopic fork (front), direct-link monoshock with preload adjustment (rear)
Brakes Single 296mm disc, 2 piston caliper (front), single 220mm disk, 1 piston caliper (rear)
Rake, trail 2530', 96 mm (3.8 in)
Wheelbase 1,405 mm (55.3 in)
Dimensions L 2,040 mm (80 in)
W 720 mm (28 in)
H 1,050 mm (41 in)
Seat height 760 mm (30 in)
Weight 141 kg (311 lb) (dry)
Fuel capacity 13 L (2.9 imp gal; 3.4 US gal)
Oil capacity 2.4 L (0.53 imp gal; 0.63 US gal)
Turning radius 2.7 m (8 ft 10 in)

renault_megane_dci 02-06-2014 02:34 AM

In my book, torque peak RPM is very important in everyday driving comfort that's why I would go for a single.

Did you ever consider a DR 350 ?
It's 6 speed, oil cooled and I guess you could tune the inlet to boost torque.
Obviously you need the electric starter variant.

Or maybe even better a DRZ 250 which is DOHC and would allow for a fancy cam timing if fuel injected (see "atkinsoning motorbike engine" thread)

jkv357 02-06-2014 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iveyjh (Post 410117)
This might bear a good look.

HONDA VTR250 2003 Pearl Shining Yellow.jpg
Manufacturer Honda
Also called Interceptor 250, MC33
Production 1988-1990, 1997-
Predecessor Honda VT250 Spada
Class Naked bike
Engine 4-Stroke, 4 valves per cylinder, 249 cc 90 V-twin DOHC
Bore / stroke 60 mm 44 mm (2.36 in 1.73 in)
Compression ratio 11:1
Power 23.9 kW (32.1 hp) @ 10,500 rpm
Torque 23.5 Nm (17.3 ftlb) @ 8,500 rpm
Transmission 5-speed, wet multi-plate clutch, chain drive
Suspension 41mm showa telescopic fork (front), direct-link monoshock with preload adjustment (rear)
Brakes Single 296mm disc, 2 piston caliper (front), single 220mm disk, 1 piston caliper (rear)
Rake, trail 2530', 96 mm (3.8 in)
Wheelbase 1,405 mm (55.3 in)
Dimensions L 2,040 mm (80 in)
W 720 mm (28 in)
H 1,050 mm (41 in)
Seat height 760 mm (30 in)
Weight 141 kg (311 lb) (dry)
Fuel capacity 13 L (2.9 imp gal; 3.4 US gal)
Oil capacity 2.4 L (0.53 imp gal; 0.63 US gal)
Turning radius 2.7 m (8 ft 10 in)

The U.S. only got those in '88 to '90 as the full-fairing VTR250. Europe and Canada got the newer VTR250 naked, later with F.I.

Neat bike, but a V-twin 250 and tuned more toward top-end than a CBR. Not very common either. In the U.S. they briefly competed with the Ninja 250, and in many ways were a better street bike. Just a touch slower overall, but less top-end biased that the Ninja. Never caught on and was dropped quickly. Came back elsewhere as a naked "mini Monster" and eventually got F.I.

I liked them back in the late 80s (except for the paint) and would seriously consider a newer model if they were available here.

U.S. version -

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q...psfd2e7d60.jpg

Slightly modified newer European version -

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q...pse8ff9114.jpg

P-hack 02-06-2014 10:53 AM

dual shocks are fine on a trike, especially since you are getting a side load. Make sure the rear wheel can handle it.

mechman600 02-06-2014 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by renault_megane_dci (Post 410125)
Did you ever consider a DR 350 ?
It's 6 speed, oil cooled and I guess you could tune the inlet to boost torque.
Obviously you need the electric starter variant.
Or maybe even better a DRZ 250 which is DOHC and would allow for a fancy cam timing if fuel injected (see "atkinsoning motorbike engine" thread)

DRZ400 would be better. Liquid cooled and much higher compression. DOHC for fiddling with the timing if that's your desire. Throttle position sensor on the carb for a slightly more sophisticated timing map. I owned the dual sport version. Spectacular mileage and lots of power.

Extremetrikes 02-06-2014 11:52 AM

I know what I've created will never set record breaking fuel economy but the horse power and looks you get while driving it make up for the lack of mpg ;-). It's an injected 2005 Honda Silverwing powered reverse trike. I used the front brakes , suspension , shortened steering column and modified pedal assembly from a 1993 Mazda Miata.

Extremetrikes 02-06-2014 12:18 PM

I have been considering the drag or friction difference between the 215/40/18 front tires and something smaller like 175/50/15's. but not sure how to calculate the difference

American Viking 02-06-2014 02:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Frank Lee (Post 410090)
Chain drives need replacement every 3rd or 4th oil change? Who knew! :eek:
The bodywork must be removed to change this chain and sprockets? Who knew!
Passenger weight? What passenger? :confused:

The OP stated he wanted to build a reverse trike that could carry two people at speeds up to 60mph.

I was just pointing out that the chain and sprockets will wear a lot faster with the added load (compared to just the bike). Also adding the body work will make it more complex compared to just servicing the chain on normal bike.
Therefore they will need a heck of lot more maintenance than shaft drive and why I would look for a shaft drive bike to base it on.

American Viking 02-06-2014 03:11 PM

The later efi equipped vtr250 is a great choice. I just don't know where you could find one here in North America.

Another bike that would fit very well would be the VFR400. 400cc v4, but its not a US market bike, so finding one would be tough and the few that were imported have a cult following, so your not going to find a running one cheap.
There are several great bikes that would fit into trike really well.
Honda CB-1, Honda hawk gt, Yamaha fzr400, ..
But they all have a cult level following, so finding a healthy example to hack into a trike is not going to be easy.

Frank Lee 02-06-2014 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by American Viking (Post 410181)
The OP stated he wanted to build a reverse trike that could carry two people at speeds up to 60mph.

I was just pointing out that the chain and sprockets will wear a lot faster with the added load (compared to just the bike). Also adding the body work will make it more complex compared to just servicing the chain on normal bike.
Therefore they will need a heck of lot more maintenance than shaft drive and why I would look for a shaft drive bike to base it on.

Is that so...
Quote:

Originally Posted by OP
My project is a small reverse trike for 1 person for highway travel, probably using a 125 to 250 cc engine and weighing between 300 and 500 lbs, cruising typically at 55mph, and getting over 125mpg I expect.

One person only.
Trike estimated to add 75 lbs.- a good deal less than a passenger.
Divide the weight between three instead of two wheels AND put proprtionally more on the front and voila! less weight on the back wheel.
We don't know if the body covers the chain, or if it wouldn't have a simple access panel.
I've got chain drive bikes and none of them have needed replacement chains/sprockets anywhere near that often.
OP wants efficiency and chain drive is far more efficient.
Belt drive is probably better yet.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with drum brakes either.


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