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ksa8907 01-10-2018 05:40 PM

Chevy volt gas only mileage
 
So I bought a 2012 Volt partly due to the opinions collected here. I do like the car, lots of fun and much better than the prius, in my opinion.

So after some driving I have noticed that the torque app only tells me that I get between 30 and 38mpg when in gas only mode. I don't want to believe that, and I don't really, my cts could get 30mpg cruising at 60mph.
However, today on the way home I traveled 35.2 miles and only burned 0.7 gallons with an indicated average of 48.7mpg while keeping a steady 60 mpg without drafting, though I did have a significant tail wind around 15mph.

Interestingly, the car seemed to be pulse and gliding in that the generator would kick on and off as the battery was charged and discharged. I need to find a more accurate way to see instant mpg.

Does anyone have experience with that? I'll be scouring and likely posting over at gm-volt in the near future.

Baltothewolf 01-10-2018 07:22 PM

My buddy has a 2013 volt that I drove to Arizona (350~ miles) recently. At 75mph with cruise control on, I got 41mpg. And that was with running the A/C. Tires at 40psi.

M_a_t_t 01-10-2018 08:27 PM

Have you thought about getting an MPGuino? Fairly simple to wire in, and it auto turns on when the engine starts.

ksa8907 01-10-2018 09:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by M_a_t_t (Post 558512)
Have you thought about getting an MPGuino? Fairly simple to wire in, and it auto turns on when the engine starts.

I need to better explore what would be the best option. Part of the trouble is I haven't devised a way to separate or properly factor in the miles driven in EV mode. When I park it each evening it tells me I averaged somewhere in the high 60's mpg, as though the 13.x kwh it takes to charge the car was free.

rmay635703 01-10-2018 09:44 PM

I should make a graph and you should read up on your cars tech at GM-volt if you want to optimize.

First off, basics, 44psi minimum, stock OEM tires only, heat at 68F eco (if you need it), preferably heated seats only until the gasser fires.
Preheat carefully (especially if you have L2 and your engine does not start) to avoid wasting lots of battery and gas off the bat.
Many volts have the wrong oil, you should use 0w30 synthetic in the winter instead of the 5w30 Dino juice many dealers slop in there.


The Volt is like the Prius and all GM products and gets epa ratings around 80F with 44psi in the tires.

You must use the stock OEM tire to get EPA MPG, any other LRR tire will drop a minimum of 3mpg, let alone snows or standard tires.

For every 10 degrees below 80F you will loose about 1mpg
This is the same as my cobalt and sadly the Buick before it.
My friends Gen iii 2013 Prius gets 28-36mpg all winter until it warms then mid 40’s.

So while I get 40 mpg at 60mph at 80F, guess what I get at 10F if I don’t drive slow?

Next,

ERDTT, you own a 2012 volt which is much more affected than later years,
ERDTT gets about 25mpg but allows/offsets heater energy use so you get more EV range, personally I hate ERDTT as it is so wasteful. I disable it and run without electric heat on my long trips to maintain 45+ EV miles and 38+ MPGcs even at -15f

You have a few options with a 2012

1. In the morning about a half hour before leaving (in cold) disable engine start and turn on the car plugged in to L1 with lights, heater (except the seat) turned off let it idle plugged in, the car should not start the engine and warm the battery then charge the battery increasing your range and gas mpg.
This can also be accomplished by setting the charge timer to have charging finish right as you leave.
Being a 2012 you might need the hold mode app to start the car plugged in without the ice firing up.
In your cars advanced settings there may be a erdtt setting which allows a cold or very cold setting (15f or 35f), depending on your heating efficiency and heat use you may gain range from one setting or the other

2. Get
https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...VoltHold&hl=en

That app, if you use electric heat (I don’t) it’s very important to instead engage hold mode once your on the highway, otherwise you loose EV range and fuel economy (a lot)

You then manually cycle into EV mode once the car is warm and use eco heat mode then on out.
.

Another tip you need to be careful with is grill block, wai and insulation
The volt does not heat up to operating temp at 20F and lower with full heat running, 170F if my thermostat is correct, if you have a means to monitor temp a grill block, WAI and optionally engine insulation help you gain back some lost economy in winter.

The volt will run on e10 or e15 regular unleaded but gains a few mpg on non ethanol Premium, Premium around here is about a buck a gallon more so I run Kwik trip 88 which is e15, I seem to do well on that gas for reasons I can’t explain.

I will post more tips but basically no new car is remotely efficient in cold weather but with the volt you have a choice to avoid using half your energy on heat if you want

ksa8907 01-11-2018 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rmay635703 (Post 558519)
I should make a graph and you should read up on your cars tech at GM-volt if you want to optimize.

First off, basics, 44psi minimum, stock OEM tires only, heat at 68F eco (if you need it), preferably heated seats only until the gasser fires.
Preheat carefully (especially if you have L2 and your engine does not start) to avoid wasting lots of battery and gas off the bat.
Many volts have the wrong oil, you should use 0w30 synthetic in the winter instead of the 5w30 Dino juice many dealers slop in there.


The Volt is like the Prius and all GM products and gets epa ratings around 80F with 44psi in the tires.

You must use the stock OEM tire to get EPA MPG, any other LRR tire will drop a minimum of 3mpg, let alone snows or standard tires.

For every 10 degrees below 80F you will loose about 1mpg
This is the same as my cobalt and sadly the Buick before it.
My friends Gen iii 2013 Prius gets 28-36mpg all winter until it warms then mid 40ís.

So while I get 40 mpg at 60mph at 80F, guess what I get at 10F if I donít drive slow?

Next,

ERDTT, you own a 2012 volt which is much more affected than later years,
ERDTT gets about 25mpg but allows/offsets heater energy use so you get more EV range, personally I hate ERDTT as it is so wasteful. I disable it and run without electric heat on my long trips to maintain 45+ EV miles and 38+ MPGcs even at -15f

You have a few options with a 2012

1. In the morning about a half hour before leaving (in cold) disable engine start and turn on the car plugged in to L1 with lights, heater (except the seat) turned off let it idle plugged in, the car should not start the engine and warm the battery then charge the battery increasing your range and gas mpg.
This can also be accomplished by setting the charge timer to have charging finish right as you leave.
Being a 2012 you might need the hold mode app to start the car plugged in without the ice firing up.
In your cars advanced settings there may be a erdtt setting which allows a cold or very cold setting (15f or 35f), depending on your heating efficiency and heat use you may gain range from one setting or the other

2. Get
https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...VoltHold&hl=en

That app, if you use electric heat (I donít) itís very important to instead engage hold mode once your on the highway, otherwise you loose EV range and fuel economy (a lot)

You then manually cycle into EV mode once the car is warm and use eco heat mode then on out.
.

Another tip you need to be careful with is grill block, wai and insulation
The volt does not heat up to operating temp at 20F and lower with full heat running, 170F if my thermostat is correct, if you have a means to monitor temp a grill block, WAI and optionally engine insulation help you gain back some lost economy in winter.

The volt will run on e10 or e15 regular unleaded but gains a few mpg on non ethanol Premium, Premium around here is about a buck a gallon more so I run Kwik trip 88 which is e15, I seem to do well on that gas for reasons I canít explain.

I will post more tips but basically no new car is remotely efficient in cold weather but with the volt you have a choice to avoid using half your energy on heat if you want

The dealer installed brand new firestone fr710's, so we'll see if those are any good. I do plan to run full synthetic 0w30, used that in my cts also. I have a voltec L2 charger, it's the only charger I have.

I drive 59 miles each way so it will be interesting how erdtt affects my miles. I have only used the battery 4 days yet and I have gone from about 28 miles on battery to 34 today, the car sat on the lot dead for about a month before I got it.

I will most likely be ethanol blending because I can buy it for about 35% less than 87 E10. This last tank I averaged 45 mpg hand calculated after subtracting 95 miles of EV miles. Not too shabby. Also, I have the front lisence plate mount on this car and the entire lower grill blocked except behind the plate mount, air can still get behind it. Engine coolant temps stay very normal, 160 to 188f.

rmay635703 01-12-2018 10:07 AM

It sounds like your doing fairly well considering.

I donít think you will be happy with the cars range and efficiency with those tires long term, you wonít see as massive of a summer time boost in range and MPGs.
Typically you loose about 5 miles EV range with them but as they wear you will gain back a couple miles.


They may be desirable to you for winter traction though I would recommend getting a pair of $30 volt sized ecopias from Walmart s clearance rack for at least the front so you can have winter and summer tires (the front tires affect range more than rears)

Time will tell I suppose

If your into e85, I strongly recommend this

https://www.hptuners.com/forum/showt...une-(Volterado)

ksa8907 01-16-2018 11:03 AM

To reduce the amount of information spread all over the forum, I think I will use this thread as my "build" thread.

I have decided to track my mileage per charge and just use the reported gallons consumed and the miles driven in ER mode. Mileage tracked on this site will be in ER mode only, ignoring my EV miles. This will obviously create some inaccuracies as erdtt will boost EV range.

Speaking of EV miles, I put the car in mountain mode to reserve 10 miles of charge. There was quite a bit of traffic on 31/465 this morning so I took some side roads and my display moved from 10 miles to 6 miles after driving about 10 miles in normal mode, so non-highway use makes a MASSIVE difference in EV range.

Also, at second look, the torque app does appear to be pretty accurate with the instant mpg display but the trip mpg meter records 0 miles when the engine shuts off even when in ER mode.

rmay635703 01-16-2018 02:18 PM

As you learn the cars quirks you will slowly become more efficient.

EV mode is much more efficient below 50mph, slower the better

Gas mode is somewhat complex but generally more efficient at 40mph and higher with a ďsteady footĒ coupled with no stops.


Since you have L2 the following is very useful in cold weather

Burping - the key to Voltec bliss?

Ari_C is the guy


Over about a year I optimized my twice weekly long trip to be 10 miles shorter, mostly lower speed but only about a half hour ďlongerĒ
Following that path I can get up to 72 miles EV summer and only use 0.56 gallons of gas on a 100 mile drive.

Generally when you increase your real EV range on a trip you will also decrease gas use.
There are some circumstances where lower gas MPGcs will actually lower trip fuel consumption by allowing more EV operation.

Good Luck,
The volt is a fun car for a hypermiler

ksa8907 01-24-2018 10:09 AM

Update for today. Electric cars are great in stopped traffic, almost no effect on electric or gas usage. Freezing rain this morning had me sitting on a closed highway for almost an hour.

So far, I absolutely love electric driving. This 1st gen volt has very sharp handling, I love it, would be amazing with sport tires and not lrr's.

cowmeat 01-24-2018 12:19 PM

I just got the free oil change/tire rotation on mine (one of two that came free since it's certified). In fifteen months the oil life dropped from 57% the day I bought it to 43% when they changed the oil. Now it's at 100% oil life

I also filled up the tank the other day for the first time in a long while, hopefully it'll last to the end of the year.:thumbup:

I'm sold on the Volt and have no real complaints, and in a year or so I plan to trade it in for a newer one.

Enjoy! It's an awesome car, way more fun to hypermile than my Insights were

rmay635703 01-24-2018 01:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cowmeat (Post 559589)

I'm sold on the Volt and have no real complaints, and in a year or so I plan to trade it in for a newer one.

Enjoy! It's an awesome car, way more fun to hypermile than my Insights were

Your trading up to a 2013 so soon?

Bit by the hold mode feature ;)

ksa8907 01-28-2018 10:48 PM

I may need to put this in a new/different thread to get more visibility, however: Since the engine in Volts is a generator only and runs at 80% load any time it is on, would a warm air intake be beneficial?

I know the classic answer of "try it and find out", just looking for any guidance before I go through the trouble.

Thanks

ksa8907 03-12-2018 05:59 PM

So I've put about 6k miles on the car since I bought it. The weather has been so chaotic, I can't really get a feel for how my different driving is affecting mileage. However, I think the vehicle will respond VERY well to aero mods as a slight tailwind is all that is needed to push me into the mid 40's.

I typically drive with the cruise set to 62 to 65 mph, mostly straight highway with very few stops and slowdowns.

I have a hunch that a significant part of the lower cold weather fe is due to colder intake temps, but i have not tried a wai yet.

Have been consistently getting between 37 and 39 mpg when driven properly, obviously less when driving faster or aggressively. Also, have NOT been using heat while in EV mode, ERDTT is forced at 25f ambient so it's not too bad.

Also, most of my miles since early January have been with RUG 87 and not the suggested premium. Tried ethanol and surprisingly, no CEL and not much of a difference in mpg either.

ProDigit 03-12-2018 07:25 PM

There's no way you can accurately measure, as you're driving the car, and at the same time charging the battery.
The best thing you could do, is replace the battery with a large capacitor (provided the volt's electronics aren't going haywire).

But yeah, you won't be able to accurately measure; unless you add the driving distance of the charged state of the battery.
Eg: You start out with a complete empty battery, until the battery is like 50% charged. Then you turn off the engine, and continue to drive on the remaining juice of the battery.
I think that's about as accurate as you can get.

At 60MPH, the Bolt, Cruze, or Volt, uses about 6HP to maintain speed.
The Cruze does about 50MPG average on that.
The Volt, probably loses some efficiency, but it being in the high 40's of MPG would probably be quite spot on.

ksa8907 03-12-2018 09:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProDigit (Post 563606)
There's no way you can accurately measure, as you're driving the car, and at the same time charging the battery.
The best thing you could do, is replace the battery with a large capacitor (provided the volt's electronics aren't going haywire).

But yeah, you won't be able to accurately measure; unless you add the driving distance of the charged state of the battery.
Eg: You start out with a complete empty battery, until the battery is like 50% charged. Then you turn off the engine, and continue to drive on the remaining juice of the battery.
I think that's about as accurate as you can get.

At 60MPH, the Bolt, Cruze, or Volt, uses about 6HP to maintain speed.
The Cruze does about 50MPG average on that.
The Volt, probably loses some efficiency, but it being in the high 40's of MPG would probably be quite spot on.

I would say thats a very poor way to use the vehicle. The gas engine should never be used to "charge" the battery. Why have a battery then? The idea is you have a battery that you charge from the grid which is cheaper per unit of energy that gasoline. Then, switch over to gas if you need it.

In charge sustain, CS mode, I consistently get about 37 to 39 mpg with windy, 15f to 50f weather and winter gas.

ProDigit 03-12-2018 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ksa8907 (Post 563633)
I would say thats a very poor way to use the vehicle. The gas engine should never be used to "charge" the battery. Why have a battery then? The idea is you have a battery that you charge from the grid which is cheaper per unit of energy that gasoline. Then, switch over to gas if you need it.

In charge sustain, CS mode, I consistently get about 37 to 39 mpg with windy, 15f to 50f weather and winter gas.

That's how the volt operates. It's engine always charges the battery, while the battery powers the electric motors.
On the volt you don't have the choice to drive the gasoline engine directly.

And I think that's the question of this thread,
How much does driving the gasoline engine give on MPG.

ksa8907 03-12-2018 10:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProDigit (Post 563638)
That's how the volt operates. It's engine always charges the battery, while the battery powers the electric motors.
On the volt you don't have the choice to drive the gasoline engine directly.

And I think that's the question of this thread,
How much does driving the gasoline engine give on MPG.

The engine will operate to keep the battery at a particular state of charge then adjust output depending on driving conditions. If the load is low enough that the battery level rises, the engine shuts off and runs on battery until it drops below a certain threshold.

So, long drives in CS mode actually show gas only mode mpg very well. The battery isn't supplying power, it is being used as a buffer.

ksa8907 05-09-2018 10:46 PM

So, things are going well. I have an idea, looking for confirmation or counter arguments.

I can calculate the overall efficiency of the volt's series/parallel hybrid setup by using the gas (ER) efficiency divided by the EV efficiency, since i drain the battery every day.

On the last couple days, I calculate, ER is 31% as efficient as EV. Further, does that mean EV is .310/.337 = 92% efficient? Hold that, I'm sure I'm getting too tired for math.

Ecky 05-10-2018 07:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProDigit (Post 563638)
That's how the volt operates. It's engine always charges the battery, while the battery powers the electric motors.
On the volt you don't have the choice to drive the gasoline engine directly.

And I think that's the question of this thread,
How much does driving the gasoline engine give on MPG.

To my knowledge, this isn't accurate. The Volt has an orbital transmission just like a Prius. The engine is fully capable of driving the wheels directly. The first gen's engine was clutched behind one electric motor but still mechanically drove the wheels. It was clutched so it could be disconnected, but that's not even true of the 2nd gen - it's geared directly.

http://gm-volt.com/wp-content/upload...02/Slide21.jpg

http://gm-volt.com/wp-content/upload...02/Slide51.jpg


For comparison, here is the Prius's layout. The only major difference is that the Prius's engine is connected to a planet gear rather than the ring gear, and the wheels are connected to the ring gear rather than to the planet gear.

http://www.twinkletoesengineering.in...ck_diagram.gif

rmay635703 05-10-2018 07:23 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Iím not sure what your saying.

I just use the energy screen which keeps
kWh's / miles and
Gallons / miles
Separate

You have to write them down though and calculate each day

The overall fictional ďmpgĒ on the display IS relavent for comparison on a steady trip where you drive the same distance and use a full battery everyday.

If your trip varies a lot or you are trying new routes you need to keep a mpg book of the energy display

I guess I would need to understand what you are looking for

Ecky 05-10-2018 07:32 AM

When the Volt calculates its fictional MPG, does it use 33.7kw = 1 gallon of gasoline for the electric portion?

EDIT: To my knowledge, the only car which truly operates as a series hybrid most of the time is the 2nd gen Accord Hybrid. It has no gearbox. The engine can drive the gears at a single fixed ratio on the highway, but otherwise it truly operates as a generator only:

http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-...Drivetrain.jpg

ksa8907 05-10-2018 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rmay635703 (Post 569211)
I’m not sure what your saying.

I just use the energy screen which keeps
kWh's / miles and
Gallons / miles
Separate

You have to write them down though and calculate each day

The overall fictional “mpg” on the display IS relavent for comparison on a steady trip where you drive the same distance and use a full battery everyday.

If your trip varies a lot or you are trying new routes you need to keep a mpg book of the energy display

I guess I would need to understand what you are looking for

What I really want to calculate is the bsfc of the generator, which should be possible since the data coming from the generating motor would be ththe "dyno".

Looking to calculate the efficiency of the generator system. Comparing ev to er gives a relationship, then tying that back to the efficiency of the ev would give actual efficiency. Right? Average, of course.

rmay635703 05-10-2018 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ecky (Post 569217)
When the Volt calculates its fictional MPG, does it use 33.7kw = 1 gallon of gasoline for the electric portion?

See my attachment and do the math, promise itís not hard.


Gen 2= yes
Gen 1= no

But honestly there is Volt stats (if you are lazy)

And of coarse the results of each complete charge is on the energy display when you get home.

Itís very simple to take kwhrs per mile and gas miles metrics
And calculate your respective ďactualĒ combined MPGe metric

rmay635703 05-10-2018 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ksa8907 (Post 569232)
What I really want to calculate is the bsfc of the generator, which should be possible since the data coming from the generating motor would be ththe "dyno".

Looking to calculate the efficiency of the generator system. Comparing ev to er gives a relationship, then tying that back to the efficiency of the ev would give actual efficiency. Right? Average, of course.

Um no,

You would need a scangage or dashdaq like device that could take instantaneous power and fuel flow rate metrics to give you an estimate and since the volt is almost always sending power to the wheels and battery at the same time you would get strange behavior and likely just nonsense

ksa8907 05-10-2018 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rmay635703 (Post 569240)
Um no,

You would need a scangage or dashdaq like device that could take instantaneous power and fuel flow rate metrics to give you an estimate and since the volt is almost always sending power to the wheels and battery at the same time you would get strange behavior and likely just nonsense

As long as it is not directly driving the wheels, all power being generated would show up under mga, right? Doesn't matter if it feeds mgb or the battery.

Ecky 05-10-2018 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ksa8907 (Post 569244)
As long as it is not directly driving the wheels, all power being generated would show up under mga, right? Doesn't matter if it feeds mgb or the battery.

Looking at the transmission diagrams, this might be possible on the gen1 but not the gen2, since MGA is always connected to the planetary gearset.

redpoint5 05-10-2018 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ecky (Post 569210)
The Volt has an orbital transmission just like a Prius. The engine is fully capable of driving the wheels directly. The first gen's engine was clutched behind one electric motor but still mechanically drove the wheels. It was clutched so it could be disconnected, but that's not even true of the 2nd gen - it's geared directly.

Thanks, that cleared up my misunderstanding. I had always thought the Gen I was a series only hybrid, but apparently it is a series / parallel hybrid.

Ecky 05-10-2018 01:41 PM

And that's probably a good thing, overall. More drivetrain losses, but it's likely a lesser evil then converting from mechanical to electrical and then back to mechanical energy.

ocnorb 05-10-2018 01:48 PM

Just a comment on Volt gas only mpg. Because I live at high altitude (5000 ft) I decided to try some ethanol free 88 octane gasoline. On longer trips my previous best was 42mpg (gas only).

In November and early December we took the same trip to the in-laws (Thanksgiving and Christmas parties) running the "Clear88 " and it got 46.5mpg each trip. Far and away the best mpg the car has gotten.

Ecky 05-10-2018 01:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ocnorb (Post 569279)
Just a comment on Volt gas only mpg. Because I live at high altitude (5000 ft) I decided to try some ethanol free 88 octane gasoline. On longer trips my previous best was 42mpg (gas only).

In November and early December we took the same trip to the in-laws (Thanksgiving and Christmas parties) running the "Clear88 " and it got 46.5mpg each trip. Far and away the best mpg the car has gotten.

Malibu Hybrid (Chevrolet Malibu) | Fuelly

Bigger car, bigger engine, smaller battery, same transmission. :confused:

ocnorb 05-10-2018 01:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ecky (Post 569280)
Malibu Hybrid (Chevrolet Malibu) | Fuelly

Bigger car, bigger engine, smaller battery, same transmission. :confused:

First gen Volts gasoline engine was not optimized for the car. It was a budgetary choice.

The new Volts and Malibu are much better in that department.


The big difference between the Volt and the Malibu is that I rarely have to buy gas at all.

Ecky 05-10-2018 01:57 PM

Malibu still delivers better gas-only economy than the 2nd-gen Volt, despite being a larger car with a worse CdA, higher weight and bigger tires. It puzzles me.

ocnorb 05-10-2018 02:07 PM

1 Attachment(s)
When you filter for all Malibu Hybrids with the 1.8l motor it looks more realistic. Still a very small sample size.

Chevrolet Malibu MPG - Actual MPG from 27 Chevrolet Malibu owners

Attachment 24142

rmay635703 05-10-2018 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ecky (Post 569283)
Malibu still delivers better gas-only economy than the 2nd-gen Volt, despite being a larger car with a worse CdA, higher weight and bigger tires. It puzzles me.

Weight + Aero + Exhaust gas heat recovery

GM spent a lot of time optimizing the Malibu and claims the heat recovery is what makes the MPGs

Too bad they ship shod the Volt

Ecky 05-10-2018 02:28 PM

Certainly took them long enough, it's been standard fare on most cars form Japan for more than a decade. Heat recovery was the norm in Hondas at least since the late 2000's, and the Insight had in 18 years ago.

rmay635703 05-10-2018 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ecky (Post 569290)
Certainly took them long enough, it's been standard fare on most cars form Japan for more than a decade. Heat recovery was the norm in Hondas at least since the late 2000's, and the Insight had in 18 years ago.

The Volt like all Chevy cars is VERY affected by rather small temperature changes.

Folks in downright hot areas, especially at elevation tend to get the optimal gas mpgs from a Volt, those of us in temperature or cool areas get much lower MPGs.

My highest FE was during 90F weather.

Which means a WAI is needed on the Volt

And yes my Insight looses much less FE in the cold than the Volt or even my Cobalt, itís a damn shame that Chevy, dodge and Ford ignore cold weather operation

19bonestock88 05-10-2018 06:47 PM

It is a shame that cold weather is so ignored by GM... comparatively my car really sucks the fuel in the wintertime and my second best tank(personal best before P&G was implemented) was in 90* weather

roosterk0031 05-10-2018 10:44 PM

TD, thinking of trading n the Impala for a 2014 Volt for $14k, 50,000 miles, is that a OK deal, and will you if I drive to you make it FFV. Daughters going to Mt Rushmore to work for the summer so wouldn't be till end of summer when I see it again.

ProDigit 05-11-2018 03:14 AM

If you look at the priuses, used ones can easily be gotten with 300k miles on, that still drive!
I presume it's the electric motor to assist in acceleration, that's the main reason for those engines to last longer (although some older priuses with burnt motor/generators have been spotted, which is a good $3k-5k on repairs).

The most efficient is indeed when the gasoline engine does the job on the highway, and the electric motor is only to assist in any acceleration.

I think that's what most manufacturers are doing right now. And equip a battery powerful enough to capture regenerative braking and provide minor acceleration torque added on the engine.

It would have been even better if they would harvest exhaust energy (like a turbo), but instead of compressing the air in the engine, use the energy to drive a generator, which charges the battery while driving (or drives the electric motors for a tiny amount of power added to the wheels).

The system of a motor charging the battery, while driving, is one that puts more wear on the batteries, and reduces efficiency.

If you want a great deal, take a look at the Ford Fusion Energi.
They say it's a turtle on the highway, but 104 eMPG doesn't sound too bad, does it? Neither does their $9k cash rebate.
Their Energi (a $30k car), Hybrid ($25k car), and regular Fusion ($22k car), all sell for the same price!


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