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-   -   Cooling the Ferrari F12 (https://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/cooling-ferrari-f12-39378.html)

aerohead 05-12-2021 04:50 PM

Cooling the Ferrari F12
 
In the July, 2016 issue of CAR and DRIVER, Tony Quiroga hot-lapped a 2016 Ferrari F12 Berlinetta to fuel exhaustion, at Buttonwillow Raceway Park, Bakersfield, California, USA, driving continuously at around 80% power ( to conserve the Michelin tires ).
In 80-minutes he drained the $113.52, 23.7-gallon ( 776.819-kWh-e ) Unleaded Premium gasoline tank, after completing 28-laps, for a total range of 89.11-miles, consuming 2.65- million Btus, @ 3.76- mpg ( 8,717.5 Wh/mile ).
3.76-mpg = 34.18% of EPA CITY mpg rating.
His maximum velocity was 130-mph. His average velocity was 67-mph.
Allowing for 35% thermal efficiency, the Ferrari produced 33,131.4-Btu ( 273.275- bhp-hour average ) useful shaft work per lap, with approximately 23,073.66- Btu lost to the exhaust, and an equal amount to the radiator per lap.
With a Tesla Model 3 'fuel tank', the Berlinetta has a total range of 8.6-miles.
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In the December, 2018 MOTOR TREND, Kim Reynolds reported that a Tesla Model 3 Performance, hot-lapped at Streets of Willow Springs ( International Raceway), Rosamond, California, USA, beat the Ford Mustang GT PP2, while returning ' an astonishing' 17 mpg-e, averaging 66.5-mph ( 36.0-mph - 114.1-mph ), 75- kWh, 2.288-gallons-e, 255,899.78-Btu, 38.898-miles range.
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Pondering the Ferrari and Tesla:
* 23.7-gallons vs 2.28817-gallons ( reformulated E10 Ethanol-equivalent)
* 776.819- kWh vs 75.0- kWh
* 2,650,513-Btu vs 255,899-Btu
* 67-mph ave. velocity vs 66.5-mph ave.
* 1,995,330 Btu/ hour vs 447,522 Btu/ hour
* 3.76-mpg vs 17.0-mpg
* 89.11-miles range vs 38.89-miles
* 8,717 Wh/mi vs 1,928 Wh/mi
* 273.2 -bhp ave. vs 145.5-bhp ave.
* BSFC 0.3993- pounds/bhp-hr vs BSFC-e 0.1649- pounds/bhp-hr
* 646,062- Btu / hour out exhaust vs NA
* 646,062- Btu / hour out radiator vs 65,628-Btu / hour
* EPA Comb. 308.1-miles vs 310-miles
* hot-lap 8.6-miles on Tesla 'tank' vs 38.898-miles
* hot-lap 17.775-gallons/ hour vs 3.912-gallons-e
* hot-lap 109.1- pounds fuel/hour vs 24- pounds 'fuel'/ hour-e
* EPA 308.1-miles vs 2,749-miles on Ferrari 'tank-e'
* 'Curb weight':
* 3,818- pounds vs 4,078- pounds @ zero-mph
* 4,078- pounds vs 4,078- pounds @ 121.5-mph
* 4,115.8- pounds vs 4,078- pounds @ 130-mph
* 4,168.4- pounds vs 4,078- pounds @ 141-mph
* 4,602.6- pounds vs NA @ 211-mph
* Michelin Pilot Super Sport K2 [ $ 1,678 (US) current replacement cost ( TIRE RACK )] vs Michelin Pilot Sport 4S (TO)
* Ferrari's road load power curve reflects a geometric, aerodynamic-downforce- dependent rolling resistance component superimposed upon the linear R-R 'curve'
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With respect to cooling systems, one would want to pay attention to the heat flux rejection requirements at the radiators between the two cars, a ratio of 9.8:1, between Ferrari and Tesla.
I used a best case, 35% thermal efficiency for the Ferrari ( US Federal Laboratories ) and a best case 85% thermal efficiency for the Tesla ( US Federal Laboratories )
I'll leave it up to the viewer to draw their own conclusions.

aerohead 05-14-2021 01:10 PM

data addition
 
I've expanded the inventory of data at #1 permalink, to tie the data together in the context of ICE vs BEV cooling.
And a word about Tesla Motors:
The second-gen Model S received a second ( 2nd ) ribbon cooling 'snake', doubling heat rejection efficiency from the battery pack.
The Model 3 employs seven (7) ribbon 'snakes' in it's battery pack

JulianEdgar 05-14-2021 06:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aerohead (Post 647957)
I'll leave it up to the viewer to draw their own conclusions.

Why don't you tell us? ie what exactly are you trying to prove?

(Or is this yet another of the "Guess what is in Aerohead's mind" threads?)

Piotrsko 05-15-2021 11:08 AM

I thought the ribbons were for increasing the charge rate cooling. The batteries get hotter during charge than they do in normal operations.

aerohead 05-19-2021 01:55 PM

number of ribbons
 
The material addressing the Tesla battery pack evolution did not specify which mode became the target for cooling improvement.
They had mentioned the inability to 'hot-lap' the 1st-gen Model S, at Laguna Seca, regardless of what they did to the car, including 17-bags of ice under the pack before the 'Track' driving. The car would automatically cut power to 50% in order to protect itself; which was on track to at least match the performance of the Dodge Charger Hellcat ( a 4.4-mpg car under 'race' conditions ).
For the 2nd-gen Model S, Tesla engineer's second ribbon doubled the heat conduction interface contact area. They also rewrote the software, allowing the 'hotter' motor to use the 'cooler' battery pack as a heat sink. Good for 4-laps.
The Model 3 can be 'raced' as long as there's battery capacity. It recently set a class speed record on the Pikes Peak hill climb.

Piotrsko 05-20-2021 10:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aerohead (Post 648359)
They also rewrote the software, allowing the 'hotter' motor to use the 'cooler' battery pack as a heat sink. Good for 4-laps.
The Model 3 can be 'raced' as long as there's battery capacity. It recently set a class speed record on the Pikes Peak hill climb.

Please explain. I did not know the systems intermingled to any extent

aerohead 05-21-2021 12:41 PM

systems
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Piotrsko (Post 648429)
Please explain. I did not know the systems intermingled to any extent

The Tesla products are software driven, can receive over-the-air updates at any time, and can have a new 'dashboard' every year, as with any 'glass cockpit' environment.
Rather than rely on an outside contractor, Tesla did all the Model S software modifications in house, at their Hawthorne, California engineering headquarters.
Without knowing the particulars, it appears that the coolant pump and octo-valve can be manipulated in such a way that under extreme discharge conditions ( Track Mode ), the delta-T between motor and pack can be taken advantage of in order to dump heat off the motors and transport to the cooler and massive battery pack, thus extending the duration under which this high load condition can be maintained without any damage to the vehicle.
If you like, there are many You-Tube videos of race car drivers 'Tracking' the Model 3 at various race courses, including professional race car driver, Randy Probst, racing a modified Model 3, flat-out, up Pikes Peak. Evidently, the seven ribbon 'snakes' in the Model 3 make it impervious to unacceptable thermal excursions.:)


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