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-   -   DIY Ram Cold Air Intake on 3rd Gen CTD (https://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/diy-ram-cold-air-intake-3rd-gen-ctd-22770.html)

Diesel_Dave 07-29-2012 04:12 PM

DIY Ram Cold Air Intake on 3rd Gen CTD
 
So I finally got my ram cold air intake all assembled on my Cummins. My design is "new", however, I borrowed heavily from two projects I saw over at Cumminsforum (AH64ID & turborep):
Home Deopt CAI on a 3rd Gen - Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum
How To Fab a Cold Air Intake from the Fog Lamp Hole - Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum

I liked AH64ID's modification of the stock air box with the toilet flange for an inexpensive, DIY cold air intake. I also liked turborep's idea of using the fog lamp hole to get some ram air. What I didn't like about turborep's setup, however, is that it made the fog lamp hole look very non-stock from the outside. I wasn't too crazy about the light dryer vent hose either.

I came up with the idea of using a roofing flange "boot" behind the existing fog lamp hole. These boots are the palstic rubber ones used in construction for when you send a pipe out the roof. It seals between the pipe with rubber and than has a plastic flange that fits underneath the shingles.

So, first off I took off the bumper to make it easier to work on. I suppose it might be possible to do it with the bumper still on the truck, but it's fairly easy to remove and it makes things a whiole lot easier to work on. I had to cut down the platic flange on the boot to get a good flat contact surface all the way around the hole. I then used RTV silicone to seal it against the bumper. Here's a view from the back side of the bumper:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...tic-rubber.jpg
and from the front side with the stock fog lamp hole grill off:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...-lamp-hole.jpg
and with the grile back in place:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...amp-grille.jpg
I did have to shave a little bit of plastic off the back of the grille to prevent it from contacting the boot, however, what I like is that it keeps thing looking pretty much stock.

Inside the airbox, mine looks pretty much just like AH64ID's does:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...so-you-can.jpg
And here's the 3" PVC "downpipe" that connects the toilet flange to the boot:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...rbox-front.jpg
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...umper-left.jpg
I used two 45 deg elbows rather than one 90 deg elbow--that made it much easier to line the angles and offsets up properly. I also removed the stock plastic piece that hangs down in the way. turborep chose to saw a hole in it, but I chose to just take it out. If I ever want to go back to stock it doesn't have a hole sawed in it.

And here's the finished view from the outside:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...hink-i-may.jpg
I may end up getting some black PVC-compatible paint to spray the pipe so it's a little less conspicuous. It's really only visible now if you squat down and look directly through the fog lamp hole grille. Of course, I probably should have just gotten some black PVC pipe, but white is what I had lying around.

MGB=MPG 07-29-2012 08:43 PM

1 Attachment(s)
looks good . i also have a CAI exposed to frontal flow down on the chin fin , sure picks up a lot of bugs and road grime , im thinking about putting a low pressure drop prefilter there .
also intend to measure the overpressure encountered using a DIY manometer[U-Tube] .

theroretical overpressure at 55 MPH in freeair is one inch water , my initial measurement showed 2 inH20 at 55 MPH.
i intend to measure overpressure at the duct leading edge , in the pipe , before the engine air filter , after the engine air filter , and in the air box immediately before the carb velocity stack. , both with and w/o the prefilter. unless the pressure drop with the prefilter is outrageous i intend to run with it, i dont like all that road grime gumming up my k&N.

my first attempt used the corrugated alum. duct , the overpressures encountered blew that light weight pipe to bits .different stuff there now.

my inlet shown
http://ecomodder.com/forum/attachmen...1&d=1343608865

Diesel_Dave 07-29-2012 09:29 PM

As far as grime, water, etc., I also got a test plug, that I think I'll keep in the glovebox. If it's wet or dusty I can just pull out the plug and cap off the end. My air filter is also due for a replacement before too long here anyway. I plan on keeping an eye on my filter. If too much junk gets to the filter, I'll just replace it an go back to stock.

MGB=MPG 07-29-2012 10:50 PM

the denser air charge is worth a lot , to me
i have some 1/2 inch thick washable loose woven filter material i use as prefilter on my house cold air returns. , no measurable pressure drop in that application.

oil pan 4 07-29-2012 11:41 PM

I love PVC too.

Ram air on diesels is great, I really missed mine when I started testing turbo intakes.

slowmover 07-30-2012 11:23 AM

I'll be looking forward to your regimen on testing as it should be the definitive statement about whether CAI is a help or no (by default, as others are more interested in peak [or, sustained] power output).

AH64ID is a prominent contributor on any number of well-researched changes on CTD boards, and always worth reading in contemplation of changes.

I decided against any CAI as the engine fan can pull a tremendous amount of dust into the air (vehicle solo), and any off road parking or driving, solo or in tandem with other vehicles, raises far too much dust for me to want to ever introduce more to the air box. Were I to use a CENTRI air pre-cleaner I'd want it above the level of the headlights, maybe recessed in the hood in some manner as with a NACA duct. But underhood plumbing then becomes a problem.

I don't travel off paved roads for any distance, but park the vehicle -- both at home and at work -- on unpaved surfaces.

The factory method of taking incoming air from fender interior panels means that much if not most dust has fallen out . . but fine dust on the air filter is a given.

I have seen where some have weighed the filters before and after as a "method" of trying to determine efficacy versus pressure drop.

This said, I hope you'll pull the flex boots both up and down stream of the turbocharger as a check for dust prior to prolonged testing.

- Are you using the revised MOPAR 4" deep pleated air filter in the otherwise unmodified airbox?

- Will other entry points to the air filter be sealed?

- Is the airbox "pressure drop" gauge still acting (takes little to damage them), and will it be used to help determine air filter service life?

- Will air temps at the filter be monitored?

- What do you think about induced turbulence . . where pressure at one area on the filter panel might be increased? Or [worse] at the edge seal?

- Ever looked at the TAG? Used ahead of the t/c generally, I wonder if it wouldn't have some upstream, not just downstream effects (probably too hard to quantify). Same for DPP Coolhose (see AH64ID and at linked site).

Comments online from those who design compressor housings/installations have favorable opinions about air flow turbulence "correction" (and design laws) such as the TAG (whether or not it is effective for a CTD; the TAG and Coolhose both on my list to try [more restrictive air flow on an '04 compared to factory improved 6.7L intakes]).

- Would you be averse to drilling some water drainage holes in the lower assembly? I have not yet ever seen an OEM cold air intake assembly without such.

Good looking work. Yeah, paint it.

.

Diesel_Dave 07-30-2012 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 319336)
I'll be looking forward to your regimen on testing as it should be the definitive statement about whether CAI is a help or no (by default, as others are more interested in peak [or, sustained] power output).

Right now my plan is just to keep my normal commuting--no special testing, although this is one mod that should be fairly easy to do A-B-A testing on, as I have the plug that essentially "reverses" the mod.

As far as the benefit goes, I've seen enough scientific data to say that the lower pressure and temps both do give a benefit, the question is how much. I suspect it's fairly small. Based on the data I've seen, I'm guessing 1-2% or less. It's really hard to measure those kind of differences in real-world testing without advanced equiptment. If I did do A-B-A testing, I can hook up my OBDWiz software to monitor the intake temps.

I also suspect that this may be of slightly more benefit to me in terms of mileage than some others because I've blocked off my grille--my charge air cooler can't be as effective, and my underhood temps are higher as well. Anything I can do to get some cooler, fresher air should help. I've also given some thought to putting some heat wrap on the pipe from the air box to the compressor and the pipe from the charge air cooler to the intake to cut down on the re-heat.


Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 319336)
I decided against any CAI as the engine fan can pull a tremendous amount of dust into the air (vehicle solo), and any off road parking or driving, solo or in tandem with other vehicles, raises far too much dust for me to want to ever introduce more to the air box. Were I to use a CENTRI air pre-cleaner I'd want it above the level of the headlights, maybe recessed in the hood in some manner as with a NACA duct. But underhood plumbing then becomes a problem.

I don't travel off paved roads for any distance, but park the vehicle -- both at home and at work -- on unpaved surfaces.

The factory method of taking incoming air from fender interior panels means that much if not most dust has fallen out . . but fine dust on the air filter is a given.

I have seen where some have weighed the filters before and after as a "method" of trying to determine efficacy versus pressure drop.

This said, I hope you'll pull the flex boots both up and down stream of the turbocharger as a check for dust prior to prolonged testing.

- Are you using the revised MOPAR 4" deep pleated air filter in the otherwise unmodified airbox?

Given what I know about where you drive, I don't think I'd recommend one for you. Dust, water, bugs, etc. plugging up my air filter is my biggest concern with this mod. I've heard of some people having some issues with this, but nobody can provide me with much info on what type of conditions they were driving in.

Right now I'm still using the air filter that was in the truck when I bought it. I assume it's the MOPAR filter, but I'll have to check. I've heard the WIX filters are pretty good, but I've still got to research what my next filter should be

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 319336)
- Will other entry points to the air filter be sealed?

For now, I've left the existing air box inlet as it was, although, I may see what happens if I block it off. I suspect if I closed it off, I'd have a disadvantage (at least in terms of pressure) when my vehicle speed is low--which it typically is :D. This is because the engine will now have to suck it up the pipe before the air box. So I left it open. The only way where I see that could be a disatvantage is when the vehicle speed is so high that there's so much ram air that the pre-filter airbox pressure is actually above atmospheric and the flow will go out the stock airboc entrance. Frankly, I think I'd really have to be moving fast for that to happen.

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 319336)
- Is the airbox "pressure drop" gauge still acting (takes little to damage them), and will it be used to help determine air filter service life?

- Will air temps at the filter be monitored?

By "pressure drop sensor", I assume you mean the "Filter Minder", or are you talking about the electronic ECM sensor? I do have a Filter Minder, but I'm not sure if it works--I've never seen it move at all. I may be able to pull the airbox temp with OBDWiz, but I'm not sure.


Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 319336)
- What do you think about induced turbulence . . where pressure at one area on the filter panel might be increased? Or [worse] at the edge seal?

- Ever looked at the TAG? Used ahead of the t/c generally, I wonder if it wouldn't have some upstream, not just downstream effects (probably too hard to quantify). Same for DPP Coolhose (see AH64ID and at linked site).

Comments online from those who design compressor housings/installations have favorable opinions about air flow turbulence "correction" (and design laws) such as the TAG (whether or not it is effective for a CTD; the TAG and Coolhose both on my list to try [more restrictive air flow on an '04 compared to factory improved 6.7L intakes]).

- Would you be averse to drilling some water drainage holes in the lower assembly? I have not yet ever seen an OEM cold air intake assembly without such.

Good looking work. Yeah, paint it.

.

I don't expect any turbulence issues. Turbulence is an issue going into the compressor--not into the filter. I think whatever turbulence that goes into the filter will all get "washed out" as it passes through the filter. All the products that you mention are for pre-compressor, not pre-filter (I believe).

As far as water holes go, I'm just going to keep an eye on it and see how it does. There's a ~15" vertical rise from the fog lamp hole up to the filter, so unless there's a lot of water, I wouldn't think much would got all the way up...but I'll have to see. On my setup, it's also continuously "down-hill" towards the bumper, so the water should run out (if it's not being forced upwards). Frankly, I'm not sure how much help the holes do--if there's enough flow to carry the water up to the filter, then it's not going to fall down to exit through the holes.

slowmover 07-30-2012 09:51 PM

Water makes mud of dust is more the thought. Collects. Releases again and again that dust to the intake.

Screening for mud daubers, too, if you have them up there. Look at RV furnace screens for ideas.

The MOPAR filter is outstanding. Don't know who makes it but it is the one to have (unless you want to get tricky and try the Amsoil/Donaldson panel, or the AFE panel; both dry type).

As to "definitive" on CAI, well, that was a strong word. But no one else out there is testing purely for FE. And even if they were, again, none are as sensitive to changes would be my guess. A-B-A almost isn't needed. I agree it may not be large, but know with the heat problem contextualised I understand it.

Yes, couldn't think of name of filter minder. Most any strong alkaline cleaner will "cook" them, so many do not work after a few passes under a car wash wand. They are also a source of potential leaks (uncontrolled air).

Turbulence is a problem to the compressor, and the additional length of the "draw" if the box is sealed might change what the t/c sees under boost (was the thought).

Diesel_Dave 07-30-2012 10:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 319464)
Screening for mud daubers, too, if you have them up there. Look at RV furnace screens for ideas.

I'd never heard them called "mud daubers" before, but we have a couple up here--and various other bugs. An idea that I came up with today is to cut out a piece of window screen and attach that to the top of the toilet flange. That won't help with dust, but will keep the bugs out of the filter.

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 319464)
The MOPAR filter is outstanding. Don't know who makes it but it is the one to have (unless you want to get tricky and try the Amsoil/Donaldson panel, or the AFE panel; both dry type).

I've done some research and, so far, have found a dissapointing about of hard data out there. Everybody seems to have their opinion, but I always try to find the hard data. I would have thought that micron ratings and pressure drops at rated flows, would be fairly easy to get a hold of. Unfortunately I haven't found any numbers yet, although I believe the specs are printed on the side of the Mopar filter. I know Fleetgaurd makes a filter too. I'm not sure whether it's the same as the Mopar branded filter (I don't think so). Fleetgaurd is now owned by Cummins--it's now called "Cummins Filtration" rather than Fleetgaurd, so I would think that's a good quality filter as well. I run their Stratapore lube filter which is, IMO, by far the best on the market.

ron 07-30-2012 11:14 PM

I dont know if this translates to Diesel but Ill add it. I installed a ram air intake on my 2003 toyota techoma the first drive I gained 4mpg from 21 to 25 at 65mph the next time the confuser had detected the lean condition and adjusted the fuel ratio.NOTE now when I drive at 35 mph the ram air will hold the speed at 35 with no throttle, nice for in town.

Diesel_Dave 07-30-2012 11:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ron (Post 319479)
I dont know if this translates to Diesel but Ill add it. I installed a ram air intake on my 2003 toyota techoma the first drive I gained 4mpg from 21 to 25 at 65mph the next time the confuser had detected the lean condition and adjusted the fuel ratio.NOTE now when I drive at 35 mph the ram air will hold the speed at 35 with no throttle, nice for in town.

This study by Oak Ridge National Labs found that fuel economy for fuel-injected gasoline cars was basically unaffected by intake restriction:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/showthrea...omy-22633.html

They were more focused on plugged air filters, but I think the pressure effects of ram air is basically the same thing in reverse.

The results make sense to me: less intake restriction and your throttle will just be further closed. Therefore the TOTAL restriction (from outside the vehicle to intake manifold) remains the same. Diesels are a different story however.

ron 07-30-2012 11:56 PM

my intake is 3in by 16in rectangle scoop reduced down to 3in flexible alum dryer vent into the side of the filter box, from bumper up to the box, no water problems or bugs.does the computer adjust the fuel ratio? I think any increase in fuel/air ratio will help the diesel

oil pan 4 07-31-2012 12:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ron (Post 319486)
I think any increase in fuel/air ratio will help the diesel

With diesels you want to cram as much air into the cylinders as possible, there is no throttling, just a turbo to further stuff even more air into the cylinders. You just dump in more fuel to go faster or pull harder.
We do not have to worry about air fuel ratios.

ron 07-31-2012 12:34 AM

BLACK SMOKE = to much fuel. my post should have read air/fuel ratio. I have a 99CTD do the newer TD use any computer control for fuel.

Diesel_Dave 07-31-2012 01:15 PM

My truck (2007.5) was the first one with a VG turbo and has closed-loop AFR control. That being said, there's still an benefit, because if the air can get to the compressor better, then the VG won't have to close down as far to deliver the same air. Therefore, exhaust manifold pressure goes down and, therefore, pumping loses go down--you pushing against less pressure during the exhaust stroke. It all sounds complicated, but I've seen it proven with an engine in a test cell.

If the diesel doesn't have a VG turbo, then you correct--the benefit comes from higher AFR.

Diesel_Dave 08-01-2012 09:43 AM

For what it's worth, I set another new record on my morning commute this morning. 57.8 mpg on the overhead. My previous best was 57.2 mpg. I think it's too soon to say it's attributable to the intake, but it's a good sign. This dispite the fact that it was quite cool this morning and I got slammed by one red light, that probably cost me ~2 mpg.

oil pan 4 08-01-2012 07:53 PM

Before I put ram air on my non turbo diesel I measured 11 inches of water worth of restriction in side the air cleaner at full speed.
After ramair I had no measurable restiction.
Replacing the very restrictive intake on my non-turbo with the ram air delivered an instant 2mpg highway fuel economy boost.

Now I have a turbo just like yours and I am in the process of building a very over sized ram air fed air cleaner with a paper element. There is too much fine dust around here to run something like a K&N air filter so I went with the largest off the shelf air cleaner I could find.

Removing the ram air pipe for A-B-A testing would waste fuel.
How much fuel, I don't know if I care to find out.

Diesel_Dave 08-02-2012 12:02 AM

What did you use to measure that restriction?

oil pan 4 08-02-2012 02:16 AM

I found a filterminder and installed it.
The sad thing was those readings were with a brand new air filter.

MGB=MPG 08-08-2012 05:26 PM

i just ran some measurements today on my ram induction

i wonder if you have a turbo charger .. that would make a difference

anyway.. i have a NA 110CID old school gasser with a ram air down on the deck
2 in pipe feeding to an air box in front of a Skinners Union Carb

my ambient temps were about 100F on the intake

my test points were out side the pipe at the funnel and inside the pipe
with and with out a pre filter..

on the test point outside the pipe i saw
1 inch water at 40MPH
2 inH20 at 50
2.5 inh20 at 55
3 inh20 at 60
3.5 inh20 at 65

then i moved the sampling point inside the pipe

i saw i inch H20@40
1.5 in H20 @ 55
2 inh2o at 60..

then i put the prefilter on
saw
1 INH2O @40
1.5 INH2o@50
2 INH20@60

as i was going along with the sample tube in the pipe i became aware that it made a BIG difference if i was in neutral throttle or trailing throttle

i mean what throttle setting i had . i became aware that as my manifold pressure went down ..so did the over pressure in the pipe

at WOT 0 INHG manifold i was pulling vacuum in the pipe [ level not noted maybe 2-3 inh2o]

at my cruise setting of 15 INHG manifold i was showing

1.5 inH20 Over pressure in the pipe

i noticed at 55-60 mPH cruise AND 15 INhg MANIFOLD I WAS SHOWING 1.5 INh20 oVER PRESSURE
ON A HILL CLIMB 5% grade 40 mph top gear 10 inhg showing 1/2 in H2O over pressure

finding that throttle setting and the resultant manifold pressure transfers directly in to the induction pipe near the inlet makes my test series much more complex..
i need a data logger .. in my vintage vehicle a data logger is a rider with a stubby pencil
..
of some interest ..when the sampling pipe was Outside the pipe , i noticed i could detect overpressure increase Bow waves off of oncoming traffic and over pressure reduction when i entered the draft following a vehicle
[slipstream]

this test sequence is much more complex than i had counted on

.... next i intend to move sampling point to the air box ahead of the filter
try to record ..
speed . manifold pressure and measured pressures
then after the filter in the air box

INTUITIVELY .. i perceive this manometer very useful ..
as long as i can read an induction pressure Positive , i think i am in the increase FE zone

what do you think
who can plan a proper test sequence for me ?

my final config will be with a sensor pipe after the filter in the air box and a nice little u-tube manometer on the panel [yet to be fabricated]

i expect to see the same kind of values before the filter . hard to know what i will sample after the filter..

comments ..remarks .. suggestions?

Diesel_Dave 08-12-2012 06:07 PM

Update
 
I got the finishing touches done. I added a "pre-filter" and also painted the end.

I was somewhat concerned with getting insects and debris up into the filter. After running for two weeks (600 miles) with the ram intake, I was happy to see that when I opened the airbox back up, the main air filter visually seems identical to what it was originally. Nevertheless, I came up with a good idea to make sure I keep stuff out of the main air filter. At first I was going to use a piece of window screen, but then I was an old washable plastic mesh furnace filter that I had lying around. I cut out a piece, like this:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...cts-pieces.jpg
Then I cut out a donut of plywood, and used it to sandwich the furnace filter piece against the toilet flange:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...let-flange.jpg
Here's what it looks like inside the airbox. I took the main air filter out just for this picture so that you can see it.
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...ike-airbox.jpg

I also got some Krylon Fusion black spray paint that can be used on plastic. I used that to spray paint the end of the pipe so it's less visible. Here's the finished, near-invisible look:
http://ecomodder.com/forum/member-di...ay-painted.jpg

As far as the FE numbers, I think there is an advantage. My average of the last ~600 miles with the ram CAI installed, I've averaged 50.28 mpg on the overhead. This is a 4.1% improvement over 48.29 mpg for the previous 600 miles. Both periods had similar tempeatures (79 deg F avg temp). I don't think it's fair, however, to ascribe the whole 4.1% improvement to the intake. Recently, I've really racheted up the hypermiling intensity in an effort to break the single tank range record. If I had to guess, I'd say probably 1% FE improvement from the intake, but it's hard to say much of anything definitative about such small differences.

slowmover 08-12-2012 09:35 PM

Give it two cents (%), DD, we'll let'cha.

Diesel_Dave 08-13-2012 11:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 321283)
Give it two cents (%), DD, we'll let'cha.

After I get done with this tank, I think I'm going to back off on the hypermiling intensity somewhat. At that point, I think I may do some A-B-A type testing with some of my mods (this one and others). Right now, I'm pushing things to the limit for the sake of the record, but at some point I'd like to do some experimentation to be able to have good, reliable numbers to share with others.

slowmover 08-13-2012 10:57 PM

Yeah, buddy, glad your feelings translated that way . . it was my mine as I rolled along yesterday on a bulk load run considering the potential advantage of these "upgrades" to our truck/brand/type. The intensity needs boundaries. I've had to change my boundaries of late. And will have to run the truck in a different manner than in years past to keep reliability/longevity at peak efficiency . . some of my operating parameters were falling over on themselves (in this light).

I do think, and strongly, that your plan including bellypan and [generically] aerolid will "complete" a natural course of completion. "Completion" in that one has taken a solo/unladen pickup and maximized its' potential for a particular service. Your idea of A-B-A to generate numbers (as with temp records) is a true service.

It really doesn't matter what the Great Unwashed think about stratospheric mpg numbers, but it is a service of the finest type to offer numbers of what can work (and leaves out the question of personal skill).

The paint looks great, and the furnace filter chunk was well-chosen.

.

Diesel_Dave 08-14-2012 09:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slowmover (Post 321461)
I do think, and strongly, that your plan including bellypan and [generically] aerolid will "complete" a natural course of completion. "Completion" in that one has taken a solo/unladen pickup and maximized its' potential for a particular service.

I DO still intend on continuing ecomodding (vehicle modifications), however, I was talking about decreasing the intensity of my hypermiling (driving modifications). I'll still intend on driving efficiently, but just not to the extreme levels I have been.

There are several reasons for this, which I won't get into fully here, but most of them stem from the fact that my personality is such that I tend to push things to extremes. When I do something, I go all out. When I was younger and played video games I didn't play that many games, but those I did I would beat every level to perfection or I wasn't happy. When I was in college I channeled it into academics and got staight A's for 4 straight years. There are also some negative examples, but I won't share those ;) It can be a blessing or a curse depending on how I channel it. I guess what I'm saying is that I've learned I need to set some boundaries for myself--particularly in the hypermiling department, otherwise I'm going to push things too far.

If this current tank (which should finish up this week) comes in as I suspect it will, I think I'll have proven just about everything there is to prove, and it'll be time for me to back off and take a breather.

rvpps2rocks 08-14-2012 02:43 PM

im planning to do something similar, though i am not diesel and i have fog lights so i will have to route to the center grill

Diesel_Dave 08-14-2012 03:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rvpps2rocks (Post 321540)
im planning to do something similar, though i am not diesel and i have fog lights so i will have to route to the center grill

If you're not diesel and/or turbocharged, I don't think it will buy you any FE. It will get you more power, but not FE.

slowmover 08-14-2012 04:44 PM

Yeah, Dave . . what I meant exactly. Course of completion meaning not that one is done, but that one has reached a plateau (and that this is a good thing).

oil pan 4 08-14-2012 05:24 PM

I ran my ram-air open for years, just had some bugs and sand, nothing that would clog it up. But mine was also about 4 feet off the ground and hidden behind the grill.

Domman56 09-11-2012 04:58 PM

Love this write up, I think it's very reliable information for what worked out for your vehicle

Diesel_Dave 10-09-2012 10:33 AM

Update: Last Friday I drove over an hour in a moderately heavy rain (with the intake wide open). I thought it would be a good oportunity to open my airbox up and inspect things. It's been 3,000 miles since I installed it.

The air filter was only very slightly damp-barely noticeable to the touch. So I'm reasonably confident that the water is staying out. Also, the air filter visually seems to be in the same shape it was 3,000 miles ago, so it doesn't appear like I'm picking up any more dirt. Also, my pre-filter looked clean too, so I haven't been picking up much debris.

Overall, I'm pretty satisfied.

slowmover 10-14-2012 12:00 PM

2013 ctd
 
Taken from an article on TDR [TurboDieselRegister] from a September press review of the 2013 DODGE Ram:


" . . Diesel-equipped Ram Heavy Duty pickups feature an industry-exclusive Ram Active air intake system, activated by new monitoring capabilities added to the engine controller. When the intake system senses extreme heat, it draws cool air from the front of the vehicle—a function that also engages at high altitudes for superior throttle response in low oxygen environments. When conditions are wet from snow, ice or water fording, the system pulls air from the standard/conventional underhood inlet, clear from snow packing and water ingestion."

1] Intake flow path changes for high heat
2] Intake flow path changes for wet conditions
3] Intake flow path changes for oxygen percentage reduction

Slick!!


INTRODUCING THE NEW 2013 RAM HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS

.

Diesel_Dave 10-14-2012 08:18 PM

Interesting! I couldn't find any more details yet, but I guess is the "second" air path is similar to what I made. Guess I was one step ahead of them :D

oil pan 4 10-15-2012 11:14 AM

What do you believe the gain was for your rammed air intake?
I want to use your data for a CAI/rammed air ecomodder wiki for diesels.

Don't want people thinking they should be putting a warm air or hot air intake on their diesels for FE.

Diesel_Dave 10-15-2012 11:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 334171)
What do you believe the gain was for your rammed air intake?
I want to use your data for a CAI/rammed air ecomodder wiki for diesels.

Don't want people thinking they should be putting a warm air or hot air intake on their diesels for FE.

I still haven't gotten around to doing any A-B-A testing, but I still agree with what I posted earlier:

Quote:

As far as the FE numbers, I think there is an advantage. My average of the last ~600 miles with the ram CAI installed, I've averaged 50.28 mpg on the overhead. This is a 4.1% improvement over 48.29 mpg for the previous 600 miles. Both periods had similar tempeatures (79 deg F avg temp). I don't think it's fair, however, to ascribe the whole 4.1% improvement to the intake. Recently, I've really racheted up the hypermiling intensity in an effort to break the single tank range record. If I had to guess, I'd say probably 1% FE improvement from the intake, but it's hard to say much of anything definitative about such small differences.

ron 10-15-2012 11:35 AM

the cold air setup( Ram air) I built for my (gas) techoma added 4mpg until the computer added the fuel back in. what I can say is that at 35mph I can drive on the flat and maintain that speed with no gas pedal. If the gain is 1-2% for TCD Im in

slowmover 10-17-2012 06:49 AM

Came across a bit yesterday, that FE falls off for TD's at 125F intake. Wish I could remember where (ha!)

oil pan 4 10-23-2012 07:00 AM

We now have a ram air wiki for diesels.
Check it out and let me know if any of your info needs to be changed.

http://ecomodder.com/wiki/index.php/...ir_and_Ram_Air

Diesel_Dave 10-23-2012 09:06 AM

The wiki says my time was only about 1 hour. I didn't time it, and I did it in multiple stages, but it took quite a bit longer than that. Actual work time was probably 2-3 hours, but you'd need a couple more hours to let RTV set up.

Also, you put down that I saw a 4.1% improvement from the intake. While I did see a 4.1% improvement, I was also changing some other things at the same time. I'd only feel comfortable quoting 1-2% improvement from the intake itself.

oil pan 4 10-23-2012 11:54 AM

No problem.


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