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Old 08-08-2019, 11:36 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Oil gets hot going over relief in a hydraulic system, So if there is a mechanical relief in your transmission that may be a problem. I think the computer controlled transmissions just control the pressure with no relief. High line pressure is only commanded when needed so fuel mileage is out the window at full throttle anyway. It may cause extra load when not needed for normal driving.

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Old 08-21-2019, 02:05 AM   #22 (permalink)
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How much power will it hold? It depends...on size/diameter of the clutch, how worn it is, line pressure, fluid condition, and engine torque. A good one can hold a surprising amount of power before slipping, but a worn one might slip all the time.
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Old 08-21-2019, 06:57 AM   #23 (permalink)
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How much power will it hold? It depends...on size/diameter of the clutch, how worn it is, line pressure, fluid condition, and engine torque. A good one can hold a surprising amount of power before slipping, but a worn one might slip all the time.
That makes sense, thank you. My TCC is a ring about 9 inches in diameter and 1/2 inch wide. I calculated that the surface area of the clutch is about 13.3 square inches.

In my opinion the TCC seems quite small to me considering the size of a manual transmission clutch for the same car, especially since it's a wet clutch. Unless the hydraulic pressure holds the TCC with way more force than a manual trans clutch is held?
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Old 08-21-2019, 11:55 AM   #24 (permalink)
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It really depends on clutch material, line pressure and how much surface area there is for the fluid to push on.

Clutch material can vary quite a bit. You can buy "soft" clutches for manual transmissions or you can buy a ceramic clutch that you cannot slip and it grabs instantly(like in the big trucks).

More line pressure equals more clamping force. The same goes for fluid surface area. The more area there is for the fluid to clamp the clutch together, the more it will hold.

You can buy torque converters for pickups that have multi-disc clutches that can hold a ton of power.

A smaller tcc or smaller car will have less holding power, but they make less power to begin with.

If you want to find out for sure, use a tcc switch and give it the beans in each gear, watching for slippage.
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Old 08-21-2019, 05:29 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Quote:
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It really depends on clutch material, line pressure and how much surface area there is for the fluid to push on.

Clutch material can vary quite a bit. You can buy "soft" clutches for manual transmissions or you can buy a ceramic clutch that you cannot slip and it grabs instantly(like in the big trucks).

More line pressure equals more clamping force. The same goes for fluid surface area. The more area there is for the fluid to clamp the clutch together, the more it will hold.

You can buy torque converters for pickups that have multi-disc clutches that can hold a ton of power.

A smaller tcc or smaller car will have less holding power, but they make less power to begin with.

If you want to find out for sure, use a tcc switch and give it the beans in each gear, watching for slippage.
That makes sense, thank you! I never feel any slipping when the TCC is locked, even flooring it at peak torque. However, my concern is that I may not necessarily feel if it is slipping. The PCM on many cars (including mine) slips the TCC quite a bit by default and it is never felt. If it is in fact slipping under load am I likely to feel it, or will it slip itself to death with no warning that it is self destructing? Thanks in advance!
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Old 08-21-2019, 10:42 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Do you have a tach or a way to see your rpm? If your rpm's never change when you goose it, you're fine.
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Old Yesterday, 01:46 PM   #27 (permalink)
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Do you have a tach or a way to see your rpm? If your rpm's never change when you goose it, you're fine.
Thanks. When I floor it with the converter locked the RPM never changes until the car starts accelerating, like a manual transmission. But Is it possible that it is slipping and not showing on the tach? Like if it is only slipping a tiny bit?
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Old Yesterday, 01:48 PM   #28 (permalink)
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If your tach doesn't move, then it's most likely not slipping. Being a wet clutch, a little bit shouldn't hurt it like it would on a dry manual clutch. Still not good, but not as bad.

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