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Old 07-08-2008, 05:43 PM   #1 (permalink)
BamZipPow
T-100 Road Warrior
 
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Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 1,902

BZP T-100 (2010) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 24 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2011) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 23.66 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2009) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 19.01 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2012) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 25.45 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2013) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 25.79 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2014) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 23.18 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2015) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 23.85 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2016) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 17.62 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2017) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
90 day: 20.78 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2018) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
90 day: 20.19 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 current (2019) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5

BZP T-100 (2020) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
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Question Active redirection of airflow...

I remember seeing some articles about some trucks experimenting with using compressed/redirected air to decrease the amount of drag. Has anyone here thought about using some compact fans to reduce/redirect high/low pressure areas?

I'm about to experiment with some high speed 92mm computer fans to play around with this idea...especially in the engine compartment.

I know most aero mods are passive ones that use fixed structures to redirect/shape the airflow around the vehicle. Like air dams, body pans, and vortex generators.

Active aero mods could "assist" in reducing areas of drag...as you could slow down or speed up the fan to generate the amount of assist based on speed...

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