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Old 01-29-2018, 07:08 PM   #2 (permalink)
redpoint5
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The problem is that isn't very fast, despite the insane specs. It still needs to be 2-4x faster. Current CCS chargers are typically 500v/100A, or 500v/125A, which is a fraction of what they are talking about here (800v/275A) to achieve the 220 kW output target.

Current chargers aren't even capable of charging a Bolt at maximum rated speed. Then around the 50% SOC mark the charge rate tapers off.

Who is going to build this monster charging infrastructure? Even if you can find enough sites to locate these chargers, how much will it cost per kWh? Commercial rate schedules have a demand charge, which is expensive and is based on the maximum output capacity. Put a few of these chargers in 1 location, and you're paying a demand charge for over 1 megawatt of output.

Consider me a skeptic of EVs being great for long distance travel anytime within the next decade. Battery chemistry just isn't at a point where it can be recharged quickly enough, while retaining longevity and high storage density. Even if that hurdle is overcome and costs come down, the infrastructure isn't designed for these monster chargers. Even if that hurdle is overcome, it will cost too much to charge compared to buying a few gallons of petrol.
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