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jumpjack 04-15-2013 07:47 AM

Electric Vehicles mileage database?
 
I found some physic/math formulas which allow me to calculate how much power and energy a vehicle needs to move at different speeds.
As all of you know this depends on vehicle Cd and Frontal Area, so I actually have a quite large range of values.
I'm looking for real data of different EVs at different speeds to compare to my simulation results: does it exist such kind of database around? And, most difficult, does it exist for motorbikes? (I wonder why motorbikes are so rare in vehicle mechanics literature!)

I currently have this data for an electric minicar (400 kg) with Cd=0.3 and FA=2.2 m^2:
Code:

km/h        mph        Wh/km        Wh/mi        W
10        6        23        37        230
20        12        25        40        509
30        19        30        48        887
36        22        33        53        1182
40        25        35        56        1414
50        31        43        69        2139
54        34        46        74        2495
60        37        52        83        3111
70        44        63        101        4381
80        50        75        120        5997
90        56        89        143        8010
100        62        105        168        10468
108        67        118        189        12789
110        69        122        196        13422
120        75        141        226        16920
130        81        162        260        21013
140        87        184        295        25749
150        94        208        333        31179

This is for motorbike (Cd=0.7, FA=0.7)
Code:

km/h        mph        Wh/km        Wh/mi        W
10        6        23        37        228
20        12        25        40        492
30        19        28        45        830
36        22        30        48        1083
40        25        32        51        1278
50        31        37        59        1873
54        34        40        64        2161
60        37        44        71        2652
70        44        52        83        3652
80        50        61        98        4909
90        56        72        115        6460
100        62        83        133        8342
108        67        94        151        10111
110        69        96        154        10592
120        75        110        176        13246
130        81        126        202        16342
140        87        142        228        19915
150        94        160        256        24004

W formula:
E1=(C$3+0,5*L$2*L$3*L$4*I1*I1)*I1
  • C3=Rolling Friction (= roll friction coefficient 0,015 * weight x 9,81)
  • L2=Cd
  • L3=FA
  • L4=air density = 1,167
  • I1= speed in m/s

Wh/km formula:
D1=E1/J1
  • J1 = speed in km/h

If there are no mileage data around, it will be enough to have Cd and FA for vehicles (bot cars and bikes), I'll calculate mileage by above formulas.

edit:
Values for flat road, constant speed.
update: added wh/km

edit2:
deleted "thousands dots"
added mph column

Ryland 04-15-2013 09:07 AM

Not sure why, but both of those charts seem to give figures that are low.

jumpjack 04-15-2013 02:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryland (Post 366729)
Not sure why, but both of those charts seem to give figures that are low.

I think it's because they are calculated for a constant speed on a flat road with 0% slope: impossible in real life! ;)
But you can consider these values as "mimimum energy consumption": you can't go lower, only higher.

As per my experience, average cosumptions are (more or less):
1000-2000 W Ebike: 30-50 Wh/km
3000-5000 W Ebike: 60-70 Wh/km
4-6 kW minicar (45 km/h): 80 Wh/km
6-8 kW minicar (80 km/h): 100 Wh/km
small car: 150 Wh/km
big car: 200 Wh/km

But having real and more detailed data would be really interesting!

mort 04-15-2013 05:39 PM

Hi jumpjack,
So its in mostly conventional units but look: The ecomodder calculator.
Your chart doesn't seem to have any weight of vehicle. If I run with your Cd and area, I see this.
550 KG (1200 lb) is a very light car.
-mort

sheepdog 44 04-15-2013 08:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ryland (Post 366729)
Not sure why, but both of those charts seem to give figures that are low.

I think because it's in metric kilometers, which gives smaller values making everything seem more efficient.
Quote:

Originally Posted by mort (Post 366806)
Hi jumpjack,
So its in mostly conventional units but look: The ecomodder calculator.
Your chart doesn't seem to have any weight of vehicle. If I run with your Cd and area, I see this.
550 KG (1200 lb) is a very light car.
-mort

Speaking about very light cars, check out the ridiculously efficient wh/m rating vs speed graph for the Edison2. 200 miles range at 60mph with 16kwh.
Edison2 - Very Light Blog - And The Consequences Are

Use the Calculator at the top of the forum. Use the KWH needed at speed / the speed to get the wh/km or mi rating.

jumpjack 04-16-2013 03:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mort (Post 366806)
Hi jumpjack,
So its in mostly conventional units but look: The ecomodder calculator.
Your chart doesn't seem to have any weight of vehicle. If I run with your Cd and area, I see this.
550 KG (1200 lb) is a very light car.
-mort

I updated the tables adding Wh/mi.
The weight of the vehicle is included by means of rolling friction (--> rolling power), but it slightly affects result, as it depends on "v", while air friction depends on "v^3".

This table shows how much rolling friction affects total power:
Code:

Pair+Proll          Proll        Proll/Ptot
 228          221        97%
 492          443        90%
 830          664        80%
 1083          797        74%
 1278          886        69%
 1873          1107        59%
 2161          1196        55%
 2652          1328        50%
 3652          1550        42%
 4909          1771        36%
 6460          1993        31%
 8342          2214        27%
 10111          2391        24%
 10592          2435        23%
 13246          2657        20%
 16342          2878        18%
 19915          3100        16%
 24004          3321        14%

Rolling friction force:
Froll = mu * m * 9,81
mu = 0,015 (rolling friction coefficient)
m = vehicle weight in kg

Simplified formula:
Froll = 0,15 * m

jumpjack 04-16-2013 03:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mort (Post 366806)
I see [URL="http://ecomodder.com/forum/tool-aero-rolling-resistance.php?Weight=550&WeightUnits=kg&CRR=.015& Cd=.3&FrontalArea=2.2&FrontalAreaUnits=m^2&FuelWh= 33557&IceEfficiency=.22&DrivetrainEfficiency=.95&P arasiticOverhead=0&rho=1.225&FromToStep=5-200-5"]this.

Cool, I didn't see the link. :) I eventually have something to compare my results to!

But you're right, I published results for a "very slight car" as I was studying power/energy for minicars!:o

Using a "real" car (1000 kg) I get of course higher results, but they also differ depending on battery weight, which depends on how much range you need, and so on....

But switching back to the original question: apart from simulated results, do they exist any experimental results to play with?

jumpjack 04-16-2013 04:03 AM

I just found this amazing site!
Automobile-Catalog the complete Catalog of Cars, car specs database

Does it exist anything similar for motorbikes?

sheepdog 44 04-16-2013 08:01 AM

This won't give you speed/whkm, but it gives you an idea of what all the EV's can do on a light drive cycle.
Testing Electric Vehicles in the Real World

jumpjack 04-16-2013 08:04 AM

I just found this amazing site!
Automobile-Catalog the complete Catalog of Cars, car specs database

Does it exist anything similar for motorbikes?


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