Thread: Air Dam
View Single Post
Old 02-17-2015, 01:44 PM   #13 (permalink)
BamZipPow
T-100 Road Warrior
 
BamZipPow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: The Woodlands, TX
Posts: 1,902

BZP T-100 (2010) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 24 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2011) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 23.66 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2009) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 19.01 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2012) - '98 Toyota T-100 ext cab - 3.4L/auto SR5
Last 3: 25.45 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2013) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 25.79 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2014) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 23.18 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2015) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 23.85 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2016) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Last 3: 17.62 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2017) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
90 day: 20.78 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 (2018) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
90 day: 20.19 mpg (US)

BZP T-100 current (2019) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5

BZP T-100 (2020) - '98 Toyota T-100 SR5
Thanks: 3,425
Thanked 1,365 Times in 949 Posts
Send a message via ICQ to BamZipPow
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by freebeard View Post
BamZipPow -- But if the C-channel just holds the edge and there are fasteners right behind it to hold the panel up, isn't it just a matter of sizing the parts? Especially if it is protected by the airdam?

For the material, my vote is for PolyMetal™. It has the strength of 5/8" plywood and 1/10th the weight. It's more expensive than plywood though.
As the frame flexes going down the road and over pot holes and bumps, the edge (depending on the amount of overlap) could drop down and cause issues. It's more of being aware that there are different considerations based on the amount of flex which is usually unknown until you see the aftermath of destruction of engineering you thought you had. I guess you could test it by jacking up one wheel and seeing how much it affects the pan after you install it.
__________________
Dark Aero-The world's first aerodynamic single wheel boat tail!

  Reply With Quote