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Old 01-30-2018, 08:17 PM   #20 (permalink)
redpoint5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JSH View Post
I purposely purchased by Spark EV without DC charging and don't feel that the car is "hobbled" in any way. I've charged my car at a public station twice in 18 months and that was just to get the parking spot.
I'm right on the fence on if I want a used leaf or Spark for my first EV (maybe Focus or i3). Leaf wins the parts availability category as they begin to hit the junk yards, but I suspect the Spark battery will far outlast the Leaf, which is the single biggest concern with EV ownership. There is a bit of a price premium on the Spark, perhaps due to better thermal management, or perhaps from looking a little better than the Leaf, or maybe better performance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JSH View Post
A huge portion of that depreciation is the $7500 to $10,000 tax credit that goes right into the buyer's pocket. The real selling price of a LEAF in Oregon is $20K not the $30K MSRP. In 5 years it should be worth about $10K

I agree many are. However, that is because most people only consider the purchase price not the total cost of ownership.

Prices are dropping. The 2018 Nissan Leaf goes 40% farther on a charge, is 2.5 seconds faster 0-60, and costs less than the old model.
The general public is financially illiterate. They would rather pay less up front, but spend more over time than to spend more up front and pay less over time. Secondly, the average household doesn't have the requisite $7,500 tax liability to fully benefit from the federal credit. It's essentially a subsidy for the wealthy. I don't even pay my fair share with my $66k salary, or have $7,500 in tax liability, which is a very comfortable living.

The EV price tipping point is very near, as you point out with the gen II Leaf. Within the next couple years, the typical consumer will be more inclined to purchase a lower priced EV that has the performance of higher priced gassers.
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