Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > General Efficiency Discussion
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-11-2011, 07:17 PM   #1 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 403

Sweetie - '11 Hyundai Sonata GLS
90 day: 39.35 mpg (US)

My Miles - '03 Combo GLS/KLX/Ninja
90 day: 40.49 mpg (US)

Sipper' - '04 Kawasaki Ninja 250
90 day: 74.98 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1
Thanked 37 Times in 28 Posts
Bias vs Radial

Classic Car Tires 101 | AUTOMOTIVE MILEPOSTS

In a nutshell, the article states a radial has more flex.

If we lower tire pressure, we get more flex, more heat and less mileage.

If we raise tire pressure, we get less flex, less heat and greater mileage.

So, what say ye? Have we been duped into believing radials are better, like having to change oil every 3000 miles, and running door placard pressures, ET doesn't exist, etc....

__________________
This ain't a war, anymore than a war between men and maggots. Or, dragons and wolves. Or, men riding dragons, throwing wolves at maggots!
  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 09-11-2011, 08:00 PM   #2 (permalink)
(:
 
Frank Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: up north
Posts: 12,762

Blue - '93 Ford Tempo
Last 3: 27.29 mpg (US)

F150 - '94 Ford F150 XLT 4x4
90 day: 18.5 mpg (US)

Sport Coupe - '92 Ford Tempo GL
Last 3: 69.62 mpg (US)

ShWing! - '82 honda gold wing Interstate
90 day: 33.65 mpg (US)

Moon Unit - '98 Mercury Sable LX Wagon
90 day: 21.24 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,585
Thanked 3,550 Times in 2,216 Posts
I think motorcycle and to a lesser extent bicycle tires have rotten Crr due to being bias not radial.
__________________


  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2011, 09:16 PM   #3 (permalink)
Gen II Prianista
 
Rokeby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Ballamer, Merlin
Posts: 453
Thanks: 201
Thanked 145 Times in 89 Posts
I for one don't feel in any way "duped" when driving on or buying radial tires.
Should you ever have the pleasure of driving an American circa mid-50s or
earlier car, you will be horrified at how tenuous the bias ply tire's connection
with the road was "back in the day." Although the radial tire was invented in
the mid-40s, it wasn't widely used in the USA until the 60s. Even in the late
60s, OEM radial tires were a major part of muscle car advertising copy.

Most every 'Net site that discussses the differences between bias and
radial ply tires comes up with comparisons like this:

There are two types of tires mostly used in cars and commercial vehicles:
Radial and Bias.

Bias Ply tire: This type of tire has diagonal or bias plies. These plies
crisscross. This makes tire strong in all directions because of the plies
overlap.

Radial ply tire: In a radial tire, the ply cords run in the radial direction.
The plies run parallel to each other and vertical to the tire bead. Stabilizer
belts are applied over the plies to give extra strength parallel to beads.

Now we look at advantages of radial tire over a bias tire:
1. Good high speed capacity
2. Longer lasting and Longer tread life (Up to30%- 50% longer)
3. Steel Belted - Results in tougher overall construction
4. Better floatation ,larger contact area wider footprint
5. Low heat build-up or run cooler
6. Lower rolling resistance
7. Better Fuel Economy
8. Better stability
9. Wear resistant
10. Smoother, more quiet ride

Disadvantage of radial tire over a bias tire:
1. More prone to puncturing at side walls
2. Side wall bulging
3. More difficult to repair
4. Higher purchase price
5. Heavier steering at low speeds but power steering facility is
there so it is acceptable.

Read more: What is the difference between bias and radial tires

Here is link for the more visual learner. Granted, it is Michelin discussing
their agricultural tires, but the visuals work just as well for road tires:
Michelin AG - Advantages - Bias vs Radial

Tires for trailers, ATVs, motorcycles, and classic cars are special cases and
require vehicle specific research.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2011, 09:43 PM   #4 (permalink)
Engineering first
 
bwilson4web's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Huntsville, AL
Posts: 801

14 i3-REx - '14 BMW i3-REx
Last 3: 45.67 mpg (US)

17 Prime Plus - '17 Toyota Prius Prime Plus
90 day: 58.25 mpg (US)
Thanks: 81
Thanked 206 Times in 132 Posts
In 1972, I bought a 1966, VW MicroBus and one of the first changes was to replace all four, cross-bias tires with radials. On the way home, I took a familiar, high-speed turn and nearly rolled it . . . the radials where that much better than the cross-bias tires. Steering had changed from a guessing game to a precise art.

Bob Wilson
__________________
2019 Std. Range Plus Model 3 - 134 MPG3 || 2014 BMW i3-REx - 117 MPGe, 39 MPG
JuiceBox 40 Pro (240 VAC, 40 A), KHONS portable (120-240 VAC, 12-32 A)
Retired engineer, Huntsville, AL (five times AutoPilot saved.)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2011, 10:44 PM   #5 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,927
Thanks: 877
Thanked 2,023 Times in 1,304 Posts
My Aunt bought a 1966 Cadillac new and it wore out the factory bias ply tires in 6000 miles. She replaced them with Michelin X tires and drove it on them until it had 70,000 miles. She replaced them because they were 13 years old and dry rotting, not worn out.

You couldn't get me to drive a car on bias play tires. I even put radials on my 37 Ford, and promptly lost a hubcap going around a turn a little too fast.

regards
Mech
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2011, 10:52 PM   #6 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,927
Thanks: 877
Thanked 2,023 Times in 1,304 Posts
Radial tires create less heat when flexing because the plies are perpendicular to the road at point of contact. Bias ply tires have plies that are perpendicular to each other and at 45 degree angles to the road at point of contact. The plies fight each other when flexing which creates heat and accelerates wear. Since the sidewall plies in the radial tire are not fighting each other there is much less heat created.

regards
Mech
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2011, 12:02 PM   #7 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Earth
Posts: 5,209
Thanks: 225
Thanked 810 Times in 594 Posts
The link makes a number of statements which in my (somewhat educated) opinion are just flat wrong. For instance
Quote:
This type of tire construction makes the sidewall area of the casing very strong, which allows the tire to support more weight.
Now it seems obvious to me that the tire's sidewall isn't supporting the car's weight. That's being supported by the pressure of the air in the tire - otherwise, we'd never get flats :-)
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2011, 12:31 PM   #8 (permalink)
UFO
Master EcoModder
 
UFO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,300

Colorado - '17 Chevrolet Colorado 4x4 LT
90 day: 23.07 mpg (US)
Thanks: 315
Thanked 178 Times in 138 Posts
I had an International Scout II that came with bias tires. I thought the steering was worn out; driving it on the highway was like steering a boat, I had to target distant landmarks to keep it straight, and turning had to be planned well in advance. I replaced the tires with radials, and it was a new vehicle. It steered precisely and straight.

In my humble opinion, BIAS TIRES SUCK!
__________________
I'm not coasting, I'm shifting slowly.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2011, 12:41 PM   #9 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,442

2004 CTD - '04 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT
Team Cummins
90 day: 19.36 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,422
Thanked 736 Times in 556 Posts
As above, if you were ever on these tires in the rain, you'd never, ever, choose to have them in place of radials.
  Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2011, 05:05 PM   #10 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 403

Sweetie - '11 Hyundai Sonata GLS
90 day: 39.35 mpg (US)

My Miles - '03 Combo GLS/KLX/Ninja
90 day: 40.49 mpg (US)

Sipper' - '04 Kawasaki Ninja 250
90 day: 74.98 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1
Thanked 37 Times in 28 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Lee View Post
I think motorcycle and to a lesser extent bicycle tires have rotten Crr due to being bias not radial.
I can say without doubt, that my new bias tires on my motorcycle coast almost double what the radials would. Huge difference not only coasting, but in feel/feedback of what the tires are doing.

I have always preferred bias on bikes. I tried radials a couple of times now and like the bias better.

__________________
This ain't a war, anymore than a war between men and maggots. Or, dragons and wolves. Or, men riding dragons, throwing wolves at maggots!
  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com