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Old 10-26-2019, 11:30 PM   #11 (permalink)
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A Workman brand CB power cord. The radio will have one. If you’ll do it my way, it’s better to buy another, as it’s going to get cut up.

10-ga power in to:

1). Transceiver
2). Amplifier
3). WMR speaker.

It will all run off 15A.

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Last edited by slowmover; 10-27-2019 at 12:06 AM..
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Old 10-27-2019, 12:01 AM   #12 (permalink)
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I use the WEST MOUNTAIN RADIO Rig Runner to bring in a heavy gauge power feed and to distribute it among a number of devices.

This sophistication not needed for what Iím recommending in this his thread. This is an example of HAM radio gear.

Power distribution is better accomplished with a buss bar that is covered versus soldering together a snakes nest. Single cable in, and multiple out.

The power needs come thru the firewall, to a covered distribution point. A 20A fuse is all thatís necessary, and it should be installed at the battery.
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Old 10-27-2019, 12:11 AM   #13 (permalink)
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I have several of these TAC-COMM Radio Carriers. I include it as you may wish to have something of the like. More variations out there. A radio does not need to be permanently mounted (though itís better to do so).
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Old 10-27-2019, 12:19 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Antenna: Sirio brand. 5000 series

Magnetic mount is lower performance. People freak out at the correct installation which is in using a puck mount for this tall antenna. This is the place where the details really count. And your car already has dozens of holes in it.
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Old 10-27-2019, 02:00 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Good info.

I too know what a good radio is capable of.




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Old 12-26-2019, 11:57 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Open channel radio communications is hit & miss.

1). With a VERY good system, learning of a problem out ahead far in advance means less of a hit to the Average MPH for that dayís trip. Choices can be made sooner, and over a greater range of options. (This is biggest). A problem of this magnitude is an increase in chatter, overall. Unmistakable.

2). What are the range of choices (re-route) isnít always obvious. Phone apps and GPS tend to a pattern. And that kind of re-route can be as bad as the initial problem both for FE and time. (Wear & tear shoots thru roof). An atlas offers more (shortest not really your friend; what everyone else wants), as a fairly far OOR diversion is the one that is steady-state (the ideal; even if at a slow MPH). Here is where a CB is great. Ginning up a local to get advice on that alternate route. It may have problems not conducive to your use. Etc.

3). Every variation of problem has a CB radio analogy. Youíve hit rain. And now itís deteriorated to heavy rain and dangerous wind gusts. How long does it last (distance). Oncoming traffic can tell you where they hit the problem. So, do you stop and wait, or turtle along. Safety is foremost, but another mile seems okay. (Use MY RADAR PRO or similar to scroll tightly to see whatís up at your exact location). Time for a break? A nap? Stop for the day to get an earlier start tomorrow as inevitably the stupids will be having wrecks. They canít do otherwise.

4). Traffic volume is the thing. Not your tire pressure. Not your set speed. What dictates clear passage is the amount of vehicles per mile. And if ANYTHING but clear sunny skies prevail, the failure rate of the sub-normal climbs and climbs.

ó One can plan to traverse major metro areas at the best time (100-miles; from local 0900 to 1100 best), one can eliminate supply needs en-route and keep breaks down to those of safety (2-hours: 15Ē) and fuel (at 4-hour mark: 1-hour) such that a plan delivers exactitude in predictive arrivals at trip legs end within 5Ē.

ó Road construction information is available at USDOT and at state or local level. Use it.

ó One can in all ways be uncoupled from the flow to achieve highest relative MPG on a good schedule, except for one glaring problem: Traffic Volume.

The instance of needing a VERY good radio system may not be isolated. It may a day of constant updates to a problem 100-miles or more ahead AND staying abreast of alternates being used by others.

It may be continuous series of problems.

Where traffic slows and backs up is where the CB shines.

Itís also an opportunity to be of service.

1). Always know your mile marker.
2). Know where the oncoming traffic stoppage mile marker begins so that others coming TO that problem are warned (I generally stop at about the 12-mile mark from the END of the stoppage: ďwestbound, youíre rolling to a nine-mile back up youíll hit at the 387-mark. Multi-car pileup at the 379, havenít cleared any of it when I went pastĒ ó this to the 367-mark, roughly).

Theres usually plenty of groaning and wisecracks. Problems shared this are halved in stress. Ignore what you donít like and be responsive otherwise.

Etiquette comes down to being understood. Speak deliberately. Follow the patterns of speech in use. Etc.

.

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