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JSH 04-22-2021 11:22 AM

Daimler, PGE Open 'Electric Island' Charging Site
 
This is the first station for the West Coast Clean Transit Corridor Initiative to install charging station for HD trucks along the full length of I-5.

8 pull-through stations with 250 kW chargers. The site has been build with enough electrical service for 1 MW chargers when they become available.

https://www.truckinginfo.com/1014176...-charging-site

https://fleetimages.bobitstudios.com...-720x516-s.jpg

https://fleetimages.bobitstudios.com...-720x516-s.jpg

redpoint5 04-22-2021 11:52 AM

What kind of connectors does it use? 250 kW isn't much for a truck-sized battery.

I see a substation of sorts was required to supply that enormous capacity. What percent of utilization is required to break even on the fixed and variable costs? I think I read somewhere that DCFC typically requires 1/3rd utilization, meaning 8hrs of billable charging per day to break even.

...might as well install the chargers on I-5 so the trucks can top up during the 5hr "rush hour" where I-5 converts to a parking lot.

Piotrsko 04-22-2021 11:53 AM

Big trucks only I hope? Some eedjut in a tesla parked for a 1/2 hour not charging would be annoying more that it already is.

Autobahnschleicher 04-22-2021 11:58 AM

I'm surprised it's only 250 kW.
Ionity has mostly 350 kW chargers with Type-2 CCS for cars here.

JSH 04-22-2021 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redpoint5 (Post 646821)
What kind of connectors does it use? 250 kW isn't much for a truck-sized battery.

CCS. The blue connector has two CCS plugs paired side by side.

https://cdn.motor1.com/images/mgl/Wm...rging-site.jpg

Quote:

Originally Posted by redpoint5 (Post 646821)
I see a substation of sorts was required to supply that enormous capacity. What percent of utilization is required to break even on the fixed and variable costs? I think I read somewhere that DCFC typically requires 1/3rd utilization, meaning 8hrs of billable charging per day to break even.

I doubt either party is looking to make money on this first station. Press statement:

"The site is built to immediately provide charging for EVs of all shapes and sizes, and will serve as an innovation center, allowing both PGE and DTNA to study energy management, charger use and performance, and, in the case of DTNA, its own vehicles’ charging performance."

Quote:

Originally Posted by Piotrsko (Post 646822)
Big trucks only I hope? Some eedjut in a tesla parked for a 1/2 hour not charging would be annoying more that it already is.

Open to anyone and any vehicle with a CCS plug. The article does say some of the 8 chargers will be reserved for Daimler.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Autobahnschleicher (Post 646825)
I'm surprised it's only 250 kW.
Ionity has mostly 350 kW chargers with Type-2 CCS for cars here.


Different articles have different numbers. Some say 150 kW, some 250 kW, and some say 350 kW.

Unless something has changed from earlier press releases they are 150 kW with the dual plugs capable of charging at 300 kW.

oil pan 4 04-23-2021 11:51 PM

On demand power of 250kw to a few megawatts isn't going to all come from renewable power unless you're hydroelectric or geothermal heavy.

JSH 04-24-2021 12:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oil pan 4 (Post 646912)
On demand power of 250kw to a few megawatts isn't going to all come from renewable power unless you're hydroelectric or geothermal heavy.

  • The Bonneville Dam is 40 miles East of Portland. It has 20 turbines and 1242 MW of installed capacity.
  • East of that is The Dalles Dam. 22 turbines and 1878 MW of installed capacity
  • East of that is the John Day Dam. 16 turbines and 2160 MW of installed capacity.
I could keep going up the Columbia river.

Yes, we are very hydroelectric heavy. About 2/3 rds of Oregon's electricity is generated by renewable sources.

redpoint5 04-24-2021 12:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JSH (Post 646913)
  • The Bonneville Dam is 40 miles East of Portland. It has 20 turbines and 1242 MW of installed capacity.
  • East of that is The Dalles Dam. 22 turbines and 1878 MW of installed capacity
  • East of that is the John Day Dam. 16 turbines and 2160 MW of installed capacity.
I could keep going up the Columbia river.

Yes, we are very hydroelectric heavy. About 2/3 rds of Oregon's electricity is generated by renewable sources.

Funny how the Columbia has the #1, #3, and #4 highest output dams in the US, but people only know about Hoover, and maybe Niagara.

freebeard 04-24-2021 04:22 AM

Roll On, Columbia

oil pan 4 04-24-2021 07:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JSH (Post 646913)
  • The Bonneville Dam is 40 miles East of Portland. It has 20 turbines and 1242 MW of installed capacity.
  • East of that is The Dalles Dam. 22 turbines and 1878 MW of installed capacity
  • East of that is the John Day Dam. 16 turbines and 2160 MW of installed capacity.
I could keep going up the Columbia river.

Yes, we are very hydroelectric heavy. About 2/3 rds of Oregon's electricity is generated by renewable sources.

That's great. But how does that help everywhere else?


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