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-   -   Heatsink rails for liquid cooling Paul's controller. (https://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/heatsink-rails-liquid-cooling-pauls-controller-13028.html)

wakinyantanka 04-22-2010 10:25 AM

Heatsink rails for liquid cooling Paul's controller.
 
Hey guys,
Just wanted to let you all know that I've picked up a lathe and a mill for my shop. So I can cut custom cooling rails for liquid cooled versions of Paul's controller. Just contact me so we can work out the details.:)
If this is the wrong place for this post feel free to move it to the appropriate forum.:thumbup:

captainslug 04-22-2010 11:13 AM

All that's needed to watercool the MOSfet heatspreader is a ball-end milled channel or two along the side opposite the mosfets. Then use a torch to silver solder a length or two of 1/4" OD copper tubing into the channel(s). Or just skip the milled channel and sloppily solder the tubes on after flattening them a little.

You can then use instant-tube fittings on its ends to connect it to a pump, reservoir, and radiator.

I wouldn't recommend trying to add cross-drilled channels inside the heat spreader since you don't want to mix aluminum and copper in a water-cooling loop. Doing that would lead to galvanic corrosion unless your coolant mixture isn't atleast 40% antifreeze.
There's also just not much space inside the heat spreader to add them anyways without having to replace the through-bolt holes with shorter tapped holes.

Does anyone have a mechanical drawing of the heat spreader or any information on the hole spacings on it? I could work up a printable machining template for the wiki if I simply have some measurements to work from.

wakinyantanka 04-23-2010 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by captainslug (Post 171620)
All that's needed to watercool the MOSfet heatspreader is a ball-end milled channel or two along the side opposite the mosfets. Then use a torch to silver solder a length or two of 1/4" OD copper tubing into the channel(s). Or just skip the milled channel and sloppily solder the tubes on after flattening them a little.

You can then use instant-tube fittings on its ends to connect it to a pump, reservoir, and radiator.

I wouldn't recommend trying to add cross-drilled channels inside the heat spreader since you don't want to mix aluminum and copper in a water-cooling loop. Doing that would lead to galvanic corrosion unless your coolant mixture isn't atleast 40% antifreeze.
There's also just not much space inside the heat spreader to add them anyways without having to replace the through-bolt holes with shorter tapped holes.

Does anyone have a mechanical drawing of the heat spreader or any information on the hole spacings on it? I could work up a printable machining template for the wiki if I simply have some measurements to work from.

Yes, you definitely would want to use an antifreeze mix on any water cooled set up, even if there is only one metal present.
Also, I have the ability to bore clear through and thread each end so there is no need to use copper elbows. It's a clean, neat option for those that want it. :)

mrbigh 11-19-2010 12:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wakinyantanka (Post 171694)
Yes, you definitely would want to use an antifreeze mix on any water cooled set up, even if there is only one metal present.
Also, I have the ability to bore clear through and thread each end so there is no need to use copper elbows. It's a clean, neat option for those that want it. :)

Have you ever made a tangible sample for demo purposes with pictures that can be posted in this/your thread?
Thanks

wakinyantanka 11-19-2010 09:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrbigh (Post 204890)
Have you ever made a tangible sample for demo purposes with pictures that can be posted in this/your thread?
Thanks

I have made many things on my mill/lathe. No one has asked me to make any cooling rails yet. I can post some pictures of a hardened steel clutch adapter that was just finished if you like. Once I start my controller build I will be making my own rails and will post pictures of those.:)

mrbigh 11-19-2010 10:44 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by wakinyantanka (Post 204919)
I have made many things on my mill/lathe. No one has asked me to make any cooling rails yet. I can post some pictures of a hardened steel clutch adapter that was just finished if you like. Once I start my controller build I will be making my own rails and will post pictures of those.:)

I was thinking on having a "cold plate" for my SR controller but being that I couldn't find anything suitable I went the finned aluminum heat sink way.
But in the future that could change to an Al slab with routed chanels and a copper tubing pressed in for the coolant fluid, that realy was my first concept.
Now I built this instead...................

DJBecker 11-19-2010 03:55 PM

I've seen high-end cold plates that simply used a 'D' shaped groove with copper tubing pressed into place. Pressing the top of the tubing flat crimped it firmly in place inside the groove, with aluminum-filled epoxy used only as a filler for the surface seam.

This does require a milling machine, likely with CNC to make the smooth curves required.

I've thought about sandwiching a PVC sheet inside two relatively thin aluminum plates. The advantage is that it's really easy to mill or cut a custom channel pattern in the PVC. The bonding would be done either by sticking it in the oven with some preheated weight on top (such as two other aluminum plates), or misting/wiping the aluminum with acetone before assembly. The PVC would only need to seal around the edges and through holes, since internal seepage won't make a significant difference in the flow.

Dwffy 07-06-2011 07:33 PM

Hi there Mr Bigh,
It looks to me like you're building a controller using IGBT's.
If this is the case, would you be prepared to help me with some diagrams etc. I have a "Cougar" control board and am hoping to use it to control the power section and to use IGBT's instead of Mosfets. Will appreciate any help you can give.
-Doug

mrbigh 07-06-2011 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dwffy (Post 248747)
Hi there Mr Bigh,
It looks to me like you're building a controller using IGBT's.
If this is the case, would you be prepared to help me with some diagrams etc. I have a "Cougar" control board and am hoping to use it to control the power section and to use IGBT's instead of Mosfets. Will appreciate any help you can give.
-Doug

As soon as I have my operational controller Bd. back from Paul's engineering dept. in Washington State and merge it with the other hardware, I will be more than glad to share the information for others to build something alike.
Patience is sometimes a virtue ...................

Dwffy 07-06-2011 11:27 PM

Wow! thanks a lot, sorry if I have jumped the gun and seem impatient, It was merely because I had not been following the thread.
Regards,
-Doug


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