EcoModder.com

EcoModder.com (https://ecomodder.com/forum/)
-   EcoModding Central (https://ecomodder.com/forum/ecomodding-central.html)
-   -   Insurance, legality and your modifications (https://ecomodder.com/forum/showthread.php/insurance-legality-your-modifications-34332.html)

LittleBlackDuck 09-21-2016 06:14 AM

Insurance, legality and your modifications
 
I have lurked in these forums for quite a while and have made a few interesting observations. I would like to hear other member's points of view on them.

One example is using space saver wheels with tyres that are not designed to be installed on them. This would severely affect the handling and braking capabilities of the vehicle. How does the law look on this in the US? In Australia I opwould expect my vehicle to be put off the road immediately, and any insurance would be void.

Similarly with removing interior parts that are intended to protect the occupants in the event of a collision. I understand that we can all drive conservatively and safely, but there will always be factors outside our control that can cause a collision or require abrupt evasive maneuvering to avoid one. I wonder if some of the approaches taken to achieve reduced fuel consumption have considered this?

Am I being overly cautious, or do others not consider the big picture when modding their vehicles?

I welcome a wholesome discussion on this and ask that we all respectfully express our views.

Simon

aardvarcus 09-21-2016 07:53 AM

Legally, I think it is a big grey area.

For example, most would agree space saver tires are probably not a good idea when used outside of their DOT rated operating conditions. (Some are bias ply, most are speed and distance limited.) Is this any more dangerous than someone who puts extra wide high performance summer tires on their car and drives it in inclement weather, where it would hydroplane like crazy? Or anyone who puts huge non-siped mud tires on their 4x4 to look cool and slides off the road in snowy and icy conditions? Or the drivers who drive on their tires way past the wear bars until the steel pokes out to get every mile out of them risking a blowout?

The focus always seems to go on one or two negative safety modifications that have been attempted, but there have been many positive safety modifications made on this site. Personally, I feel that all the modifications I have made to my vehicle has made it more safe than stock. Air dams noticeably reduce lift in addition to drag, which is one big reason why the new Tacomas and Colorados have them, to improve handling at speed. We are putting them on, but other people on other forums are taking them off.

In my opinion, any modification you make to your vehicle basically puts the risk/liability on you for that modification. If you modify your car in a dumb way and you cause an issue directly because of that medication, why should anyone but you be responsible?

Many others may disagree with me, which is fine as we all have different ideas and perspectives we have formed through our personal experiences. I attempt to keep my vehicle looking close to stock in order not to attract negative attention, and I always attempt to source and use stock parts when possible to achieve my goals.

LittleBlackDuck 09-21-2016 08:13 AM

Aardvarcus, thanks for the comments.

I agree that sensible aerodynamic modifications can provide significant benefits for reasonable cost with very low risk. The only area that needs to be considered is the potential to injure pedestrians. Most of the under-car stuff is no issue but some of the more radical mods need to consider this.

Everybody needs to critically evaluate the mods and how they may impact others, and this is what I am trying to highlight. I cringe when I read about a novice that is going to perform a plethora of mods without doing the research into what else may be affected. If I was in the USA I would be scared to do some of the posted mods for fear of being litigated out of existence.

Simon

Frank Lee 09-21-2016 09:36 AM

Uhmericans are scared enough to take many chances In The Land Of The Free.

For example I know there's a lot of fear involved with making a motorized bicycle. Is it too fast, is it this, is it that. When I was young I heard story after story about guys who hung engines on their bikes. Back before lawyers ran the country. Back when there wasn't 1000 people/square mile and everyone wasn't stepping on everyone else's toes.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r...psbblrgd2a.jpg

seifrob 09-21-2016 11:26 AM

We have quite simple situation in the E.U. Does your mod have E.U.approval declaration? No? So its illegal, you fail bi-annual inspection. Does it have declaration but its used beyond its scope? ( putting VW OEM lights on Renault car for example.), its illegal, you fail annual inspection. So every mod I did has to be removable on roadside, lightweight and harmless. Pulled over one time, removed my rear skirts as asked. But even here there must be loopholes, because sometimes I see modded cars a' la Wingo pixar character.

... Or maybe they remove all mods before inspection.

Gasoline Fumes 09-21-2016 11:26 AM

Always mod responsibly! My 35% VLT window tint isn't legal in New York State, but I've never been hassled about it. Removing my outside mirror isn't legal here either, but my interior side view mirror gives me a better view. I got pulled over once for the missing mirror. I have also removed the passenger's side wiper arm and put a longer wiper blade on the driver's side. I put the mirror and wiper back on once a year for the annual inspection. I don't think any of my illegal mods endanger anybody. Safety is important when modding cars. Which is why I still have the interior pieces around the front seats still in place. I don't want sharp metal around me! My 25 year old pile of rust isn't safe compared to a modern car, but I haven't done anything to it that makes it less safe to me or anybody else. Except let it rust!

gone-ot 09-21-2016 02:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gasoline Fumes (Post 523230)
Always mod responsibly!

The "new" ecomodder 'by-line" (for political correctness)?

Stubby79 09-21-2016 03:34 PM

There are laws up here, last I heard, that tell you that all metal in the vehicle's passenger cabin must be covered. The guys who add roll cages to their cars end up putting pipe insulation foam around the tubes for this purpose. Anyway, just another reason for me not to strip my interior.
I wonder if just covering it all in duct tape would be enough?

Frank Lee 09-21-2016 05:07 PM

My old cars/trucks are half metal inside, stock.

ChopStix 09-21-2016 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Frank Lee (Post 523221)
Uhmericans are scared enough to take many chances In The Land Of The Free.

For example I know there's a lot of fear involved with making a motorized bicycle. Is it too fast, is it this, is it that. When I was young I heard story after story about guys who hung engines on their bikes. Back before lawyers ran the country. Back when there wasn't 1000 people/square mile and everyone wasn't stepping on everyone else's toes.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r...psbblrgd2a.jpg

Not to hyjack, but I know a guy who got a speeding ticket for doing 32 mph in a 30 zone from the electric motor he added on to his pedal bike. Not a joke.

PS luv the pic! Saved a copy for myself!


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:39 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com