Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > General Efficiency Discussion
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-04-2012, 02:53 PM   #1 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,927
Thanks: 877
Thanked 2,020 Times in 1,303 Posts
Interesting study on heat loss

Green Car Congress: Toyota: targeted cooling of upper cylinder liner effective way to improve anti-knock quality and thermal efficiency

regards
Mech

  Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to user removed For This Useful Post:
Frank Lee (05-04-2012), Ryland (05-04-2012), shovel (05-04-2012), t vago (05-04-2012)
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 05-04-2012, 04:21 PM   #2 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Phoenix
Posts: 595
Thanks: 106
Thanked 113 Times in 71 Posts
So in a practical future engine design, this could be as simple as a second cooling circuit and a higher compression ratio?
__________________
2005 Escape 2.3 MT 2WD
2002 Mustang 3.8 AT
2015 Ram 1500 5.7L 4WD
2002 Motobecane 700DS
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2012, 07:06 PM   #3 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Boise Idaho
Posts: 842
Thanks: 39
Thanked 89 Times in 69 Posts
Pretty interseting. Maybe they should create cylinder liners which are ultra thing - like a silicon nickel composite plama arced onto aluminum liners.

They could call the resulting technology SiliNic.......

(GRins!)

2 stroke guys figured this all out 30 years ago and use chrome type plating called nicasil. Theory is the plating is on a aluminum, which is a great conductor of heat.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-04-2012, 07:58 PM   #4 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 5,927
Thanks: 877
Thanked 2,020 Times in 1,303 Posts
I think Oldsmobile used the NickaSil on their 215 cube turbocharged V8 in 1963. Later GM licensed the technology to Mercedes, Porsche, and other manufacturers including Rover.

It was 215 pounds, neat engine, 1 HP per pound.

Forget boring that block over standard.

regards
Mech

Last edited by user removed; 05-04-2012 at 08:04 PM..
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2012, 12:14 AM   #5 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Victoria , Australia.
Posts: 499
Thanks: 20
Thanked 46 Times in 33 Posts
Nicasil was developed by Mahle in Germany at the request of Mercedes Benz for the experimental Wankel engine MB were using as a prototype at the time.
When the company decided rotary engines were not the way to go they allowed other companies to access the patent.

Subsequently it was used by Porsche on their air cooled competition engines including the 917 Turbo installation to help with the 1000+ horsepower output.

When the patent expired a large number of companies bought the technology to use in virtually all two stroke engines from chainsaws to world champion motorcycles.

So far as I know GM never used it.

Peter.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2012, 12:19 AM   #6 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
mwebb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 513

no nickname , it's just a car - '04 volkswagen golf tdi
Thanks: 2
Thanked 101 Times in 74 Posts
BMW tried nikasil ... bad idea

BMW tried nikasil ... bad idea
BMW M60 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2012, 02:16 PM   #7 (permalink)
...beats walking...
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: .
Posts: 6,190
Thanks: 179
Thanked 1,522 Times in 1,123 Posts
...with the recent switch to ultra-low suphur gasoline (and diesel) fuels, GM and others are giving Nikasil another "try."
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2012, 08:31 PM   #8 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Boise Idaho
Posts: 842
Thanks: 39
Thanked 89 Times in 69 Posts
there are other solutions similar to nikasil which don't have issues with sulphur gas - I don't know the exact name. This technology is a mature one for the 2 stroke crowd.

I didn't realize Mahle had invented it that long ago. I do know 911 porsche's have had it for a long time.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-05-2012, 09:43 PM   #9 (permalink)
(:
 
Frank Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: up north
Posts: 12,761

Blue - '93 Ford Tempo
Last 3: 27.29 mpg (US)

F150 - '94 Ford F150 XLT 4x4
90 day: 18.5 mpg (US)

Sport Coupe - '92 Ford Tempo GL
Last 3: 69.62 mpg (US)

ShWing! - '82 honda gold wing Interstate
90 day: 33.65 mpg (US)

Moon Unit - '98 Mercury Sable LX Wagon
90 day: 21.24 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,585
Thanked 3,548 Times in 2,215 Posts
Even Briggs & Stratton has had nikasil on their cheapo-line of engines for 54 years. I hate the stuff; you can bore out/hone good ol' cast iron. Premium small engines have cast iron liners, among other things.
__________________



Last edited by Frank Lee; 05-05-2012 at 09:52 PM..
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2012, 07:44 AM   #10 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: London, UK
Posts: 113
Thanks: 16
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
This article (about Toyota's not exactly original 'discoveries') sets me thinking along the lines of my old soapbox gripe - the oft overlooked point about engineering to spread the load of waste heat around (in time) rather than always engineering blindly for the worst-case scenario instantaneous peaks of thermal load.

In a gas turbine engine for example, because of the continuous flow of heat across the combustion zone, waste heat exhausted after the turbine stage can be recuperated by passing the hot gases through a heat-exchanger that heats the air just after the final compression stage.

If there was a process by which the hottest region of the cylinder wall (nearest to the exhaust valves) could regenerate its excess heat around onto the surfaces nearest the inlet valves then (if it could happen fast enough [using heatpipe tech?]) there would be an opportunity for a kind of micro-recuperation in a SI engine. The whole system would need to be designed from the ground up for this to be possible and the intake tract would need to be thermally separated from the head otherwise the thermal efficiency would be lowered by too warm air (esp. on DI gas engines).

  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com