Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > Fossil Fuel Free
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-05-2013, 12:52 PM   #1 (permalink)
Master EcoModder
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 400
Thanks: 33
Thanked 138 Times in 102 Posts
Large format NiMH batteries

Most of us know the story of how Chevron supposedly crushed the use of large format Nimh batteries a few years back which for a while took the sails out of the electric car industry. Along came one version or another of lithium batteries to save the day(but lithium is still highly expensive). We know that some of the hybrids use the small format Nimh cells for battery packs. So what has become of the large format packs?

From the best info I can find, the patents on Ovshinsky's large format Nimh batteries are about to expire. Quotes are from Wiki.

Quote:
In the early 1980s OBC produced Ovonic NiMH batteries for the consumer market.[5] Until that time, Nickel Cadmium (NiCad) batteries dominated the consumer rechargeable battery market, but NiMH batteries were safer, and stored more energy in an equivalent size. It also began work with Hyundai Motor Company and an unnamed Japanese automaker on batteries for electric vehicles (EVs).[8] In 1992, OCB was awarded a contract by the United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), a consortium of US automakers, to develop EV batteries, and in 1993, their first EV NiMH battery pack was used in the Chrysler TE van,[5] which previously used Li-alloy/FeS batteries.[9]
The previous quote makes me think that the patent had probably been issued already by 1993.

Quote:
According to SEC filings, ECD Ovonics and Cobasys hold 125 US patents related to NiMH battery technology. 13 of the patents, considered particularly important, are due to expire by 2014.
Normally a patent is good for 20 years from first application or 17 years from being accepted. Again my guess is that the patent on the large format Nimh batteries is about to expire.

So has anyone heard of any company considering introducing a large format Nimh pack? I know they don't have the energy density as some of the lithium packs, but they are a proven format(used in the Toyota Rav4 E) and IIRC a lot less expensive to purchase than lithium.

Anyone, anyone....Beuhller.

JJ

  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 04-05-2013, 01:08 PM   #2 (permalink)
home of the odd vehicles
 
rmay635703's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Somewhere in WI
Posts: 3,469

Silver - '10 Chevy Cobalt XFE
Thanks: 388
Thanked 734 Times in 549 Posts
The only one who actually knew how to make usuable NIMH in a large format was pansonic, so unless they feel like it again, I doubt you will see any.

Als they are quite expensive now because of the cost of nickle
  Reply With Quote
Old 04-05-2013, 01:56 PM   #3 (permalink)
Administrator
 
Daox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Germantown, WI
Posts: 11,166

CM400E - '81 Honda CM400E
90 day: 51.49 mpg (US)

Daox's Grey Prius - '04 Toyota Prius
Team Toyota
90 day: 49.53 mpg (US)

Daox's Insight - '00 Honda Insight
90 day: 64.33 mpg (US)

Swarthy - '14 Mitsubishi Mirage DE
Mitsubishi
90 day: 56.69 mpg (US)
Thanks: 2,464
Thanked 2,536 Times in 1,529 Posts
I cant imagine many OEMs using nimh. It is a proven technology and it is a pretty good one too. But, everyone has pretty much gone to lithium now. EVs especially need to increase energy density, not go backwards. Hybrids have gone to lithium because prices are falling and they can get away with lighter and smaller packs. Perhaps we'll see more 'budget' hybrids using nimh? I believe the Prius and its variants use nimh simply to keep costs down. However, everyone else I can think of is using lithium.

__________________
Current project: A better alternator delete
  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools




Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com