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Old 02-03-2008, 05:52 PM   #51 (permalink)
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For a road bike, if you are going to ride it any distance make sure that you get the "Look" style pedals (the ones that are larger, oval-ish, shaped). They have a larger contact area so the stress of pedaling is distributed better then on SPD pedals. Also, for your shoes, make sure you get ones with 3 straps. 2 strap shoes work ok, but I have found that 3 strap ones hold my foot in much better on uphill climbs, when I'm pulling up on my pedals hard. Other then that it's basically up to preference. As of a year ago, the best pedals were made of carbon filled and the ones I got were filled with a type of plastic to reduce weight and while not as light or strong as the carbon filled ones, they got the job done just fine and were around $100(USD) IIRC, the carbon filled were closer to $200(USD) I think. A recommendation for shoes also, I don't know what you're looking for exactly, but I got my shoes from a company called "Sidi". I got their model called "Genius". They are leather on top and have a carbon fiber sole, they hardly weigh anything, but they weren't cheap. IIRC they were around $250(USD) which may sound like a lot but they are great shoes and the cheapest shoes you will likely find are going to run you around $100-$150(USD).

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Old 02-07-2008, 12:56 AM   #52 (permalink)
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This has been proving a bit harder to do then I expected.
First do all shoes work with all systems? I assume not but some people seem to talk like they do.

Second what are the merits of different systems? Advantages and disadvantages?
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Old 02-07-2008, 01:17 AM   #53 (permalink)
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So here's the shoe/pedal rundown.

3 bolt cleats -
Look, Shimano road, some others that I'm forgetting.

These are big honkin' plastic cleats that are a good 1/4 thick. They're triangular, about 2" wide at the base and 3" per side. They fit shoes that have 3 bolt spaces/slots in the soles.

Advantages: fewer "hotspots" on your foot from pressure after many miles in the saddle. Good for roadies, hence they're usually only found on road bikes/road shoes.

Disadvantages: plastic wears out rather quickly if you walk around. You don't want to "walk" around because it's more like "crippled-hobbling" around, can be harder to clip in/out of.

2 bolt cleats -
Eggbeaters, SPD, some others that I'm forgetting.

These are small metal cleats (either steel or brass) that are about 1" square and about 1/8" thick. They fit shoes with 2 bolt holes/slots.

Advantages: smaller cleat = easier walking (you can actually walk in them). They last longer than plastic cleats. Generally easier to clip in/out.

Disadvantages: can lead to "hotspots" (areas of increased pressure on the sole of your foot) after hours in the saddle.


Most all cycling shoes will specify weather they are 2 or 3 bolt compatible, or both.
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Old 02-07-2008, 09:04 AM   #54 (permalink)
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What AndrewJ said is exactly it.

Another thing too, most shoes that fit the SPD pedals will look more like normal shoes because the people who use SPD pedals the most are mountain bikers who often have to get off their bike and carry their bike up stairs or if they fall they need to walk in mud so they are easy to get in and out of and easier to walk in but they are not designed for prolonged riding like a road cyclist might do.

The LOOK style pedals will generally fit on shoes that look like those low cut "track style" shoes that you see people like lance armstrong or any other professional endurance cyclist wearing. They are designed to be as stiff as possible to provide maximum comfort and the best power transfer from your foot to the pedal as possible while being as light as possible.

It is really up to personal preference which you like the best. I know road cyclist who swear by the SPD pedals and say they are perfectly comfortable with them for 100+ mile rides. You really just need to find a bike shop that will allow you to get on a test bike with each and see which you like more. But in general, picking out the shoe is the easy part because the clip that goes on the bottom of the shoe comes with the pedals and then they bolt onto the bottom of whatever shoe you got (except in rare cases where the shoe doesn't have the right bolt pattern but I know that the road style, low cut shoe usually fits both SPD and LOOK style cleats).
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Old 02-07-2008, 09:48 AM   #55 (permalink)
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http://www.crankbrothers.com/quattro.php

Disadvantage: A bit slower to engage than typical road pedals

I do rando riding (200 - 1200kms) and these are incredible pedals and can be had for under $100 if you shop around. These are essentially eggbeaters with a platform.
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Old 02-08-2008, 04:26 PM   #56 (permalink)
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It's here!

SVOBoy helped me fix up my front derailleur so the chain doesn't rub
The handle bar is slightly bent on the left side but it is minor and seems only cosmetic. I may get to replacing that. Now for pedals and shoes next weekend!

Shimano R-500 wheelset, FSA Vero Cranks 50/34, Shimano 105 shifters and brake levers, Ulltegra rear 10 speed derailleur, tektro R350 brakes, Masi Elite Carbon Fork w/ integrated alloy steerer, Carbon seat post, Ritchey Alloy Handlebar and Masi adjustable height stem.




















Last edited by Gone4; 02-08-2008 at 04:50 PM..
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Old 02-08-2008, 04:38 PM   #57 (permalink)
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Putsaround - '96 Toyota Camry LE
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Great looking bike! Make sure that you fit yourself properly. I'll try to find the link that shows how to do it, but there's a bit of measurement involved, but it's very easy to do and makes a huge difference in comfort and your power transfer to the pedals.

Why are you trying to remove the shifter guard?
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Old 02-08-2008, 04:46 PM   #58 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoCO2 View Post
Great looking bike! Make sure that you fit yourself properly. I'll try to find the link that shows how to do it, but there's a bit of measurement involved, but it's very easy to do and makes a huge difference in comfort and your power transfer to the pedals.

Why are you trying to remove the shifter guard?
Took me forever to edit my post above. I was giddy and quick to post with too few details and extra pictures of the same thing

Anyways, in the highest gears the chain was starting to scrape the FD. I was testing the bike upside down making sure everything worked.

Once I sell off my half of the car, this will be the most expensive thing I own since my computers are devalued to nothing.
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Old 02-08-2008, 06:39 PM   #59 (permalink)
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Putsaround - '96 Toyota Camry LE
90 day: 32.74 mpg (US)

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O, you don't remove it, you can actually adjust the that so that it doesn't rub. There are two tiny screw somewhere on there that stick out a bit. You turn those one way or another to make the front and back of that thing move in and out a bit for small adjustments, it probably just needs to be adjusted. But it's not a guard, that's the actual derailer, without that you can't shift...

It could also be that you're in the wrong gear ratio for that gear. I can't remember what it usually is. But there are certain rear gears for certain front gears and if you put it in the biggest front gear and in the wrong combination of the two it will make the chain angle funny so it rubs a lot.
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Old 02-09-2008, 12:39 AM   #60 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoCO2 View Post
It could also be that you're in the wrong gear ratio for that gear. I can't remember what it usually is. But there are certain rear gears for certain front gears and if you put it in the biggest front gear and in the wrong combination of the two it will make the chain angle funny so it rubs a lot.
I need to find out a way of knowing this. I am gone for the weekend, but I don't want to spend hours trying to fix something that cannot be fixed! I will search tomorrow. Thanks for the hint.

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