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Old 05-08-2015, 08:00 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Snow chains

Getting ready for more global warming this winter..



We had a couple of occasions this past winter, when we needed to go out,
but our street was too loaded with snow.. So, we stayed home.

So, We now have snow chains for both of our cars (FWD cars).
Now, if we really need to make tracks, we'll be able to..
~~~

My problem is upper body strength is getting weaker as I near 70..
Hooking those links up to that round rubber band is a young man's job..
I had to use a looped rope (like a pulley) to get the tension needed.
So, I just ordered some ten inch bungees..

Anyone here have any experience using this type of chain?
Amazon.com: Security Chain Company WS1705 Whitestar Alloy Tire Traction Chain - Set of 2: Automotive
Maybe give me some pointers?
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Old 05-09-2015, 01:19 AM   #2 (permalink)
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I have not used that style of chain, but have used the self-tensioning type pictured here:



BuyAutoTrac.com | Buy Auto-Trac™ Self-Tightening Tire Chain | Snow Chain, Easy Installation & Removal - buyautotrac.com

The chains go over the top of the tires, and it isn't necessary to roll forward on them to install. Cables pull out to connect the chain halves, and they automatically tension as you drive.
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Old 05-09-2015, 10:03 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Those look nice, and I almost ordered some, but those little spring loaded tighteners scared me a little.
I read a couple of reviews where they failed. Plus, I couldn't find any cheap ones on ebay..
If I had found any for $40, I would have gotten them.

My Bungee order will be here Monday, and I'm going to do another practice chain install.
If these Bungees make it easier and quicker, I'm going to be a happy camper.
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Old 05-09-2015, 05:41 PM   #4 (permalink)
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I use the old fashioned style tire chains with a hook on the back side, and a clip thingy on the front. I shortened the free ends to the correct length when I got them so that I only need to connect to the end link, and the chain is automatically correctly adjusted. When I changed to a slightly larger tire, I had to weld on a couple of links.

Lay the chain out, lift over the tire, hook the hook on the back side, then wiggle the whole chain toward me to get the slack out of the back side, and clip the clip. Done. I only need to do this once or twice a year. My brother gets a lot more practice and claims he can chain up all four tires in five minutes.
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Old 05-10-2015, 01:34 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Just curious, since I grew up in the northeast, and learned to drive there, but how in the world did you manage to go this long without chains?
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Old 05-10-2015, 02:25 PM   #6 (permalink)
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My last rear wheel drive car was traded in for a 4WD in 1978.
That old 1973 Lemans did pretty well with four steel-studded snows..
It got me home on the 1st day of the "Blizzard of '78".

Northeastern United States blizzard of 1978 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

It was that event that made me want to buy a Subaru wagon..
(It was the wagon version of the Brat pickup).
Since then, we've driven only FWD or 4WD/AWD cars.
We rarely ever get stuck anywhere..

My 'last' car was the Ford Escape with FWD, because I was done with working..
Being retired, means no more driving to work during snow storms..?.

BUT, Now that winters seem to be getting worse, I'm starting to prepare for the worse.
If I'm ever forced into driving in bad conditions, I want to have those chains.
I've read reviews that implied two chains on a FWD can work better than a 4WD with regular tires..

We have chains for the Prius too. They will stay in the trunk all winter.. Just in case they are ever needed.
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:22 PM   #7 (permalink)
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I used to work in the auto parts business and sold Campbell chains for the highway departments. I saw some steel cable through wedges as tire devices for FWD cars. Even in Buffalo NY chains on passenger cars are rare. We save our money to buy snow blowers for the tractors. Good tires and 9 inches of ground clearance are good most of the time. Snowmobiles get used otherwise.
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Old 05-11-2015, 10:32 AM   #8 (permalink)
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I use snow tires on both of my vehicles.

If there is so much snow that the lifted Jeep on snow tires can't go, snow chains will not help
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Old 05-11-2015, 01:07 PM   #9 (permalink)
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'Dry' snow

I think the lift depends on the water content (and temperature) of the snow.
We had a lot of 'Dry' snow this past winter. Six or eight inches of snow that
could be quickly cleared away with a snow shovel. Pretty amazing.
If it was under 6", I didn't even use my back-brace!

One problem was trying to walk around in the deep dry snow..
Snow shoes would just sink 3 or 4 feet to the ground..
When I fell backwards, I made a hole in the snow. Hard to escape from!
Sitting on the ground, on the back ends of the snow shoes, snow well over my head..
And nothing to grab onto, to pull myself up..

I think driving over 8 or 10 inches of super dry snow wouldn't be a real problem.
The chains would help with those wide tires (toboggan effect tires)..
I wouldn't try anything over 6" with the Prius, unless it was blow-away light stuff.

When I used to drive the old Laser RS, it's wide tires were pretty useless in snow.
A set of smaller rims and 4 GoodYear F42 snowtires solved that problem..
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Old 05-11-2015, 05:37 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Snow can get packed under the chassis so that it supports the weight of the vehicle and then there is not enough down force for traction.

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