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Old 11-14-2012, 12:55 PM   #31 (permalink)
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I just got a fire blanket for my civic. Overtop of the exhaust, from the rad to the firewall. Doesn't touch the exhaust or go near any moving parts.

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Old 11-14-2012, 10:41 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daox View Post
Unfortunately, radiator size has nothing to do with warm up time. You must reduce the volume of coolant within the engine block to warm up faster.
This is only half true.

The thermostat doesn't stay closed. When the temperature of the coolant near the thermostat reaches the limit of the thermostat, it opens until coolant which is not at the limit temp touches it and cools down the wax inside. This happens usually at least once before the temperature gauge even moves.

It will happen a handful of times before the engine is "warmed up", and even more before you get to the point where the engine is /thoroughly/ warmed or temperature stable.

Every time the thermostat opens, it lets the hot coolant into the radiator. A larger radiator will allow the coolant to spread over more area, thus cooling it faster. So yes, indirectly, a larger radiator will affect warm-up times.
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Old 11-15-2012, 04:31 PM   #33 (permalink)
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if its not too hard, maybe place a cardboard sheet directly over (half, or less) of the radiator to help reduce the cooling surface? Monitor temps accordingly, of course. If this is not satisfactory, switch to the engine insulation idea. or use a mixture of both.

Radiator block would help the circulating fluid heat up faster(less open faced cooling surface).
Engine "blanket" would help retain the heat for X amount of time once shut down...

Small radiator(less surface area)=less cooling efficiency, Bigger(larger suface area)=more colling efficiency.

*Its always easier to Heat something, But not as easy as keeping your engine in safe operating temps if you are unable to correct possible issue(s) immediately to prevent damage. Wind chill factors may play a part in what you can get away with safely for warmup. And what YOU are comfortable with.


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Old 11-16-2012, 02:04 AM   #34 (permalink)
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Just got an idea: What about two half-sized radiators, plumbed in parallel? One would have a valve allowing it to be closed off for winter and opened for summer. Or it could be opened automatically only when the coolant gets too hot, sort of like a second loop with a hotter thermostat. It takes up the same amount of room and shouldn't add too much weight.
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Piwoslaw's Peugeot 307sw modding thread

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Old 11-16-2012, 09:00 AM   #35 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piwoslaw View Post
Just got an idea: What about two half-sized radiators, plumbed in parallel? One would have a valve allowing it to be closed off for winter and opened for summer. Or it could be opened automatically only when the coolant gets too hot, sort of like a second loop with a hotter thermostat. It takes up the same amount of room and shouldn't add too much weight.
I'm actually pretty surprised OEM's don't do this on light trucks. The cooling system on my F250 is hugely oversized when I'm not towing, even for the 100* summers.

I guess that warmup times aren't factored into fuel economy ratings (also, a lot of light truck are exempt from having to obtain ratings), so there really is no "value" added as far as the factory is concerned -- just an additional component to fail with huge associated risks.

Eh, also a block heater could be used to accomplish similar goals (although not as convenient as a self-contained system like the radiators) with much less risk and significantly less investment.

Anyway -- I do really like the parallel radiator concept. How about a secondary thermostat to allow flow to the auxiliary radiator?

Last edited by bryson; 11-16-2012 at 09:07 AM.. Reason: speeling errorrs =)
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:05 AM   #36 (permalink)
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Both of those will help once the thermostat is open. Until then, not so much. Faster warmup would really help me, since most of my trips are under 10 miles and my car takes about 10 miles to reach full temperature in winter. (with complete grille block)
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Old 11-19-2012, 09:10 AM   #37 (permalink)
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+1 on the block heater. Everything else compared seems like a HUGE effort for a similar gain. though, radiators are fairly cheap and simple to acquire and plumb, from parts lots.
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Old 11-19-2012, 01:31 PM   #38 (permalink)
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I guess the block heater maybe the best option since you have played with lifepo4 batteries, maybe you have a few to make a pack to run an inverter to power the block heater?

Not sure how much the heater benefits since its my understanding or misunderstanding the prius pumps its coolant into a giant thermos under the fender at shut down to repump to aid in warm up at next use.

Think Ive seen online where some guys installed a heater in the thermos?

If you plug in kit has the wiring according to Enginer I know it wont work til the Ready light appears and anything spent to ready the system faster should pay you back quickly allowing use of the phev kit too on such short trips.
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Old 11-19-2012, 06:30 PM   #39 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiderofBikes View Post

Small radiator(less surface area)=less cooling efficiency, Bigger(larger suface area)=more colling efficiency.




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I'm thinking you meant something else here, because this statement is patently incorrect.

The larger surface area of the radiator distributes heat further, causing each unit area of the cooling or active surface of the radiator to be closer to the temperature of the air flowing through it.

Greatest efficiency is achieved at a higher differential, ergo a smaller radiator distributing the same BTU would be "more efficient".
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Old 11-19-2012, 08:09 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Christ View Post
I'm thinking you meant something else here, because this statement is patently incorrect.

The larger surface area of the radiator distributes heat further, causing each unit area of the cooling or active surface of the radiator to be closer to the temperature of the air flowing through it.

Greatest efficiency is achieved at a higher differential, ergo a smaller radiator distributing the same BTU would be "more efficient".
No it was correct originally there is a reason a radiator to a v8 is bigger than a radiator to a I4. They need more of a cooling factor which means more cooling fluid whether you use water or coolant. So if you put a smaller radiator on the motor than what there should be it will heat up quicker but may overheat. This can be effective on motors where the vehicle comes with both I4 and v6's and bigger as they tend not to put in a smaller radiator for a smaller motor it is easier just to keep the same parts in them.

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