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Old 11-19-2012, 08:42 PM   #41 (permalink)
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Here is how you should consider radiator size or capacity. Imagine if you could precisely control the temperature of the coolant coming out of the radiator. This would allow you to keep the thermostat wide open, preventing the water pump from working against the restriction of a closed thermostat. It would also keep the cooled coolant at the best temperature for another circuit through the hot engine. Just enough heat removal to allow sufficient cooling to prevent overheating, regardless of the load or whether that load is sustained or temporary.

Radiators, being designed for the absolute worst case scenario, have way too much capacity for any typical hypermiler. In fact, in severly cold extremes, many hypermilers could probably keep the engine cool with only the heater core!

Most cooling systems have a bypass circuit, so the engine can circulate coolant even while it is warming up, just not through the radiator. I do like the idea of a radiator with sections that can be eliminated to keep outlet temperatures higher.

Think of it, when radiator coolant exit temperatures in wintertime when the coolant flow is restricted by the partially open thermostat. The coolant exiting the radiator in those instances can be as much as 100+ degrees colder than coolant on a hot summer day.

We used to do a quick checlk on radiators by holding on to the top hose (hot) and the bottom hose (cooler). The difference in temperature would become less and less as the radiator slowly became clogged over time. By the time the car started overheating the temperatures were almost the same since the radiator was not "radiating" any heat.

What I found after replacing the radiator with a new one was some customers who actually keep records of their mileage would inform me of a loss of MPG, particularly in the winter, when they had the new radiator which removed more heat and returned much colder coolant to the engine.

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Old 11-19-2012, 08:55 PM   #42 (permalink)
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Guys beat me too it!
lol
Just got home from work and refuel... 45.75mpg E10 tank

Ok back to topic
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:11 PM   #43 (permalink)
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Daox, I wonder how you're doing on this. Lots of barely-on-topic material in this thread.

I'm working on a tank type heater on my Civic, not done yet.

HOWEVER, I calculated that running the heater on 12V DC will draw not-too-many amps from my deep cycle battery when parked. I think it came to about .8A for my 850 watt heater. Not enough to heat a cold block, BUT if you connect it after arriving at work it might be enough to keep the block warm till quitting time, without draining too much charge from the battery.

I won't even think about an inverter running off deep cycles to power the heater to heat a cold block. Probably would need a bank of big batteries. I could do the calf but don't know the efficiency losses of typical inverters of the needed wattage rating.
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:11 PM   #44 (permalink)
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IN the weather that seldom gets above freezing I block my whole front end and use the heater control watching my sg2 to regulate temp. Of course the radiator fans still work and when they are triggered they do provide more cooling.

Most t stats have a leak to allow some coolant to flow for some reason, so maybe a radiator delete?
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:25 PM   #45 (permalink)
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I haven't done anything with this. I believe this thread was originally started when I was daily driving my Paseo.
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Old 11-20-2012, 02:28 PM   #46 (permalink)
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Quote:
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I haven't done anything with this. I believe this thread was originally started when I was daily driving my Paseo.
And your current DD is the Prius I guess?
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Old 11-20-2012, 02:37 PM   #47 (permalink)
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Yep. Between the coolant thermos and a block heater the warm up is pretty quick. It could still use work, but I haven't had time to do anything.
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Old 11-20-2012, 04:50 PM   #48 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gealii View Post
No it was correct originally there is a reason a radiator to a v8 is bigger than a radiator to a I4. They need more of a cooling factor which means more cooling fluid whether you use water or coolant. So if you put a smaller radiator on the motor than what there should be it will heat up quicker but may overheat. This can be effective on motors where the vehicle comes with both I4 and v6's and bigger as they tend not to put in a smaller radiator for a smaller motor it is easier just to keep the same parts in them.
This has nothing to do with efficiency. You're talking about cooling capacity or capability.

In heat transfer, higher efficiencies are attained by a higher heat difference in the medium and transfer fluids.
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Old 11-21-2012, 12:53 PM   #49 (permalink)
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I wish I had more time to work on projects.

My idea to do create a similar system to the insulated coolant tank is to create a coolant to wax heat exchange. I have a transmission cooler 1x11x9 place that in a box that will be insulated and sealed melt the wax and dump it over the cooler in the box just leaving a little air space in the box and close it up tight.

Then add in two T's to the current return line or to the lowest point in the coolant path. At the first T I would install a low temp tstat so to open it to the coolant path. I might need to use a valve to open and close the path instead or use a small pump to force coolant in when it is cold and when it is up to temp. The last part will take some testing to get it to work the best.
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Old 11-23-2012, 02:00 AM   #50 (permalink)
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Why not a box with Pex tubing running through it and salt brine sealed in the box with an expansion/overflow chamber?

Salt holds heat pretty well... My limited experience with waxes... not so much.

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