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Old 12-11-2018, 01:11 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Low rolling resistance tires 2018

Do you concur?

https://tirereviewsandmore.com/top-1...ficient-tires/

I am going to copy and past this article for all its worth incase the link goes dead in the future like an article on a failed man made climate change narrative.

And here it is......

With fuel prices constantly rising and falling, many drivers are looking to get the highest fuel mileage they can out of their vehicles. One of the biggest ways to increase fuel efficiency is with a set of new tires.

Today, tire makers are using the latest in technology to create tires that lower rolling resistance and add 2-8% in higher fuel mileage, which definitely adds up over time. That said, here’s our 2018 Top 10 Most Fuel Efficient Tires. All tires are not listed in any particular order. They are all designed with performance and fuel efficiency in mind.

Picture a tire here: 0

The Michelin Energy Saver A/S is Michelin’s most fuel efficient tire in Michelin's lineup. It’s unique tread compound and EnergySaver construction claim to add up to 8% more fuel efficiency to your hybrid or fuel efficient vehicle. Beyond that, this model provides excellent dry and wet performance to go with a very comfortable ride quality. There’s also a 65,000 mile tread warranty included.

Picture another tire here: 0

The new Continental PureContact with ecoplus technology is specially designed with Tg-F Polymers and +Silane additives in the tread compound that provide a lower rolling resistance and enhance fuel efficiency. It also provides increased dry, wet and snow traction. ComforRide technology adds a shock absorbent layer to give the tire extra comfort on all road surfaces. You’ll also find a 70,000 mile tread guarantee on this tire.

Another tire: 0

With an environmentally-friendly tread design, the Ecopia EP422 uses Bridgestone’s NanoPro Tech tread compound for lower rolling resistance and enhanced fuel economy. The symmetric tread pattern also sports a Fuel Saver compound in the sidewalls that further add to better fuel efficiency. Expect to find very capable all-season traction and a comfortable ride on this tire.

A tire: 0

Goodyear’s Assurance Fuel Max is designed with a low rolling resistance tread compound for greater fuel efficiency and all-season driving performance. This model features unique Dry and Wet Zones that function together to provide the best traction and handling possible. Add in the comfortable ride this tire provides and a 65,000 mile tread warranty and it’s easy to see why this tire is a popular choice among drivers of all types of coupes, sedans, vans and crossovers.

And that's it.
Looks like the good year if your best bet for trucks and SUVs.
What do you think?

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Old 12-11-2018, 09:30 AM   #2 (permalink)
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i'd probably add too that sometimes walmart tires are so much cheaper that the extra 5% in FE gained from lrr tires that cost almost double would never be made up. I ended up saying F the Bridgestone/Michelin LRRs and just went for walmart tires this time around on the smoke bomb. Tires were 52$ ea vs ~90$ ea for LRR tires.
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Old 12-11-2018, 10:03 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Those seem like all the more pricey LRR tires. I am interested in trying out the Hankook Kinergy ST H735 tires on my Mirage. They're priced around $60. They have a 70k miles treadwear warranty.
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Old 12-11-2018, 12:58 PM   #4 (permalink)
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I have already had the range of my leaf impacted by "average" LRR tires.
In the nissan leaf it's not about saving money on overall cost like a with a gasoline powered vehicle.
It's all about the range.
I can't fill up just anywhere like a gasoline vehicle is able to.
The leaf saves $150 to $250 per month in gas so I can afford to put the pricy tires on it.
On a purely tire cost verses electricity saved added cost of the high end LRR tires they will never ever come any where close to paying for them selves.
The savings is in being able to take the leaf instead of the gasoline car, not running the battery down to the point of damaging it, not ending up on the side of the road in need of a tow is where the real saving are.
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:14 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daox View Post
Those seem like all the more pricey LRR tires. I am interested in trying out the Hankook Kinergy ST H735 tires on my Mirage. They're priced around $60. They have a 70k miles treadwear warranty.
Hankook Kinergy came on my new Honda CRV 2018 with CVT. I try everything, including pulse and engine-on glide, and can only get the EPA stated mileage in city or highway driving. They are pumped to 44 psi, which is a little less than sidewall. The lie-o-meter runs about 1.7 mpg higher than the pump calculation. Too new to estimate wear (only 12000 miles on them).
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Old 12-12-2018, 12:01 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hayden55 View Post
i'd probably add too that sometimes walmart tires are so much cheaper that the extra 5% in FE gained from lrr tires that cost almost double would never be made up. I ended up saying F the Bridgestone/Michelin LRRs and just went for walmart tires this time around on the smoke bomb. Tires were 52$ ea vs ~90$ ea for LRR tires.
I agree that the price of the tires matters. But remember that the cost of mounting them also matters. My Michelin's had a very high rating for durability, and I have noticed the cheapo tires generall have very low ratings. If you have the mount tires twice as often, you pay that fee per tire twice as often and the ROI calculation for the pricier, LRR tires changes significantly.
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Old 12-12-2018, 05:29 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by California98Civic View Post
I agree that the price of the tires matters. But remember that the cost of mounting them also matters. My Michelin's had a very high rating for durability, and I have noticed the cheapo tires generall have very low ratings. If you have the mount tires twice as often, you pay that fee per tire twice as often and the ROI calculation for the pricier, LRR tires changes significantly.
Also win for win walmart mounts their tires for free.
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Old 12-12-2018, 07:03 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I've come to love Discount tire direct. Most of the time I can get a whole new set of aluminum rims to go with the tires then get free mounting and balancing and still beat the local tire shops prices on just a new set of tires with mounting and balancing. Then I never seem to keep a car long enough that they ever need replaced again. We also got a good deal on a set of snow tires from Tire Buyer and they were shipped to a Firestone car center where they were mounted on some old steel rims we had and the mounting was prepaid when we bought the tires from them. A few rural letter carriers I know that use their own cars swear Walmart prices can't be beat (I think they will actually match if they are) and they can get in just about anything you want, you don't have to go with some off China brand if you are willing to wait, then no shipping and free mounting.
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Old 12-20-2018, 04:58 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Chinese el cheapo junk tires are usually also blessed with the worst FE
And handling
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Old 12-27-2018, 05:06 AM   #10 (permalink)
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https://m.tirerack.com/tires/tests/t...9b02460a1c0e0f

Here is a screen shot of the tire rack article.


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1984 chevy suburban, custom made 6.5L diesel turbocharged with a Garrett T76 and Holset HE351VE, 22:1 compression 13psi of intercooled boost.
1989 firebird mostly stock. Aside from the 6-speed manual trans, corvette gen 5 front brakes, 1LE drive shaft, 4th Gen disc brake fbody rear end.
2011 leaf SL, white, portable 240v CHAdeMO, trailer hitch, new batt as of 2014.

Last edited by oil pan 4; 12-27-2018 at 06:12 AM..
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