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Old 06-24-2018, 03:27 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Stubby79 View Post
Has the torque app been this far off before? If not, perhaps there was human error in the fueling process/math.
Torque has never been this far off for me. It's been no more than 5% off before, and it's uncalibrated since I have only the Lite version so far.

I also filled up at the same pump at the same station as I normally do.

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Originally Posted by oil pan 4 View Post
Cutting off the old plug and splicing it to a new sensor uses about $1 worth of solderless connectors.
I'll have to see about if I can do that or something similar if/when I replace it. Still ugh though lol.

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Originally Posted by Xist View Post
When I had an 02 error code "Heated" was part of the description. Doesn't the sensor heat itself as needed? I think that heating it is also part of the troubleshooting.
I'm not sure lol. All I know is that my MPG sucks right now and I hate it!

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Originally Posted by Xist View Post
I am sure that there are good brands. I just know that for Hondas with lean burn, everybody who has tried non-standard oxygen sensors has ended up purchasing NGK\NTK, although often from a different source. I only bought Honda parts to replace my timing belt (and the rest of the belts, the hoses and seals, etc.). I think that the original water pump and hoses have 195,000 miles on them.

There are some situations where the manufacturers cannot get their act together, like Subaru and their head gaskets. When I replaced mine I bought Fel-Pro, but if you can get a good price for Honda parts, I cannot imagine using aftermarket ones.
Just asked him for the exact price and he said it would be $215.

This bad sensor is decreasing my FE by about 19%. Replacing it will save me ~$0.01 per mile. I will need to drive 21,500 miles for it to pay off. I don't even drive that much (I've driven not quite 2000 miles in 5 months) so that's over 4 years until it breaks even. And the car still drives with the bad sensor. BUT I HATE GETTING THESE BAD MPGs so if I need to replace it I will...I guess..

Quote:
Originally Posted by California98Civic View Post
You definitely need to test the circuit for that O2. That is a circuit code. It is probably the sensor. It could be an open in the circuit, even an intermittent one. Don't spend your money on an O2 without testing. Testing is easy. Though you may end up in the same place, you will know you are in that place, rather than having guessed. If it is an open in the circuit, the fix could be quite a lot cheaper. To me this is good eco practice too: not trashing and replacing perfectly good parts.
Good point. looks up youtube video That looks complicated but I guess I'll give it a go when I can find the time to take it all apart. I've never worked on an engine before sooo.....

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Old 06-24-2018, 06:36 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Follow the procedure to check your O2 sensor.

If it is sluggish but operating, you can use most of the techniques used in the catalytic converter cleaning thread. The only difference is you don't have to worry too much about your molar strengths as you don't have to worry about stripping precious metal catalysts from your substrate. You just have to clean off the ceramic that forms the Nernst Cell circuit.

Start with a sodium hydroxide cleaner commonly found as " Purple Cleaner ". This will strip your caked on hydrocarbons and varnishes in short order. Dunking the sensor in gasoline may take a long while (over night) to get any effective cleaning and it may not dissolve carbon deposits effectively. Warm up the Purple Cleaner to just below boiling and set just the tip of the sensor in the liquid. Less than an hour is usually more then enough.

Then you do the same with a strong acid solution. Most any acid will work other than Sulfuric Acid. Sulfur can form a difficult to remove deposit. Muratic, Citric and Oxcalic acid, which I prefer, have proven effective. A warm solution is all that is needed. Dipping the sensor tip into the solution for an hour is enough to dissolve metallic build-ups and deposits.

Rinse and test the sensor using the propane torch and DMM procedure and you should see an improvement if the sensor is still in good operating condition.

I have successfully cleaned over two dozen sensors, both narrow and wide-b and.
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Old 06-25-2018, 10:16 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Ordered a new O2 sensor today. Fingers crossed.

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