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Old 07-25-2013, 07:02 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Here is a photo of the large duffle.
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Old 07-25-2013, 10:02 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Weight balance with saddlebags is quite harder to set properly, so I'd rather get a tailbag altough it increases more the center of gravity.
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Old 07-25-2013, 10:26 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cRiPpLe_rOoStEr View Post
increases more the center of gravity.
I have found with my system that adding my 40 pound bag right behind the rider's butt continues to let the bike ride perfectly since the mass is actually very close to the roll axis of the original cg when the rider is on the bike. The only time you feel that the load is higher than when empty is when walking the bike or when it is on the stand.
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Getting the weight too far back could eventually start to increase the yaw moment and make the bike wag but I have never felt any ill effects on the road from riding with my set up and since my load starts so far forward, the back of the bag is really not much farther back than the back of a taditionally mounted trunk would be.
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:10 PM   #14 (permalink)
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I too will vouch for the tailbag, mounted lengthwise.

It fills up the rider's wake, rather than stick out in the breeze and create an even bigger wake as saddlebags and a transverse mounted bag do.

A topcase doesn't cause as much drag as saddlebags and a transverse mounted bag.
When using a topcase, it's best to fill up the gap between rider and case with another bag.

I've never had much of an issue with the weight in the topcase being that much aft or that high up even though it was loaded well beyond the silly manufacturer's approved weight.

That included 200+ kph (indicated) on the Autobahn ;-)
And on a naked bike ...
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Old 07-25-2013, 11:37 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Photo of my large duffle bag.
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Old 07-29-2013, 01:26 AM   #16 (permalink)
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I can't say that I can see a difference in mileage with/without my panniers. KLR 650 (Kawasaki KLR 650) | Fuelly

The way the bike handles 75+mph speeds is vastly different but on paper it seems negligible. I prefer to not have them as that a wobble develops with headwinds/passing trucks/speeds over 80mph when the panniers are on, but then I'd have vastly reduced space for road-trip essentials.



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Old 03-12-2014, 01:36 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
I HATE tail bags, especially since I ride an adventure bike. Its hard to get your leg above and over the bag in a gas station
I finally figured out how to do it. Instead of throwing my leg over like you normally do, bend your knee as much as possible and throw your knee over the seat in front of the tail bag, then when it's past the bag you can straighten your leg again.

I have made my peace with tail bags, but small fabric ones tucked right behind my butt rather than those ridiculous givis hanging way the hell out back. Another option is to use a kayak bag which is tapered and should be good aerodynamically:
SealLine Kodiak Taper Dry Bag
Get the short one!

I also like very small saddlebags, positioned right behind my legs if possible. I have an old Chase-Harper bag that is only 4" thick so it does not stick out. I don't think they make it any more. Ortlieb has a nice 4" bag, but it ain't cheap like my Chase-Harper:
http://www.aerostich.com/ortlieb-thi...addlebags.html
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Old 03-13-2014, 05:31 PM   #18 (permalink)
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If I scale up a tail box I designed for my bicycle how wide is the typical seat on a motorcycle? I'm estimating 12 in. Some of the smaller panniers for bicycles are rounded and would fit close behind the legs.
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Old 03-14-2014, 01:08 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonathan6229 View Post
So, I got an ex-500 as a commuter, and for my wife to ride. So far, if not done too many mods, just adding a 1 tooth to the front sprocket, and tuning it. I have saddlebags on it now, but should I mount a tailbag on it instead? and idea how much FE that difference is going the difference on that? I'm starting to think that it might be enough to worry about. Anyone have any first or second experience to validate that?
As a guy that doesn't go anywhere without at least some luggage, I have to point out that weight is an issue. Where you hang the weight will effect the aero as well as the handling. I have ridden with sidecases, saddle bags, trunks, tail-packs, pass-packs, tank bags and even front saddle bags.

The best spot to put luggage is the tank bag location as it is closest to center of gravity both fore/aft, as well as left/right. Depending on the bike it doesn't raise the CG all that much. It fills a hollow behind headlight and instruments smoothing the airflow to the rider, reducing aero-drag.

Next up is a pass-pack, the kind that lays on the passenger seat and hugs your butt. Filling the space behind your butt sort of acting like a fairing to the bike. Unfortunately it really needs to be the style that the rider straps on like an overgrown fanny pack for it to really work. Also pass-packs don't hold much. They do hang the weight inside the axles on most bikes, so even if they are filled with lead pellets they don't effect the handling too much.

Next is the old west style, saddle bags. These don't really mount to the bike, instead they count on a rider's/passenger's butt holding the bags on the bike. They put the weight inside the axles and down low, so they don't effect handling and since they sit behind the legs of the rider, they are filling a dead space. Size is small, so that can be problem if your trying to carry a something larger (like a laptop).

If the items can pack pretty flat, there are some slim sidecases out there (Bag Connection has a couple). They would not stick out past your legs, again filling empty space. Sidecases hang the weight over the rear axle, can come in various sizes, If they are narrow they fill a dead space behind the riders legs and add little to no drag. Larger cases do stick out no doubt adding some drag.

What I wish I saw more front saddle bags or front soft cases. These hang or strap across the gas tank and hang down either side of it. below the controls they add weight inside the axles, with out obstructing controls.
They add width in front of the riders knees, so they don't fix and dead air space pockets, but they don't add much drag over the riders legs.

Trunks and true Tail-packs are about the worst bits of luggage, They put a box, up behind the rider, interrupting air flow that is trying to blend back to together. It also puts its weight up high and back behind the rear axle, negatively effecting the handling. Also most trunks and tail packs are still horizontal designs that stick out past the rider's sides, instead of being upright.
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Old 03-14-2014, 01:29 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by American Viking View Post
Trunks and true Tail-packs are about the worst bits of luggage, They put a box, up behind the rider, interrupting air flow that is trying to blend back to together. It also puts its weight up high and back behind the rear axle, negatively effecting the handling. Also most trunks and tail packs are still horizontal designs that stick out past the rider's sides, instead of being upright.
Depending on its size, I think it's a good place to carry a bag.

The low pressure, turbulent, void behind the rider isn't closing up smoothly or quickly at highway speeds, and a bag sitting close to the rider's rear is in that void.

Depending on size and shape it could fill that void in such a way to have some aerodynamic benefit.

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