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Old 04-12-2016, 09:27 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Thanks. Now we're talkin'!

Although it is kind of sad that it's not electric. They made a walking pace the length of the parking lot, tried to turn around and found the turning radius sucks, and then couldn't get it in reverse.

It's an interesting technique— slice veneers into thin strips to mimic hemp or basalt fibers, and then weave it into a cloth.

As we move beyond Japanese joinery; there is also plastic made from lignin.

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Old 04-12-2016, 10:42 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by deejaaa View Post
"With a driving range of 16 miles and a top speed of just 28mph, the battery powered Setsuna is not built to win at Le Mans. Instead, it champions a different cause altogether: a car-owner relationship thatís focused more on an intimate journey than on crossing finish lines."
I can see where it could last for generations. In the garage.
I wouldn't knock that notion. I never pursued heavy mods on the Mustang, because topless driving really is about slowing down and enjoying the moment. Similarly, I have always been a fan of the Piper Cub's low and slow approach to flying. You can open up the doors and have an airplane version of a convertible, really soaking in the details from an aerial perspective - lean it out right and it's good for 20ish mpg, if MS Flight simulator had its physics right It's really quite nice if you allow yourself what feels at first like a frivolous indulgence.

Although 28mph? Eh.
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Old 04-13-2016, 03:14 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Old Mechanic -- The Mosquito had a geodetic internal framing, the WWI Albatross had orthogonal framing. There was another Albatross that did use geodetic framing, the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Albatross DH91.

I can't source a picture of the Mosquito framing, but the Wellington used it in aluminum, like this:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_Wellington

Quote:
The Wellington used geodesic construction, devised by Barnes Wallis inspired by his work on airships, and previously used to build the single-engined Wellesley light bomber.
The diagonal framing is aluminum, the lengthwise stringers are wood. This was years before the geodesic dome was a twinkle in Bucky Fuller's eye.
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Old 04-13-2016, 11:50 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Barnes Wallis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barnes_Wallis

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Old 04-13-2016, 11:54 AM   #15 (permalink)
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The Albatros was the inspiration for the Mosquito, it's fuselage was a monocoupe, made from wood and glue.

Both planes were "game changers" in their respective wartime time periods, but the Albatros was a generation earlier.

I would bet even the Albatros was not the first.

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Old 04-13-2016, 11:57 AM   #16 (permalink)
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I think composites are ancient tech but here is the history of plywood.

Mud and straw may be the first composite, discovered by accident in a pile of debris?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plywood

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Old 04-13-2016, 01:55 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
The sizes of the most commonly used plywood sheets are 4 by 8 feet (1.2 by 2.4 m), which was first used by the Portland Manufacturing Company, who developed what we know of as modern veneer core plywood for the 1905 Portland World Fair... [9] A common metric size for a sheet of plywood is 1,220 ◊ 2,440 millimetres (4.00 ◊ 8.01 ft).
The more you know... plus a handy rule 305mm=1ft.
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Old 04-13-2016, 05:27 PM   #18 (permalink)
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I think they actually laminated the plywood in the compound curved shape of the fuselage on the Albatros. Probably on the compound curved sections of the Mosquito as well.

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Old 04-13-2016, 05:36 PM   #19 (permalink)
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All-plywood monocoque fuselage and wing fabrication. The fastest two-engine platform and passive radar stealth signature helped it be one of the best recce aircraft.
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Old 04-13-2016, 08:06 PM   #20 (permalink)
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"...each [one] is a rod and pickle for Japan."

Mot be a localism?

It does show how it was done (in halves). Speaking of stealth and performance:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horten_Ho_229
Quote:
The H.IX was of mixed construction, with the center pod made from welded steel tubing and wing spars built from wood. The wings were made from two thin, carbon-impregnated plywood panels glued together with a charcoal and sawdust mixture.
The center section was a tube frame for the landing gear, engines and cockpit, while the outer 2/3 was like the Mosquito with added charcoal for more stealth.

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