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Old 11-08-2011, 01:30 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Has anyone seen or installed a DynoValve?

I'm considering purchasing and installing one of these products, which is an electronically controlled replacement for a car's PCV valve. The "results" posted by the company and by the few reviews I've read seem impressive, but I'm sort of skeptical due to the scarcity of published empirical evidence. The device has won an award or two (including the Green and Health Expo's Emerald Award for most outstanding product), and claims to reduce emissions while boosting mpg and engine life. The company, however, is very small, and I have yet to read a real, blunt third party review of the product by an auto magazine or anything of the like. I figured if anyone has tested it out and knows what's what, its someone on this board. So, does it work? Is it worth the money? and if nobody has tried it, does it look worth trying?

The company that makes the product is called SaviCorp and is based out of Santa Ana, CA.

Thanks in advance for your opinions.

 
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Old 11-08-2011, 01:49 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Welcome to EM.

Sounds like it needs to be parked next to a unicorn?
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Old 11-08-2011, 02:24 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SecondNature View Post
I'm considering purchasing and installing one of these products, which is an electronically controlled replacement for a car's PCV valve. The "results" posted by the company and by the few reviews I've read seem impressive, but I'm sort of skeptical due to the scarcity of published empirical evidence. The device has won an award or two (including the Green and Health Expo's Emerald Award for most outstanding product), and claims to reduce emissions while boosting mpg and engine life. The company, however, is very small, and I have yet to read a real, blunt third party review of the product by an auto magazine or anything of the like. I figured if anyone has tested it out and knows what's what, its someone on this board. So, does it work? Is it worth the money? and if nobody has tried it, does it look worth trying?

The company that makes the product is called SaviCorp and is based out of Santa Ana, CA.

Thanks in advance for your opinions.
ok, you should of posted link to company/product but anyway .

After looking at the product and what it is doing , I would have to say i don't think much of it as they do on bettering the PVC system .

lets first look at a properly running PVC system , whether its a orifice or spring loaded valve , the PVC draws from crankcase into the engine IM but it also is pulling fresh air from the vent tube on valve cover to aircleaner/intake tube .

So unless you have really bad blowby that OEM PVC can't pull anymore than the valve lets in i don't see much to opening it up more .

On to what happening, well if you remove the restriction of PVC at low speeds it means your bypassing the throttle body air as your letting in more through valve.
This is where mpg comes from as on injected motor the throttle sensor is now not seeing extra air so in affect it could be leaning and affecting ignition timing depending on how its programed (OEM ECU )

Why don't they show some emission readings before an after ? . That would be first thing I would show on a device like this .

[ links removed - just google the company if you want]



Last edited by EdKiefer; 11-08-2011 at 02:40 PM..
 
Old 11-08-2011, 02:38 PM   #4 (permalink)
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he can't post links or pics because he is a first time poster.

why didn't you post a link if you saw it?????
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Old 11-08-2011, 02:51 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I can't tell what their device does different than a PCV valve. So I can't call BS on it just yet. I am very very skeptical though
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Old 11-08-2011, 03:29 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ConnClark View Post
I can't tell what their device does different than a PCV valve. So I can't call BS on it just yet. I am very very skeptical though
right, I can see at certain rpm it maybe able to flow more flow depending on vacuum but at 399$ thats is a lot to re-cope .

Also with OEM going electronic EGR, Purge control , I find it odd if any big gains why this is not stock.
Its just a simple flow solenoid with pulse modulation .
 
Old 11-08-2011, 07:55 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
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Welcome to EM.

Sounds like it needs to be parked next to a unicorn?
The same thought crossed my mind when I read the post.
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Old 11-08-2011, 08:59 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I concede that it might be possible for this Dynovalve to work as advertised. However, I'd have to test it myself in order to be sure, one way or another.

It might well be a more aggressive form of PCV valve, and it might actually induct air through the engine itself. If so, it could effectively partially bypass the throttle body, which would reduce pumping losses somewhat.

But it does have a whiff of unicorn-ness, though.
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Old 11-08-2011, 10:14 PM   #9 (permalink)
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IF it did partially bypass the throttle body, would you not simply let up on the pedal to compensate, leaving the engine with exactly the same pumping losses as before?
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Old 11-08-2011, 11:00 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Lee View Post
IF it did partially bypass the throttle body, would you not simply let up on the pedal to compensate, leaving the engine with exactly the same pumping losses as before?
The driver would likely let up on the gas pedal to compensate, but that does not mean the engine would revert to the exact same pumping losses as before.

A throttle valve gives throttle control at the expense of a pressure loss induced across the throttle valve itself. There's no way around it. At the actual opening point in the throttle valve itself, the sonic velocity of the fluid (air in the case of a butterfly throttle for a gasoline engine) limits the flow through the throttle valve. Small openings will only admit small amounts of the fluid to be passed, and the passed fluid will expand in volume once it gets past the actual throttle valve opening. That incurrs a throttling loss by itself.

Now, along with this unavoidable loss, there is an additional loss incurred with butterfly valves because the butterfly valve is itself an inherently high-drag device at low throttle settings. The air past a butterfly valve forms eddies and regions of higher vacuum right past the butterfly plate. It's exactly the same principle as with the rear ends of cars as they pass through the air at speed.

Poppet valves are more efficient at throttling than butterfly valves, but they do not give as wide a range of throttling control that butterfly valves give. In order to maintain a fine amount of control using only poppet valves, many different-sized poppets are needed, and a cam mechanism is needed to schedule opening each poppet valve in sequence to give fine throttling control. This is a common form of control on steam turbine-powered ships.

Now, if you combine a butterfly valve with a small electrically operated poppet valve (such as this nifty Dyno-whatsit gadget), the small poppet valve can be cycled open at light loading, allowing less air to pass through the butterfly valve, reducing the drag losses through the butterfly valve while retaining desired part-throttle control. Keep in mind there'd still be losses due to maintaining a high intake vacuum, and there'd be losses because of the actual throttling action taking place, but the aerodynamic drag losses through the butterfly valve would be minimized.

However, that's a rather complicated arrangement, and it would take a fair amount of genius to incorporate that into a gasoline engine without having its engine computer throw a fit of some sort.

Hm... I might experiment with this. I have 6 vacuum valves laying around my garage.

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