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Old 06-16-2010, 08:02 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Turtle Hello from Norway

Hi everyone (and excuse my English, it hasn't been exercised for a few years)!


I am new to this whole eco-driving thing, although I am and have always been interested in different kinds of optimization. Only earlier it have been in terms of power and performance (not owned any fast cars though, mostly this manifested itself in tuning and modding mopeds when I was that age). I am not sure if I am going to do any mods (at least not any heavy mods) to my car now either, but I am interested in the subject nonetheless

My girlfriend and I just bought a 1999 Chrysler Grand Voyager, equipped for wheelchair transport (my gf is the one in the chair). This combination of a heavy, lesser motorized car (weighs about 2300kg/5070lbs with us two in, 2.4L, 4speed automatic), which rides high with a soft suspension (about 5cm/2in higher than factory due to lowered floor/air suspension) does not exactly send me on a "power trip", so i found that honing my driving skills for maximum comfort and economy is the way to go to keep things interesting.

I have not recorded any data on fuel usage so far as this car is new to us, but I will keep records from now on. I have also ordered a ScanGauge II, can't wait to get it (I'm a gadget freak!).

Unfortunately, the roads around here (as in most parts of this country) are rather tight, twisty and hilly, and I will probably never see real awesome MPG's, but at least the hills and turns make for a more exciting drive

We're going on a road trip to Paris this summer, though, it will be interesting to see the difference in fuel economy on the continental European highways vs Norwegian roads.

Any tips or comments? Please post

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Old 06-16-2010, 08:27 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Welcome to the site Pappnese.

Be sure to check out our driving tips/techniques list.
100+ Hypermiling / ecodriving tips & tactics for better mpg - EcoModder.com

I'm sure you can do a few mods to it. Airing up the tires to max sidewall is quite an easy one.
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Old 06-16-2010, 11:04 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Hello, welcome to EcoModder
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappnese View Post
I am not sure if I am going to do any mods (at least not any heavy mods) to my car now
Yeah, everyone says that in the beginning

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappnese View Post
Unfortunately, the roads around here (as in most parts of this country) are rather tight, twisty and hilly, and I will probably never see real awesome MPG's, but at least the hills and turns make for a more exciting drive
Try engine braking on the downhills. This should cut the fuel, letting you coast almost for free.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pappnese View Post
We're going on a road trip to Paris this summer, though, it will be interesting to see the difference in fuel economy on the continental European highways vs Norwegian roads.

Any tips or comments? Please post
A grille block and a block heater since you live in a cold climate.

Remove any racks or railings from the roof, those hurt bad.

Before your trip you should try a few aero mods, like smooth wheel covers or a bellypan. These are hard to notice, so easy to get past your Significant Other Rear wheel skirts and/or a mini-Kammback would help noticeably.
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Piwoslaw's Peugeot 307sw modding thread

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Old 06-16-2010, 04:10 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Thanks for the welcomes and tips

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Originally Posted by Daox View Post
I'm sure you can do a few mods to it. Airing up the tires to max sidewall is quite an easy one.
I had them to something in between the car manufacturers specs and max sidewall, but I have maxed them out now They are brand new Michelin Energy Savers, so they have rather low rolling resistance.

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Originally Posted by Piwoslaw View Post

Yeah, everyone says that in the beginning
OK, I have to admit, I just came home after visiting the hardware store, I bought some sheet metal and something to cut it with Took a look under the car, and there, about a foot rear of the front tires, I found mudflaps, almost 20% of the car width EACH, hanging almost to the ground. I figure they are there to protect the floor (which is plywood). Also, there is a couple of transverse beams supporting the plywood (which is a little more than a foot wide, from the "frame beam" out), behind the mudflap. And if I fasten a little sheet metal, from the mudflap and about 3 feet back, this will cover it all, and there will be a flush surface between the side skirt and the "frame beam" instead of a ground-sweeping mudflap, a 3 inches deep hole and a couple of transverse beams And the wood should be at least as good protected as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piwoslaw View Post
Try engine braking on the downhills.
Engine braking and DFCO is a well known concept already Also trying to learn how much throttle I can give it in different speeds without the lock-up releasing. Can't wait for the ScanGauge to get some precision to this.

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Originally Posted by Piwoslaw View Post
A grille block and a block heater since you live in a cold climate.

Remove any racks or railings from the roof, those hurt bad.
The car is equipped with a block heater, but unfortunately I don't have access to any outlet where I park. The car also has a Webasto gas heater, but that doesn't save much fuel, I guess Roof racks are long gone, but the rails are still there. Haven't looked into removing them yet.
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Old 06-16-2010, 04:35 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Pappnese View Post
Also trying to learn how much throttle I can give it in different speeds without the lock-up releasing. Can't wait for the ScanGauge to get some precision to this.
I don't know if you've seen Orange4boy's thread on using a switch to take control over the torque converter?
Freezing the Slushbox. Torque Converter on-demand lockup switch.

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Originally Posted by Pappnese View Post
excuse my English, it hasn't been exercised for a few years
Geez, I can't imagine how good it was a few years ago!
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e·co·mod·ding: the art of turning vehicles into what they should be

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Piwoslaw's Peugeot 307sw modding thread

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Old 06-17-2010, 11:47 AM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piwoslaw View Post
I don't know if you've seen Orange4boy's thread on using a switch to take control over the torque converter?
I was about to do it on my last car ('92 Volvo 960 3.0) along with semiautomatic control of the tranny, but not for eco driving purposes, more for the fun of the project itself.

I won't dare it on the Chrysler though, since the "slushbox" in that one is controlled by a fuzzy-logic ECU that complains loudly if something messes with its measured and controlled slip of the converter and tranny clutches. A converter lock-up switch will most probably function as a limp-home-mode switch, from what I've heard and read. Those transmissions are fragile and prone to trouble enough as it is

A good idea nonetheless

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