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Old 08-04-2014, 10:50 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sendler View Post
Must have been a crazy tail wind on the highway leg for Alan's streamliner to improve from 133 mpgUS last year with no changes to the bike.
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Maybe he has been reading Ecomodder to learn some "tricky riding".
I was behind Alan most of the ride. Nothing tricky by him or anyone else. We got separated into subgroups a couple of times due to traffic lights, but other than that everyone seemed to be moving together; accelerating together, etc. He was waving at passerbys going the opposite direction. That could be considered tricky inside that cage of his.

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Old 08-04-2014, 11:05 AM   #32 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by JeffM View Post
Greg, Alan and Fred are pretty close. Last May Fred's mileage was 149.68 mpg over a 116 mile course and Alan achieved 144.28 mpg.

I get what you are saying about diesel vs. gas but I think I'd rather ride Alan's bike over a longer distance vs. Fred's. Alan's looks much more comfortable.

Fred


Alan
After seeing these rides in real life, and no disrespect to Alan, Vic, or Craig, but Fred's streamliner is much better as a home-made, modified vehicle, from a quality and fit and finish standpoint. It wins best-looking streamliner by any measure. Additionally, one can sit up and still feel like he or she is riding a MC. One other thing I noticed was that my torquier 670 and Fred's two torquier diesels, when I was up there with them just behind the Harleys leading,, we didn't drop off or slow our speed whatsoever up the hills. Together, when it was our three rides up front, there would be some separation between us and them each time. Not alot but a few hundred yards or so. The 250s would slow ever so slightly in the natural lag caused by increasing throttle input, and waiting on the power response. A natural occurance in vehicles that get torque @ higher RPM. Me and the diesels though, we just trucked right up w/o our power trains even detecting a difference. I think that's a positive attribute. A more refined riding experience. To say that Alan and Fred are close fuel economy wise, that is true, but Fred's diesel is much more capable when he needs it or wants it to be with 31 hp and 35 peak foot lbs of torque at the wheel.

Last edited by gregsfc; 08-04-2014 at 11:13 AM.. Reason: grammer
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Old 08-04-2014, 11:51 AM   #33 (permalink)
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Back in the day, Craig's competitions were no-holds-barred - whatever you could think of to get the big numbers.

The entrants were tiny and smooth, and the numbers were over 400 MPG.

Things have changed, and the competition is more practical now. No tricky riding (P&G) and no more tiny bikes that require a tight tuck. The big winner (edit: back then)was obviously doing P&G, as he modified the trans so he could get a neutral from top gear.

Some info and photos about those days from Craig's site - 1983 Fuel Economy Contest

I miss those days...

Last edited by jkv357; 08-04-2014 at 09:12 PM..
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Old 08-04-2014, 11:54 AM   #34 (permalink)
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Honda CBR250R FI Single - '11 Honda CBR250R
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90 day: 38.51 mpg (US)

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90 day: 104.48 mpg (US)

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There was definitely something odd going on with the fill ups this year. Many of the known competitors were up 20-30% over last year with the exact same bike.
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All vehicles get lower economy in cold weather. There is more wasted energy in heating up the incoming air.
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The Hayes streamliner is looking good this year with the new tail. I'm surprised he didn't win. He always wins. But I don't understand why his fuel capacity is so small that he has been seen to dump fuel into his tank from a pop bottle at the mid way break. I wonder if he has done anything to improve the handling? Seeing the way that thing shakes in truck wakes in downright scary.
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Old 08-04-2014, 01:52 PM   #35 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sendler View Post
There was definitely something odd going on with the fill ups this year. Many of the known competitors were up 20-30% over last year with the exact same bike.
.
All vehicles get lower economy in cold weather. There is more wasted energy in heating up the incoming air.
.
The Hayes streamliner is looking good this year with the new tail. I'm surprised he didn't win. He always wins. But I don't understand why his fuel capacity is so small that he has been seen to dump fuel into his tank from a pop bottle at the mid way break. I wonder if he has done anything to improve the handling? Seeing the way that thing shakes in truck wakes in downright scary.
1. I don't see how there was anything odd about the fillups other than everyone is on their honor to fill to the same level before and after. This was my first thought about my own ride; either I somehow filled more to the top before starting than I did when I returned or at any fill up I've ever conducted, or something different or better about the Shell gas near the hotel, which I used both before and after. I even used the same pumps as I was the 2nd one in and went right back to the same spot and filled the same way to the same level. The better or more energy-dense gas theory falls through, because my next tank, with the same fuel, from the same pump, running around the Mansfield area, netted me around 78 mpg. The idea that I somehow got more gas in the tank than I ever have before theory also falls through, because on the way home I experimented with this; vented until I got to the tippy top, and my mpg was from 77-80, which is back to normal.

2. I vaguely have an understanding about the factors that cause worse fuel economy in the winter time, but this is significant. All vehicles I've had lose mpg in the winter, maybe 4-5 percent, but I've never had one that loses 12%. My diesel car doesn't lose that much, and the winter blend fuel is much less energy dense than summer; not so much difference with gasoline blends. On my first tank going up to the Vetter event on the CTX700, I started with a cold engine and it was 57 degrees outside. I was going a little faster than in the event and I didn't tuck, but that still can't explain how the same vehicle that got 97 in the event, 80 in regular summertime commuting, got only 69 on this cooler ride. Fred knew the answer. I don't understand his explanation, but I think he's on to something. He's got something that regulates his water temp he says and he told me that his doesn't vary that much. In fact, that's how I started the conversation. I asked him if he loses much mpg in cold weather. He said no.

3. Yeah, I saw Fred's streamliner squirrel around a few times, like when his tires would contact the yellow paint or something, but most of the time he was steady. Of course it was very calm out that day. He killed the engine once at an intersection and had to catch back up to get in his spot up front. I think he said that he was inadvertently in 2nd gear or something like that. It took him a little bit to get it started. He was still cranking when I passed him. His wife says that's the same bike that does the Bonneville flat runs, except they replace the saddle boxes with a tail. No gearing change or anything she said. Same configuration except for the tail. And he has another one that is turbo charged, but the one in the Vetter events is the non-turbo charged version that has topped out at 130 mph or so.

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