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Old 09-23-2019, 07:52 AM   #31 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by cRiPpLe_rOoStEr View Post
But does it have some auxiliary heater to prevent the Diesel from jellying inside the tank in the winter? I'm aware it's not an uncommon feature in some European trucks and bus frames.

No, it recirculates the fuel in the filter and controls temperature with a thermostat. Our climate is tempered, no jellying problems here.


Not so likely, unless it had some electric heating element similar to the injectors of some Brazilian port-injection flexfuel cars.
It's a direct injection diesel, so the half injector's body is inside the head. Since the flow inside the injector is very slow I believe it heats the fuel a little more to 60~70ºC maybe after the engine reach full working temperature.

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Old 09-23-2019, 01:57 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Old 09-23-2019, 10:38 PM   #33 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by jorgemiguel4 View Post
It's a direct injection diesel, so the half injector's body is inside the head. Since the flow inside the injector is very slow I believe it heats the fuel a little more to 60~70ºC maybe after the engine reach full working temperature.
Not so sure if that would lead to a consistent heating of the fuel. Otherwise, any pre-heating to allow a safe usage of vegetable oils throughout an entire run even after engine temperatures stabilized would become redundant. So I'd still consider pre-heating even using regular Diesel fuel.
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Old 09-24-2019, 01:48 AM   #34 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by cRiPpLe_rOoStEr View Post
Not so sure if that would lead to a consistent heating of the fuel. Otherwise, any pre-heating to allow a safe usage of vegetable oils throughout an entire run even after engine temperatures stabilized would become redundant. So I'd still consider pre-heating even using regular Diesel fuel.
Heated tanks and lines are pretty common on heavy duty diesels but most people in the USA with diesel cars or small trucks just use an anti-gelling additive in the winter.

This $10 bottle treats 320 gallons of fuel.

https://www.amazon.com/Howes-103060-...omotive&sr=1-4
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Old 09-26-2019, 10:59 PM   #35 (permalink)
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Heated tanks and lines are pretty common on heavy duty diesels but most people in the USA with diesel cars or small trucks just use an anti-gelling additive in the winter.
In Brazil it was common to mix kerosene on Diesel fuel, with many gas stations formerly having a kerosene pump beside the Diesel pump. AFAIK now only some Petrobras stations still have it. Regarding heated tanks, IIRC some Scania bus frames imported from Sweden had it as an option, even though the locally-made ones didn't.
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Old 10-04-2019, 08:41 PM   #36 (permalink)
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Hi,

If your are not stuck to aero mods you could use a tune , larger injectors, hammer mod to increase power and fuel economy (of course not at the same time ...increased power means increased fuel usage BUT if you drive like normal those mods will help fuel economy (other mods include gutting the muffler and cat) but if you get smog checked that may not fly.

A flat under car pan may help , side skirts that deflect air round the rear wheels may help too (large road tractor trailers find it helps)....
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Old 10-06-2019, 11:41 AM   #37 (permalink)
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Welcome Jorge. I have done “stealthy” aerodynamic mods to my Golf TDI and improved my mpg and coasting distances significantly. From outside the car you would only see the deleted passenger side mirror (and the folded driver’s on the lightly traveled highway). I blocked the upper grill with black pipe insulation stuffed between the grill bars. There seems to be plenty of airflow through the bottom grill. I have a Panzer plate that starts a bumper to bumper belly pan. I installed Votex side skirts painted to body code and used plastic rain gutter halves for inner and outer side skirts like the Aerocivic. I deleted the muffler mostly to make the rear diffuser angle better. I used rain gutter to make strakes that line up with the rear spring perches to complete the rear diffuser. I have small spats ahead of the front and rear tires. Please check out my albums and fuel log for more details.

https://ecomodder.com/forum/member-c...n+install.html

VW did a pretty good job on the outside but the underside is a mess. My coasting distances are much, much better than before the underbody aero mods. Good luck with yours.
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The power needed to push an object through a fluid increases as the cube of the velocity. Mechanical friction increases as the square, so increasing speed requires progressively more power.
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Old 10-06-2019, 02:22 PM   #38 (permalink)
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Also, I sealed up around the rear wheelwells with aluminum flashing.
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The power needed to push an object through a fluid increases as the cube of the velocity. Mechanical friction increases as the square, so increasing speed requires progressively more power.
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Old 10-06-2019, 10:17 PM   #39 (permalink)
It's all about Diesel
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COcyclist View Post
From outside the car you would only see the deleted passenger side mirror (and the folded driver’s on the lightly traveled highway).
Quote:
I deleted the muffler mostly to make the rear diffuser angle better.
I'm sure the OP would get in trouble with such mods

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