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Old 10-19-2020, 04:14 PM   #21 (permalink)
It's all about Diesel
 
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Originally Posted by Ecky View Post
What I've decided to do is a combination of things: one very small (8") attic fan at the rear, on a thermostat and humidistat
This might be more effective regarding humidity than those passive roof turbines. I remember a swamp-cooler factory in my hometown claimed their swamp-coolers led the roof turbines of the service area of a Fiat dealer to slow down due to the temperature decrease.


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A ridge vent would have been ideal, but it isn't in the cards this year.
If you get the ridge vent, remember to use a bug screen or some other trap to prevent vermin to get in.

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Old 10-28-2020, 01:49 PM   #22 (permalink)
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attic temps

I'm late to the discussion, so sorry if I'm repeating info.
When in the West Texas Solar Energy Society, the common metric for adequate attic ventilation was that, when measured directly above the insulation surface, the dry-bulb temperature should not exceed 10-degrees above that of the ambient outdoor dry-bulb temp..
If it's 100- F outside, 150-F inside the attic under the roof, but 110- F just above the attic blanket, it's okay. The insulation is 'blind' to heat stratification that your head experiences when standing there. Measure at your feet.
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If the HVAC system and ductwork are in the attic, then long-wave, infrared radiation is an issue ( its in an oven now ), and a radiant barrier can be just as much an issue.
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If all the HVAC system is in a furdown and closet, below the ceiling, or under the house, it doesn't matter so much about the radiant load, unless you have finished living spaces right below the roof.
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Old 10-28-2020, 02:02 PM   #23 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aerohead View Post
I'm late to the discussion, so sorry if I'm repeating info.
When in the West Texas Solar Energy Society, the common metric for adequate attic ventilation was that, when measured directly above the insulation surface, the dry-bulb temperature should not exceed 10-degrees above that of the ambient outdoor dry-bulb temp..
If it's 100- F outside, 150-F inside the attic under the roof, but 110- F just above the attic blanket, it's okay. The insulation is 'blind' to heat stratification that your head experiences when standing there. Measure at your feet.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If the HVAC system and ductwork are in the attic, then long-wave, infrared radiation is an issue ( its in an oven now ), and a radiant barrier can be just as much an issue.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
If all the HVAC system is in a furdown and closet, below the ceiling, or under the house, it doesn't matter so much about the radiant load, unless you have finished living spaces right below the roof.
No ducting in this house, and there's no cooling load either. It's a rare day indeed that I set the mini split to cool.

The house is a long ranch style and is heated at one end by a pellet stove, and at the other by a mini split. The temperature delta on the coolest nights been room temperature and outside air can (rarely) be as much as 100 degrees. More typically it's 60-70 degrees.
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Old 10-30-2020, 11:09 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cRiPpLe_rOoStEr View Post
If you get the ridge vent, remember to use a bug screen or some other trap to prevent vermin to get in.
Leaves are a big deal also
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Old 11-01-2020, 01:08 AM   #25 (permalink)
It's all about Diesel
 
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Leaves are a big deal also
Of course, but my main concern would still be vermin, or birds nesting. They can do some real mess.

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