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Old 05-19-2013, 05:33 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Have you tried the usual?
Cold air or rammed air intake, belt driven fan delete?

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Old 05-19-2013, 09:02 PM   #12 (permalink)
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I haven't figured out yet whether getting rid of the belt-driven fan would be practical given that I'll be towing, especially when combined with a grille blocker. Would there be enough airflow?

Also, what's a "Cold air or rammed air intake"?
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Old 05-19-2013, 09:19 PM   #13 (permalink)
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A Cold Air Intake (or CAI) means that you route the point of air entry (into the intake tract) to a point of fresh air outside of the engine compartment. Because it is not underhood, it is "cold", relative to under hood temps.

FWIU - diesel engines respond favorably (both fuel mileage and power wise) to a cooler/denser intake change. Many gasoline engines tend to respond favorably to (1) CAI for horsepower but (2) WAI for mileage. These are general rules of thumb, and I am sure exceptions apply.
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Old 05-20-2013, 05:19 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NedTheHead View Post
I haven't figured out yet whether getting rid of the belt-driven fan would be practical given that I'll be towing, especially when combined with a grille blocker. Would there be enough airflow?
You can replace the belt-driven fan with an electric one, and its savings justify for how cheap this mod is.
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Old 05-20-2013, 06:42 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Drive fewer miles while accomplishing the same work. Fewer cold starts by combining errands and plannng the route for best mpg.

Drive the remaining miles at a higher skill level. Be willing to take on changes -- comfortable ones, but changes to driving style nonetheless -- and make them permanent.

Here is where you spend money to make money:

1] Records. All gallons & all miles with notes for year-to-year comparison. Average mpg and average mph are what count.

2] Start with a mechanical baseline to the truck. All book maintenance and taking nothing for granted (alignment, brake drag, steering wander) to see where time & miles call for replacement on schedule or ahead. Re-set the clock as much as possible.

Safety and FE tend to go hand-in-hand. Yellowed/opaqe headlight assemblies, fpr example, are completely unacceptable from the standpoint of light output, thus safety & FE (as one cannot see far enough ahead to make good decisions about time/distance). Wipers/washers are another. Broken down seat cushions. Pitted windshield. Etc.

Longevity and reliability are the "economy" of vehicle expected to do work. PM Big Dave and ask his opinion of aftermarket "fixes" that work toward this end before you start reading Ford Truck enthusiast sites. A bulletproof transmission (what company, what parts, etc) is highly important, for example.

How long you will keep it, and how many miles it will cover is central to what one ought to do (past safety). Make that decision and much else falls into place.

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Last edited by slowmover; 05-20-2013 at 06:52 AM..
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Old 06-03-2013, 04:45 AM   #16 (permalink)
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I say - ignore the doubters & use the helpful people here & tips to make the best of what you have !

There is nothing wrong with taking your F250 and increasing it by even 10% is a big deal for the pocket book.

Here are my first few suggestions;

1. LEARN your trucks torque & at what speed it shifts into its highest gear. With the diesels you should be able to run the high torque to your advantage by low RPMS but staying in a high gear to increase your MPG.

2. If you can, change your tires to a lighter/smoother road tire. Less rolling resistance and less spinning weight of rubber will increase your MPG a TON.

3. Tonneau cover. Easily removable/foldable for when you are pulling your fifth wheel - but when you are just driving around - ESPECIALLY with a long box on a truck - it will reduce the drag on the back of your truck & increase your MPG's 1.5-3% at least.

4. Block off your grill when you can (NOT when towing) and it will catch less air. better MPG.

5. CLEAN OUT THAT TRUCK. Trucks have a tendency to carry a lot of stuff (tools, extra fluids, junk, etc.). Less weight means less gas burned to move it.

6. Maintenance. The more slippery your oils/fluids/greases are, the easier your engine parts move & the less work = less gas burned to move you down the road.

These are just a few things to start that are inexpensive and easy to do right away.

LET US KNOW HOW IT GOES !!
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:59 AM   #17 (permalink)
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I am in the same boat as you, living in our travel trailer. I drive an Excursion and tried lots of things for better economy, but driving habits can gain you 4-5 mpg. Increasing from 14 to 18.5 mpg is a big gain for free.

Also short trips kills mileage in these trucks, they like to be warm.
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Old 06-03-2013, 02:32 PM   #18 (permalink)
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Thanks for the advice, everyone.

I haven't driven the truck much since I haven't sold my other slightly more fuel-efficient car yet so I'm still driving that for most things. But there are great ideas here. When the tires need replacing, I'll definitely be getting lighter road tires, and a roll-up tonneau cover is something I've got on my radar screen, too.

I've already removed about 400 lbs of stuff that was bolted onto the truck too (Ramming grille, step bars, tolbox, conventional tow hitch, gooseneck hitch).
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Old 06-03-2013, 06:46 PM   #19 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NedTheHead View Post
I haven't figured out yet whether getting rid of the belt-driven fan would be practical given that I'll be towing, especially when combined with a grille blocker. Would there be enough airflow?

Also, what's a "Cold air or rammed air intake"?
Well, cold air induction specifically uses a wall to separate the engine bay air, and the air flowing from the outside. So, the air coming into the engine bay either A, goes into the bay, or B, goes into the section with the intake, separated.

Rammed air "intake(?)" I have limited knowledge on, but banter has told me it is just a very short tube, usually with a cone or cone like filter. Allowing more air in, often warmer- especially if combined with grille blocking.
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Old 06-04-2013, 10:38 AM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NedTheHead View Post
I haven't figured out yet whether getting rid of the belt-driven fan would be practical given that I'll be towing, especially when combined with a grille blocker. Would there be enough airflow?

Also, what's a "Cold air or rammed air intake"?
Electric fans just shift the exact same burden to the electrical system. Are you willing to put it to a higher strain? Might gain a little in solo driving, but the question always exists as to whether an aftermarket set of e-fans is capable of the same duty rating as the mechanical fan.

As the test of a truck is how it does under maximal loading (payload and trailer; else why have a truck?) it's not a risk I'm willing to take. Were the design as good as what Shepherd777 works with I'd be more confident.

Best tire/shock choice, perfect alignment and zero steering slop is a better goal.

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