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Old 10-27-2008, 11:25 PM   #31 (permalink)
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I found something from Hot Rod Magazine. They did dyno testing of an engine before and after applying coatings. It looks like the engine gained about 2% torque at 2100 RPM after adding the thermal barrier.

A Look at High-Tech Engine Coatings and What They are Worth - Hot Rod Magazine

It would make sense that this should be more effective when the engine runs slower because of the greater time to transfer heat. It should also be more effective for engines that have a large bore and short stroke since they have more surface area to absorb heat.

The engine would require less air for the radiator so aerodynamics could be improved too.

I actually did something like this on a Plymouth Horizon. I painted the pistons with white VHT paint. I saw that tip recommended in a book about Chevrolet racing engines. I'm not sure how that affected my fuel economy. I got 44 MPG on the highway with the 1.7 liter engine and the 4 speed "Horizon Miser" transmission.

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Old 10-27-2008, 11:37 PM   #32 (permalink)
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It should also be more effective for engines that have a large bore and short stroke since they have more surface area to absorb heat.
Maybe you can explain? (maybe I'm misreading?)

I was under the impression that optimal conditions are adiabatic. So any heat absorbed into the engine is lost heat. Nominally, the engine doesn't heat up and all heat is transferred to the cold reservoir (in our case, the environment).

Which seems to be in line with the article...
Quote:
...the object is to prevent the migration of heat...
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Old 10-27-2008, 11:54 PM   #33 (permalink)
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Right, adiabatic expansion during the power stroke would be ideal. A cylinder that has a length that is twice the diameter has the lowest possible surface area for a given volume. Therefore, an oversquare engine (larger bore than stroke) would have more heat loss from the air than an undersquare engine. Reducing the heat loss by using a thermal barrier coating would be more important in the oversquare engine.
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Old 10-27-2008, 11:59 PM   #34 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Andyman View Post
Right, adiabatic expansion during the power stroke would be ideal. A cylinder that has a length that is twice the diameter has the lowest possible surface area for a given volume. Therefore, an oversquare engine (larger bore than stroke) would have more heat loss from the air than an undersquare engine. Reducing the heat loss by using a thermal barrier coating would be more important in the oversquare engine.
Gotcha, I read the first post ass backwards My eyes are a bit crossed, I've been playing cad monkey today

Thanks for the clarification
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Old 10-28-2008, 04:05 PM   #35 (permalink)
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Alternator-ively

Here's an old drag-racing trick that'll help with power, thus economy: If you really want to keep the alternator where it belongs on your engine (or if like me you do a lot of night driving), you can either put a larger pulley on your alternator (don't get carried away - it still has to make enough juice to keep your battery charged) or (sometimes) put a smaller pulley on your crankshaft (don't get carried...oh, yeah, I already said that...).

...or was that already up there in the engine area, and I missed it?
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Old 11-03-2008, 06:45 PM   #36 (permalink)
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I just added more problems that hurt fuel economy to the thread about mechanical problems.
http://ecomodder.com/forum/showthrea...nomy-5322.html

There are additional engine problems, plus wheel, transmission, and differential problems. Did I forget anything important?
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Old 11-03-2008, 07:17 PM   #37 (permalink)
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A really simple one is to add an extra spring to the throttle control, I did this to my truck because boots don't offer the same feel as soft shoes.
Makes it harder to accelerate and eliminates a lot of small movements due to bouncing.
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Old 11-18-2008, 01:52 AM   #38 (permalink)
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I have a 1989 Acura Legend. I know it's a V6 and the mileage isn't all that great, but it was given to me. So... is there anything I can do to drastically improve the mileage? I've read the hypermiling and the other tips, but I still don't know the first step. Help please.
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Old 11-18-2008, 12:41 PM   #39 (permalink)
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Hey, sofunky, everyone here pretty well agrees that the best (and easiest) way by far to get better mileage is by "adjusting the nut behind the wheel." That's us, by the way...

How I did it was by making staying off of the brake pedal a game. Watch ahead and anticipate stoplights or turns (when you're not in traffic) and let momentum carry you there. If you get the opportunity, you'll be shocked at how far you can coast from 40 mph in town. Stay under the higher speed limits, since when you reach the 60 mph range every mile per hour makes a difference. Stay locked in behind some SUV, at a safe distance, and let them give you a draft. My favorite, since I have the "AC" button on the dash, is to shut it off when going uphill or when accelerating, to save energy or keep the torque convertor locked in, keeping your engine speed down. Of course, if you don't need it on, keep it shut off!

The tough part is keeping your mind in the game. I've driven in LA before (my youngest brother lives just south of there) and it's pretty crazy. If you'll pretend your car has something really wrong with it, and baby it, or just stay in the slow lane (well, sometimes there's no such thing!), you'll be surprised at how much better you'll do. Shoot, just follow around the "little old ladies" and pretend you can't get into the fast lane! I've managed to get 35% better than EPA by doing just those things in the Intrigue, and it's sized pretty closely to your Acura.

My kid brother rides his bike a lot and bought the special road pass transmitter (or whatever they call it) to stay off of the 10-lane traffic jamb roads. He found he saved enough in gas from avoiding those roll-at-5-mph-for-an-hour traffic jambs to pay for the restricted road access, and can sleep in longer, to boot!

Game on!!!
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Old 11-18-2008, 03:32 PM   #40 (permalink)
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=)

Thanks for the tip. So once I get that going are there any modifications I can do to the car? The Legend doesn't really seem all that light and since it's a V6 I really wanna adjust it so that not only do I get better mileage, but the eco system won't be affected as much.

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