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Old 05-19-2009, 01:12 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Let some penetrating oil seep onto the Field Housing bolts overnight, and then smack them with an impact wrench.


I once jury-rigged a wooden peg and some rubber bands to temporarily squeeze a brush into a holder. I'm certain a professional motor repair guy would have crapped his pants if he ever saw that. It was just to bench test the motor to see if it was worth working on. You also could jumper across the brush that has the broken spring with it's opposite mate, and simply test run the motor with two brushes.


Motors sizes are most often referred to by their diamater.

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Old 05-19-2009, 01:50 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Well, some good and bad news. I found a drive coupler inside the pump that extends the motor shaft enough to mount a sprocket on. The bad news is that the bolts holding the end of the motor onto the pump are either 4.5mm, or imperial. My friend has some imperial allen keys, so we'll have a look. Even worse is the fact that it looks like the bearing is held by the pump

However, I'll take it apart and see what I can do. I could always extend the motor shaft through the pump housing and add a bearing to support it, or lathe up a new end cap. I have lots of time, as I finish my GCSE exams in a few weeks, and have a 3 month holiday.
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Old 05-19-2009, 05:25 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Feel free to do whatever you feel is appropriate.

For what it's worth, my recommendation is to not use any motor that doesn't have a bearing in it's own end plate. I was afraid that this one might have the bearing buried inside the pump, but you can't know for sure until you get the thing apart.

This size of motor is extremely plentiful. This particular motor has given you a good introductory education. You'll probably save time and money by taking another trip to a Lift Salvage Yard and trying to find another ugly rusty treasure. Sometimes the best decisions in life are picking your battles and knowing when to walk away.

Now that you've educated yourself somewhat, you have a much better idea what to look for when scrounging around a salvage yard. The best bargains are the motors with two good bearings, a nice long keyed drive shaft, good brushes, no signs of burnt copper, and lots of disgusting dirt, rust, grime, and grunge. The dirtier and more crappy the general appearance of the motor the cheaper it will be.

It appears to be about a 4.5 incher (+/-). You'd be surpised how many of these size motors can be had for nothing, or almost nothing. Many don't need any new components. They simply need a really good cleaning and maybe a short spin on the lathe for the commutator.

The ugly dirty motors that have all the important internal parts can usually get haggled down to whatever the going rate is for the price of the scrap metal, maybe a little extra just to make it worth the yard owner's time to sell it to you.



That said... your time is yours. If you want to custom machine an end cap with a bearing, be my guest. Be sure to post pictures, it would be fun to see what you come up with.



Best Wishes.

Last edited by slurryguy; 05-19-2009 at 05:36 PM..
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Old 05-19-2009, 07:12 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slurryguy View Post
Feel free to do whatever you feel is appropriate.

For what it's worth, my recommendation is to not use any motor that doesn't have a bearing in it's own end plate. I was afraid that this one might have the bearing buried inside the pump, but you can't know for sure until you get the thing apart.

This size of motor is extremely plentiful. This particular motor has given you a good introductory education. You'll probably save time and money by taking another trip to a Lift Salvage Yard and trying to find another ugly rusty treasure. Sometimes the best decisions in life are picking your battles and knowing when to walk away.

Now that you've educated yourself somewhat, you have a much better idea what to look for when scrounging around a salvage yard. The best bargains are the motors with two good bearings, a nice long keyed drive shaft, good brushes, no signs of burnt copper, and lots of disgusting dirt, rust, grime, and grunge. The dirtier and more crappy the general appearance of the motor the cheaper it will be.

It appears to be about a 4.5 incher (+/-). You'd be surpised how many of these size motors can be had for nothing, or almost nothing. Many don't need any new components. They simply need a really good cleaning and maybe a short spin on the lathe for the commutator.

The ugly dirty motors that have all the important internal parts can usually get haggled down to whatever the going rate is for the price of the scrap metal, maybe a little extra just to make it worth the yard owner's time to sell it to you.



That said... your time is yours. If you want to custom machine an end cap with a bearing, be my guest. Be sure to post pictures, it would be fun to see what you come up with.



Best Wishes.
Close, it's a 5 inch motor Judging by what you said, I think I'll see what else I can get hold of. This motor will run fine, the only problem is the end cap. If I can't find another, I'll keep working on this one. I've seen an endcap machined for a car starter motor, we used one in our electric drag racer (what a POS that was. The spec said the motor did 2.5k RPM. Ours did 5k! It was stupidly overgeared and the parachute never even opened!).

It was a pretty simple affair to do, and no more complex than an RC car axle or gear holder (done both on a worn out lathe in school, quite a task with that amount of slop and those tolerances). The limiting factor is the cost of aluminium stock, and I think for the price it would be easier to just find another motor, or at least an endcap that will fit. I'll see if I can find some brushes and springs while I'm at it

Thanks for all the input, it's been really helpful! I think I would have just connected it up to a car battery and watched the pretty lights by now otherwise!

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