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Old 07-03-2018, 10:21 PM   #51 (permalink)
Cyborg ECU
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by me and my metro View Post
As long as both sensors donít swing together you wonít get the code. That is much cheaper than a new manifold.
Right?! I get to keep the OEM manifold if this works. Fingers crossed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xist View Post
I like the part where every picture is pointed in a different direction!
I got talents, hey!

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See my car's mod & maintenance thread and my electric bicycle's thread for ongoing projects. I will rebuild Black and Green over decades as parts die, until it becomes a different car of roughly the same shape and color. My minimum fuel economy goal is 55 mpg while averaging posted speed limits. I generally top 60 mpg. See also my Honda manual transmission specs thread.



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Old 07-06-2018, 03:19 PM   #52 (permalink)
Cyborg ECU
 
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It worked

The acid wash technique worked. Here are my SMOG test results before and after. Remember, this CAT survived a leaking head gasket, 260,000 miles of operation, wildly bad chronic fuel trim problems, and it was showing the P0420 code as recently as last weekend. I will update the OP with technique details.

2012:

A couple days after this test in 2012, I got an O2 sensor code.

2016:


2018:
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See my car's mod & maintenance thread and my electric bicycle's thread for ongoing projects. I will rebuild Black and Green over decades as parts die, until it becomes a different car of roughly the same shape and color. My minimum fuel economy goal is 55 mpg while averaging posted speed limits. I generally top 60 mpg. See also my Honda manual transmission specs thread.



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Old 07-06-2018, 07:04 PM   #53 (permalink)
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This is pretty remarkable, @California98Civic. If I ever think I need a new cat, I'll definitely try this. My truck is failing smog right now; High NO ppm was fixed by fixing my exhaust manifold and gaskets, but that brought the HC ppm up too high, so I'm hoping a tune-up will fix that. It's been too long since I did plugs, checked the wires, and cleaned the mass airflow sensor.
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Old 07-06-2018, 11:13 PM   #54 (permalink)
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Woohoo, great!
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Old 07-06-2018, 11:14 PM   #55 (permalink)
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Buy more catalytic converters or platinum bullion.
Platinum is at like a 14 to 16 year low right now.
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Old 07-07-2018, 12:09 AM   #56 (permalink)
Cyborg ECU
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daox View Post
Woohoo, great!
It was sweet. Look at those NO numbers... an 80% reduction from 2016! To my knowledge no others who have posted about their experiences with this procedure have ever showed the benefit with an actual smog readout. This quite proves it can be done at home with crude tools.

Quote:
Originally Posted by a8ksh4 View Post
... My truck is failing smog right now; High NO ppm was fixed by fixing my exhaust manifold and gaskets, but that brought the HC ppm up too high, so I'm hoping a tune-up will fix that. It's been too long since I did plugs, checked the wires, and cleaned the mass airflow sensor.
Definitely check plugs and wires. Test 'em precisely.

I think a reason my emissions numbers might not be even lower might be that I did not have enough flow of the solution through the substrate. The publication that I am imitating claims to have "optimized" the flow rate. My "optimization" was just lifting the cat out and dunking it back in six times each half hour. More flow might have done even better.
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See my car's mod & maintenance thread and my electric bicycle's thread for ongoing projects. I will rebuild Black and Green over decades as parts die, until it becomes a different car of roughly the same shape and color. My minimum fuel economy goal is 55 mpg while averaging posted speed limits. I generally top 60 mpg. See also my Honda manual transmission specs thread.



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Old 07-08-2018, 04:55 PM   #57 (permalink)
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Black and Green - '98 Honda Civic DX Coupe
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Notes for future diagnoses

Part of the text from Help my car failed the Smog check inspection - Smog Check Star Certified Roseville Sacramento Area (lightly edited)

Quote:
Emissions:

Concentration of combustion products in the vehicle's exhaust, most of which pollute the air, give important diagnostic clues to the vehicle's engine function and condition. The component gases which contribute the most to air pollution are hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). This is not N2O (NITROUS). Three of the five gases measured at the tailpipe are regulated pollutants - HC, CO and NOx. The remaining gases, oxygen (O2) And carbon dioxide (CO2), while non-regulated, play a significant role as diagnostic aids. The four gas analyzer measures HC, CO, CO2 and O2 concentrations. The five gas analyzer (BAR 97) adds the measurement of NOx.

The exhaust gas analyzer is a highly accurate test instrument. It can assist in diagnosing, fuel, exhaust, emission control, and engine service problems. Following are a few general facts to keep in mind when using the gas analyzer:

1) High Carbon Monoxide (CO) readings usually indicate a fuel mixture richer than ideal (rich mixture - air fuel ratio below 14.7). In general CO is an indicator of combustion efficiency. The amount of CO in a vehicleís exhaust is directly related to its air-fuel ratio. High CO levels result from inadequate O2 supply needed for complete combustion. This is caused by a too rich mixture - too much fuel (AFR readings below the optimal 14.7, Lambda below 1.0). If your vehicle failed the Smog Inspection and has a high C.O. level, This should always be fixed first. Circumstances that can lead to high CO emissions:

* Dirty or restricted air filters

*Excessively dirty or contaminated oil

*Saturated charcoal canister

*Non-Functioning PCV valve system

*Improper operation of the fuel delivery system

*Improperly functioning thermactor system

*Catalytic converter intervention and CO concentrations
High CO readings at the tailpipe are an clear indication that there is a problem in at least one part of the system, but an CO reading that appears within "normal" ranges or is only modestly elevated is not necessarily a reliable indicator of proper or even acceptable system performance. Low range C.O. readings are possible, and not uncommon, from a malfunctioning engine equipped with a properly functioning catalytic converter. In such circumstances, truly elevated pre-catalytic converter CO levels will be masked by the catalytic converter and the potential for a CO problem must be further evaluated in the context of other readings of abnormal gas concentrations and AFR / Lambda readings.

2) Normal CO readings. If the combustion process is succeeding at or near the stoichiometric point (AFR equals 14.7, Lambda equals 1.0), C.O. levels during an idle test will typically measure less than 1% Pre-Catalytic Converter.

3) Low CO readings. There is, effectively, no reading for CO that can be characterized as too low or "below optimal". CO concentrations will appear "normal" even in a lean burning environment, where AFR is above 14.7 (Lambda is above 1.0).

4) High hydrocarbon (HC) readings usually indicate excessive unburned fuel caused by a lack of ignition or by incomplete combustion. ALWAYS FIX CO BEFORE HC. Concentrations are measured in parts per million (PPM). Common causes include a faulty ignition system, vacuum leaks, and fuel mixture problems. Circumstances that can lead to a high HC emissions are:

* Incomplete combustion due to fouled spark plugs.

* Improper timing or dwell

* Damaged ignition wires

* Low compression

* Vacuum leak

* Ineffective or faulty air management system (ECM control of air/fuel ratios)

* Catalytic converter intervention and HC concentrations
High HC readings at the tailpipe are an clear indication that there is a problem in at least one part of the system, but an HC reading that appears within "normal" ranges or is only modestly elevated is not necessarily a reliable indicator of proper or even acceptable system performance. HC readings at or near "normal" are possible, and not uncommon. From a malfunctioning engine equipped with a properly functioning catalytic converter. In such circumstances, truly elevated pre-catalytic converter HC levels will be masked by the catalytic converter and the potential for an HC problem must be further evaluated in the context of other readings of abnormal gas concentrations and AFR / Lambda readings.

5) Oxygen (O2) readings. Oxygen, measured as a percentage of the exhaust volume, reflects the amount of gas remaining in the exhaust sample after the combustion process has taken place. Ambient O2 readings should be about 20%, reflecting the natural amount oxygen found in the air. The ideal range for vehicles without a secondary air injection system is less than 1.5%. If there is an air injection system, O2 levels will typically fall in the range of 3% to 4%. Pinching off the air hose of a vehicle equipped with air injection should produce O2 levels similar to those found for vehicles without air injection.

6) High oxygen (O2) readings indicate too lean an air-fuel ratio (AFR higher than 14.7, Lambda greater than 1.0). Circumstances that can lead to high O2 emissions are:

* Lean fuel mixture (AFR above 14.7)

* Vacuum leaks

* Ignition related problems causing misfires.

7) Low O2 indicates a rich fuel mixture (AFR below 14.7, Lambda below 1.0).

8) High carbon dioxide (CO2) readings indicate a nearly ideal air-fuel ratio and efficient combustion

9) Low carbon dioxide (CO2) readings indicate a fuel mixture either too rich or too lean, exhaust system leaks, or sample dilution.

10) Oxides of Nitrogen readings. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx), including nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (NO2), are formed if the combustion temperatures within the combustion chamber exceed some 2,500 degrees F. This can occur when the engine is under load. When excessive temperature conditions exist, the greatest amount of NOx is typically produced at the stoichiometric point (AFR 14.7 or Lambda of 1.0) as the engine is under a light load. If the combustion process within an engine is burning fuel at or near stoichiometric point, NOx levels on acceleration will typically read significantly higher than those measured at cruise and during deceleration. Typically, the NOx readings at idle will be 0 PPM.

11) High NOx Readings. Circumstances that can lead to abnormally high NOx emissions are:

* Malfunctioning EGR valve

* Lean fuel mixture (AFR above 14.7, Lambda above 1.0)

* Improper spark advance

* Thermostatic air heater stuck in the heated air position

* Missing or damaged cold air duct

* Combustion chamber deposits

* Malfunctioning catalytic converter

* Catalytic converter intervention and NOx concentrations
High NOx readings at the tailpipe are an clear indication that there is a problem in at least one part of the system, but an NOx reading that appears within "normal" ranges or is only modestly elevated is not necessarily a reliable indicator of proper or even acceptable system performance. NOx readings at or near "normal" are possible, and not uncommon. From a malfunctioning engine equipped with a properly functioning catalytic converter. In such circumstances, truly elevated pre-catalytic converter NOx levels will be masked by the catalytic converter and the potential for an NOx problem must be further evaluated in the context of other readings of abnormal gas concentrations and AFR / Lambda readings.

12) Low NOx readings. There is, effectively, no reading for NOx that can be characterized as too low or below optimal. NOx is naturally 0 ppm at idle. NOx concentrations may appear normal even in a rich burning environment where the AFR is well below 14.7 (Lambda below 1.0).
__________________
See my car's mod & maintenance thread and my electric bicycle's thread for ongoing projects. I will rebuild Black and Green over decades as parts die, until it becomes a different car of roughly the same shape and color. My minimum fuel economy goal is 55 mpg while averaging posted speed limits. I generally top 60 mpg. See also my Honda manual transmission specs thread.



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Old 07-13-2018, 01:43 PM   #58 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oil pan 4 View Post
Palladium is at like a 16 or 17 year high right now, but rhodium and platinum are relatively low.
I priced catalytic converters ten months ago and each of the four dealerships has raised their price between 8% and over 100%, averaging 57% more.
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Old 10-26-2018, 03:46 PM   #59 (permalink)
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Have you had any indication of rust? I bought another Evan Fischer cat for $86 and the old one definitely looks worse for wear:



So, put down a coat of spray paint after acid-washing?
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Old 10-26-2018, 04:11 PM   #60 (permalink)
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Hope you got a good one. A lot of cats are fakes, or so cheaply made they don't work sufficiently well enough.

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