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Old 06-04-2013, 06:35 AM   #11 (permalink)
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nice!

ive been thinking about the best way to do a trailer for a while now, theres only so much i can carry on my small rear carrier (makes more frequent shopping trips necessary which is both a pain and bad for economy on my motorised bike lol!)

i have a pair of wheels similar to yours laying around Sven7
http://i40.tinypic.com/aw9j4z.jpg

how do they do at speed? obviously my motorised bike will go a bit quicker than your pedal only one but do they show any signs of stress if your really moving like down a hill or something?

im thinking a simple 1"x1" steel frame and hitch for plenty of strength and durability and expanded aluminium mesh for the base to make tying stuff down super easy

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Old 06-04-2013, 06:38 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroMPG View Post
Nice. I like hauling by bike.

Last few days, I moved on my trailer: half a dozen loads of mulch, plus a wheelbarrow.

No pics though, so I might just be making this up.
Sounds like quite a load. Was the fish thiiiiiiiiiis big?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo333 View Post
nice!

ive been thinking about the best way to do a trailer for a while now, theres only so much i can carry on my small rear carrier (makes more frequent shopping trips necessary which is both a pain and bad for economy on my motorised bike lol!)

i have a pair of wheels similar to yours laying around Sven7
http://i40.tinypic.com/aw9j4z.jpg

how do they do at speed? obviously my motorised bike will go a bit quicker than your pedal only one but do they show any signs of stress if your really moving like down a hill or something?

im thinking a simple 1"x1" steel frame and hitch for plenty of strength and durability and expanded aluminium mesh for the base to make tying stuff down super easy
Yeah, those are just $5 wheels from harbor freight. Rated for 350lbs. or something. They wobble a bit and aren't completely smooth going down the road but I think the beads are just seated wrong. No other problems really. 1x1 would be my first choice if i had a welder and some more space. You could even do a simple swing arm rear suspension system!
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Old 06-23-2013, 01:27 PM   #13 (permalink)
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I have & use trailers also. Most are converted yard sale kids trailers (1 Burley, a Rhode Gear, and a decent quality generic. All have aluminum tube frames & aluminum rims. Cheap too - the Burley was $25, but needed rubber. I usually modify the hitch (I ride recumbents) and use air couplings for the hitch - Bikefriday.com sells a similar hitch setup. It's wickedly fast to connect & disconnect, and you can buy the couplers cheap & Harbor Freight.
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Old 06-23-2013, 07:18 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Air quick connectors are quick but not as strong as a solid connector such as a yoke and pin arrangement. If you are using air hose connectors, fill the male end with epoxy steel. The unit is much stronger in shear (right angle to the load) than relying on the unit holding together in tension. A safety strap or chain is a good addition.
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Old 06-23-2013, 09:13 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Grant-53 View Post
Air quick connectors are quick but not as strong as a solid connector such as a yoke and pin arrangement. If you are using air hose connectors, fill the male end with epoxy steel. The unit is much stronger in shear (right angle to the load) than relying on the unit holding together in tension. A safety strap or chain is a good addition.
Just how much shear load do you speculate is on the coupler? More specifically, how much shear is created pulling a 2 wheeled, 20 lb. trailer w/100 lb. payload? I'd wager far less than 15-20 lbs shear load. I would further estimate double that (40-50 lbs.) shear if the trailer catches a pot hole.

Here's the cad for one of mine.... (it regularly endures 150 lb. loads)...



And I've been pulling it with this at 25-30 mph for the last 4 years...

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Old 06-24-2013, 03:01 PM   #16 (permalink)
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If it works, it works. Some of the trailers look like there are going to be some hefty loads. Just remember the material including the spring can wear over time and the load is supported solely by the balls in the groove. I am used to working around trailers for construction equipment as well as my two bike trailers. I tell my boys, "Careful, it's only made of metal."
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Old 06-26-2013, 10:25 AM   #17 (permalink)
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My trailers been up and running for a couple of weeks now, it holds plenty of weight but im having a few handling issues when its not loaded up it tends to get pretty bad sway at far lower speeds than id like, i want to strengthen and possibly redesign the hitch on the bike to fix the problem

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Old 06-29-2013, 12:37 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo333 View Post
My trailers been up and running for a couple of weeks now, it holds plenty of weight but im having a few handling issues when its not loaded up it tends to get pretty bad sway at far lower speeds than id like, i want to strengthen and possibly redesign the hitch on the bike to fix the problem
As much as I dislike the typical hitching off one of the bike's rear stays (usually the LH side), it's about the only acceptable method.

They do it because it keeps the hitch mount low (unlike yours), which not only improves towing, but is safer and more predictable during panic stops. Two suggestions...

1. Hitch off the bike's LH chain stay - if enough threads are exposed, you can mount to the rear axle.

2. remove your trailer's tongue at the bed, then reattach (weld?) it to the LH side of the bed with the arc pointing inward. Length looks about right. Now build your hitch.

Here's a couple of valuable links with many examples of DIY trailers..

Trailer Construction Tips

The post your trailer thread.

Here's just one example in the link above...




Yet another example in the same thread...


Last edited by Kenny; 06-29-2013 at 12:50 AM..
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Old 07-01-2013, 09:11 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Thanks for the tips Kenny

I too disliked the idea of hitching off one of the rear stays but now that ive tried this way i know why they do it like that...

The only problem is my wheels have those quick release clamp on axles so i cant use the axle and nut to hold on the hitch very easily
My main idea to try next is a set of rear stays from a junk bike cut up and mounted backwards with the hitch where the seat tube normally would join on, Then i will brace it either with an old school round steel mudguard or up to the rear carrier so it doesnt move up or down, similar to how most big harley bike trailers are hitched and the same as car hitches (in the middle of the bike at or below axle line)

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Old 07-01-2013, 12:08 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobo333 View Post
My main idea to try next is a set of rear stays from a junk bike cut up and mounted backwards with the hitch where the seat tube normally would join on, Then i will brace it either with an old school round steel mudguard or up to the rear carrier so it doesnt move up or down, similar to how most big harley bike trailers are hitched and the same as car hitches (in the middle of the bike at or below axle line)
Similar to Surly Bikes hitches, except they retain the LH side hitch only.

Bill the Trailer | Bikes | Surly Bikes
http://surlybikes.com//uploads/downl...nstruction.pdf

But the Surly method still mounts off the bike's rear axle, so you'd need to replace the QR with a longer one, or replace the rear axle with a solid axle.

Disregarding the hitch location for a moment, please consider lengthening your trailer's tongue, whatever hitch location you employ. The longer the tongue, the less it negatively effects the bike's handling. Too long and it becomes awkward to navigate tight corners and complicates parking choices. About 18-25" (475-635mm) measured from the leading edge of the bed to the hitch. Also figure on 8-10% tongue weight. (example - if your gross (loaded) trailer weight is, say, 120 lbs, then shoot for approx. 10-12 lbs tongue weight (at the hitch).


Last edited by Kenny; 07-01-2013 at 12:16 PM..
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