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Old 10-27-2018, 06:34 PM   #21 (permalink)
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Cibbie - '88 Honda CBR 250R
Motorcycle
90 day: 58.82 mpg (US)

Rarity - '06 Honda Accord EX V6
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90 day: 35.67 mpg (US)

Baby viff - '86 Honda VFR 400R
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90 day: 59.56 mpg (US)

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhs View Post
Which vfr800?
If you have any experience on this bike play write a sort review.
I donít write short reviews..

Mine was a 1998, dad still has his 1999 which is configured more towards sport touring than sport. VFR 800s got catalytic converters in 2000, and a yellow color option in 2001. In 2002 they got VTEC(yo!), but dropped the awesome gear driven camshafts in favor of chains.

The VFR 800, just like the SV650 is a great all around bike, great at a lot of things, and definitely a bike every rider should try out at least once. It should not be confused for a beginner bike though. It is tall, heavy, and more powerful than the SV650(which could be used as a beginner bike, but isn't a great idea either) The bike has a good amount of low end torque(SV650 feels stronger though), but the tall first gear makes starting off and low speed riding in traffic difficult. The engine doesn't like low speed riding in higher gears below 2500 RPM, and any amount of acceleration in 6th gear below 3000 RPM should be avoided, otherwise you will get an awful rattle/shaking. There is a weird fueling transition you can feel in 6th gear at right around 2200 RPM.

The 800's power leaves little to be desired, as it will power wheelie in 1st gear, or do a rolling burnout depending on the traction of the surface. Me and my dad had switched bikes at one point, he was on my 4 cylinder CBR 250R and I was on his 800. Merging onto a highway he pinned it, 18,000 RPM on my 250 and I could match his acceleration without exceeding 5000 RPM. Honestly, even if this engine couldn't rev above 7000 RPM you could still do just fine with it, but go above that and you have a screaming V4 that could easily confuse someone for a NASCAR. Rev limiter is at 12,500 RPM. The thing sounds seriously cool straight piped. I speak from experience, it only takes about 10 seconds to hit 125 mph(indicated), so it is NOT a slow bike and will kick ass if you know what you are doing. Something I have noticed in common with most motorcycles I have ridden, but especially with this bike is that trying to turn at full throttle is difficult. When you crack that throttle open the bike wants to go straight, and it takes a serious amount of effort to crank it over. Wider bars would offer better leverage.

Like most motorcycles I have ridden, the VFR 800 doesn't manage heat very well. The engine takes a while to reach operating temperature (176F) and is easy to get it to drop below that when riding efficiently. When you hit low speed traffic though, the bike heats up quickly. I have exceeded 240F on mine in traffic. This is a bike for the open road, don't buy one if you will be riding in low speed traffic for a significant portion of your riding time.

Electronic reliability is a downfall for the VFR 800, the regulator rectifiers go bad. My dad had the stator fail on his bike at about 91,000 miles. There are fixes for this however, there is a modification available called the 'VFRness' which improves electrical reliability.

Fuel economy isn't great, around 40-45 MPG with an average rider. I had ridden for part of a tank, and my dad the other part and managed to hit 53 MPG. A whole tank of me riding my 1998 to work (about 7 miles) efficiently, but also giving it a good hoon at least once per trip resulted in 44 MPG. Even in that 7 miles, coolant temperature was around 150F at the end of the trip. Tank is a reasonably sized 5.8 gallons, and can give you 200+ mile tanks for touring. The OEM seat is okay, but the sargent seat on my dad's bike is much more comfy for touring. On a riding trip to Virginia, I got to scoot my brother's SV650S and my dad's VFR 800 around an awesome curvy mountain road. The VFR 800 in its touring configuration(only top case at the time) felt somewhat wallowy when turning hard. SV650S didn't have that problem. I did not however try the 800 without the top case, but I would bet the majority of the wallowing would go away without it.

Anything specific you want to know? My dad has had his for about 16 years and 70,000 miles now.


I put my phone inside the airbox of a VFR 800 to see how the unmuffled intake noise sounded, and it was GLORIOUS.



Here is a video of a straight piped 800 flying by at top speed



If you have fallen for V4s, but want an otherwise reasonable bike, you really can't go wrong with the VFR 800.

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-Kaze o tatakaimasen-

Best trip in V6: 52.0
Best tank in V6: 46.0
Best tank in CBR: 61.3
Best tank in VFR: 62.5
Best tank in SV: 79.5

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroMPG View Post
You can lead a fashion-conscious horse to unusual-looking water...


Last edited by Daschicken; 10-27-2018 at 06:58 PM..
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:55 AM   #22 (permalink)
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Hey Daschicken thank you for the review, I really appreciate your time and effort to write such a comprehensive review!!!
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Old 10-28-2018, 05:58 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Wow ,it sound amazing!! That's with open exhaust I guess.
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:26 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Honda CBR250R FI Single - '11 Honda CBR250R
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I rode a new version Interceptor 800 and was dissapointed. The gearing was too close and the final gearing was so long. And the engine will buck and refuse to pull below 4,000 rpm so that you were forced to clunk down into first when turning onto a different street. Very surprised at the engine bucking from the V4 engine which people romanticize about. A Ninja 650 is much more pleasant to commute on and will pull smoothly from 2,500. And the V4 throws off a ton of waste heat. It will cook you at a stop light on a hot day. Which is telling me that it will not be very fuel efficient. It is a cult bike for sure and has the 4th most Fuelly accounts. Averaging 40 mpgUS.
.
Honda VFR800 Interceptor MPG - Actual MPG from 404 Honda VFR800 Interceptor owners
.
Kawasaki Ninja 650R MPG - Actual MPG from 121 Kawasaki Ninja 650R owners
.
A Honda CBR500R is a super smooth and high speed capable commuter bike with a Fuelly average of 65 mpgUS and hypermiling riders will break 80 mpg.
.
http://www.fuelly.com/motorcycle/honda/cbr500r
.

Last edited by sendler; 10-28-2018 at 08:32 AM..
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Old 10-28-2018, 07:58 PM   #25 (permalink)
EcoModding flying lizard
 
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Join Date: May 2012
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Cibbie - '88 Honda CBR 250R
Motorcycle
90 day: 58.82 mpg (US)

Rarity - '06 Honda Accord EX V6
Team Honda
90 day: 35.67 mpg (US)

Baby viff - '86 Honda VFR 400R
Motorcycle
90 day: 59.56 mpg (US)

Latios - '08 Suzuki SV650SF
Motorcycle
90 day: 68.87 mpg (US)
Thanks: 447
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sendler View Post
I rode a new version Interceptor 800 and was dissapointed. The gearing was too close and the final gearing was so long. And the engine will buck and refuse to pull below 4,000 rpm so that you were forced to clunk down into first when turning onto a different street. Very surprised at the engine bucking from the V4 engine which people romanticize about. A Ninja 650 is much more pleasant to commute on and will pull smoothly from 2,500.
Our VFR 800s would exhibit that behavior below 3000, but 4000? :/

Final gearing so long, as in too long? Mine would be at 4800 rpm at 70 mph. If I end up with that SV650 Iím going to gear it in such a way that it will be at 4150 rpm at 70.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sendler View Post
And the V4 throws off a ton of waste heat. It will cook you at a stop light on a hot day. Which is telling me that it will not be very fuel efficient.
Thatís why you shut it off at stops!
__________________
-Kaze o tatakaimasen-

Best trip in V6: 52.0
Best tank in V6: 46.0
Best tank in CBR: 61.3
Best tank in VFR: 62.5
Best tank in SV: 79.5

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroMPG View Post
You can lead a fashion-conscious horse to unusual-looking water...

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Old 10-29-2018, 06:17 AM   #26 (permalink)
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2001 Honda Insight stick - '01 Honda Insight manual
90 day: 60.68 mpg (US)

2009 Honda Fit auto - '09 Honda Fit Auto
90 day: 38.51 mpg (US)

PCX153 - '13 Honda PCX150
90 day: 104.48 mpg (US)

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Yes the gearing of the Interceptor 800 is too close and too long for around town. And the engine has very poor torque at low rpm. Second gear chugs when turning right through a green light so you then have to clunk down into first even though you are still going 20 mph. And then there is also the poor fuel mileage from all of the waste heat.
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:26 PM   #27 (permalink)
EcoModding flying lizard
 
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Join Date: May 2012
Location: Georgia
Posts: 628

Cibbie - '88 Honda CBR 250R
Motorcycle
90 day: 58.82 mpg (US)

Rarity - '06 Honda Accord EX V6
Team Honda
90 day: 35.67 mpg (US)

Baby viff - '86 Honda VFR 400R
Motorcycle
90 day: 59.56 mpg (US)

Latios - '08 Suzuki SV650SF
Motorcycle
90 day: 68.87 mpg (US)
Thanks: 447
Thanked 203 Times in 136 Posts
Sandwich oil heater acquired, this part is from the 2002-2007 Honda CB900. I got everything here for $18! It will probably need a new gasket, but looks like its gonna work otherwise.


Right after I ordered it, I went and looked at the clearance for the headers and thought it wasn't going to fit. However, the oil filter comes off the threads very quickly, and this heat exchanger is pretty thin. I test fit two random oil filters on it, and they both threaded in, so I have high hopes this thing will fit. I just have to figure out the coolant routing now.


Edit:

Doesn't work, the vfr's oil filter threads are cast into the engine, not removable. ALSO, the gasket area for the heat exchanger is too big, and would leak oil if I was able to attach it.

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__________________
-Kaze o tatakaimasen-

Best trip in V6: 52.0
Best tank in V6: 46.0
Best tank in CBR: 61.3
Best tank in VFR: 62.5
Best tank in SV: 79.5

Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroMPG View Post
You can lead a fashion-conscious horse to unusual-looking water...


Last edited by Daschicken; 12-04-2018 at 01:06 AM..
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