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Old 03-10-2010, 08:12 PM   #31 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowmover View Post
06 2500 4x4, 5.9l turbo diesel, 2.5" lift in front to level, 4 spd auto 3.73 gears, 325/55r22 tires, intake, exhaust, programmer.

Lose the lift, re-establish front/rear rake, lose the programmer, lose the CAI, never threaten transmission life.

What is the weight rating of those tires & wheels? I cannot believe that they are a suitable match for a truck with a 9,000-lb GVWR. Stock size in MICHELIN AT2 would be a better choice, IMO. If underrated then this tells me that the truck is just a toy, as commercial haulers, ranchers, farmers, tradesmen, contractors, etc all have IRS-deductible miles. A truck not so outfitted is incapable of doing work, thus, will not be eligible by use (another vehicle would have sufficed); in a manner of speaking.

Maybe freewheeling front hub conversion at some point. A bed cover or close-fit bed cap, and a front spoiler is a recommendation found in plenty of places, and a partial or full removeable grille block might help (I may actually try this one).
If I was in the cold north, then I'd get the MOPAR winter front.

I run the highways at 1,725/50 rpm (58/9 mph GPS corrected) for best mileage. It falls off quickly above 60. Dropping below this isn't worth that much (although yesterday, driving coastal Lousiana at dead-on 1600 rpm I was seeing 29 mpg [corrected] for over 100 miles with a 5-mph quartering stern wind).

Otherwise I can highway trip plan for 24-mpg empty or loaded, cold/rainy or hot/clear, traffic or no traffic, day or night. Having a manual and 2WD is the real key to economy. I've seen 25 to 27 on a number of fillups.

Running 5-mph slow in town (and only accelerating up to 5-mph below that) works well, as does running roughly 10-mph slow on the big road. Set the cruise control at the end of the entrance ramp; never change lanes, maintain perfect lane center (honor all ramp speeds posted); signal all changes well in advance; plan all stops for food/fuel/rest in advance (trip plan); maintain a steady state as long as the truck (not driver) is capable.

You work for the truck, it does not work for you is how I see it.

Just change fluids/filters ahead of schedule, keep tires at DODGE recommended numbers. Far too many CTD owners are going over 100k on both oem tires and brakes. Any less is sign of poor driving, IMO. Almost needless to say is that a garaged vehicle will outlast a covered or exposed one.

Personally, I would never be turning a diesel on/off on the road.

Nor would I ever add unproven aftermarket tuners, bypass filters or other junk that does not add to or reinforce the 350,000 mile MTBO of a CTD. Buying a $16,000 long block is no more on my list than is a set of $3000 injectors. No aftermarket "economy" item is proven when it comes to drivetrain longevity so avoid them/lose them. Stick with FLEETGUARD or DONALDSON filtration.

You'll have enough problems with premature wear on balljoints and u-joints on a 4WD. Personally, I'd look at eliminating steering deadness on-center, adding polyurethane bushings to the anti-roll bar (and adding a rear one) and going with BILSTEIN shocks if I just had to spend money.

All things considered a perfectly stock CTD will outlast (cost less) than any modded one. One cannot have it both ways.

Sounds to me like you already have a pretty good handle on driving for economy. Focus on long-term reliability (and replace components before they wear out) is third. (Safety is first, these things ain't easy to stop).

Lowest cost per mile is the key. See EDMUNDS True Cost of Ownership and read through all links/info. You MUST reduce your cpm (not just fuel useage).
Love the look ans stance of my truck with the leveling kit and tires/wheels so that will not change. Program is in the trucks computer and the only way to get rid of it is paying the dealer. Plus my bros truck gets better mileage with program vs without in same driving conditions so I'm hesatant to pay the dealer to get rid of mine. The CAI is a large BHAF on the factory intake piping and the wind deflector removed from the front so fresh air hits the filter. Tranny is not harmed if extra power is not used..... Tire rating is more than factory at 3085lbs each and wheels are also more. Factory tires/wheels with everything the same gave me less mpg...It was much harder to break into the 20mpg+ range. I am debating on going with a 285/55/22 next as the taller tire helps mpg in my case and the 285 width should help with frontal area, rolling resistance, ect... Just need some time to try some of the aero stuff.....

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Old 04-19-2010, 04:21 PM   #32 (permalink)
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Well, without the factory rake you're losing aero quality, and I'd like to see where taller tires are of benefit. The factory spoiler on mine is 10" from the ground, and a number of other brand trucks I have measured show no less than 7".

How about this, then: What is your average speed (E/T) for these tanks? I find that if I am averaging at least 27 mph then mpg is good (I'm currently at 38-mph). This leads me to wonder if

A] Departure and destination points/time are the same daily; and

B] If running OOR (out-of-route) might show some benefit; where, 10% or more miles farther on limited access roadways would keep E/T better and avoid one or more traffic stops. I wouldn't hesitate to run an additional 20 daily miles on the big road for several tanks. Standing starts are, as you know, real murder with an auto against 7,000-lbs which is made worse by taller tires. (Look at the OOR miles as a percentage of total [versus numerical] miles).

C] Prevailing winds: are they the same, daily? Do they shift during the day? Is a different route justified to take advantage? With the LEER topper on mine I have come to believe that a beneficial quartering or tail wind of 3-5 mph is necessary to "cancel" bad aero.

With all that in mind, if departure from home daily is scheduled, then the MOPAR block heater (see WIGIDIGIT quick connect from GENOS GARAGE) would help. As would the MOPAR winter front if you are running solo/empty. Two hours of heating all that coolant up a significant amount in temp would be worth the initial and long-term cost if set to a timer prior to departure.

As to "tuners" being beneficial, there are other men with trucks similar to mine (2003-2005) running the Gulf Coast and Southern Plains at 24-26 mpg and none of them are reporting that tuners increase steady-state mileage. Same with BHAF, fuel catalysts, tone ring mod, TORNADO, modified exhausts, etc., etc. Stock trucks on OEM tires at recommended pressures. These are men who also run IRS-deductible miles (business use) and keep records. Adding fuel pressure and modifying timing may make the trucks more responsive, but that is different than the end result of higher mpg. (On mine the response is flat through 2000-rpm, so I could see where a lesser driver would avoid "hanging the shift" with a "mileage" tuner; it was a bit irritating to get used to at first).

I do know that if mine were auto/4wd I'd be all over those front ball joints at 50,000 miles, as well as that worm-gear steering box. Eliminating steering play would be a VERY high priority. What kind of wear rate are you seeing on those tires every 10,000 miles?

Off-topic: I know ya'll think that BBQ is sheep or llama or something back there, but I am still kicking myself for being stuck two nights in Goldsboro a dozen years ago with nothing to do . . and only find out later that there is a GREAT BBQ house there!

Last edited by slowmover; 04-19-2010 at 04:27 PM..
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Old 04-19-2010, 04:52 PM   #33 (permalink)
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Here's some stuff I've collected elsewhere (as the OP has so well-titled this thread):


(.pdf 3.2 Mb) KENWORTH WHITE PAPER ON FUEL ECONOMY

http://www.loadtrek.net/loadtrek_net...whitepaper.pdf


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(ARTICLE) HEAVY DUTY TRUCKING

Hands-On Tips For Buying Fuel, Driving & Spec'ing For Better Economy


Tips For Drivers

Tips For Drivers

***** In a major study, The Technology and Maintenance Council of the ATA identified the major factors that most affect fuel economy. The top 10 are:
*****
1: Driver skills, then,

***** 2: Speed - especially with poor aerodynamics
***** 3: Cooling fan "on" time
***** 4: Electronic versus mechanical engines
***** 5: Using rib tires in every wheel position
***** 6: Cutting idling time
***** 7: Using single semi-trailers instead of doubles
***** 8: Using a roof fairing rather than a flat roof
***** 9: Using a roof fairing rather than a raised-roof sleeper
***** 10: Slowing down 5 mph

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I do have an FEA study done as part of a guy’s graduate thesis in engineering. It was of a pickup truck and he recommended an air dam and side skirts plus rear wheel well skirts with a sloped bed cover.

http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc...c=GetTRDoc.pdf

Powerstroke Nation - View Single Post - Who here gets higher MPG's and what is your secret?

I can always tell when I've made a good aero move. The truck gets quieter in terms of road noise and I can hear the engine better.

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As a rule, an increase in noise is a sign of increased drag that is reducing your aerodynamics.

It turns out the biggest gains are to be found on pickups — not by dropping the tailgate (a common misconception), but by installing a tonneau cover. "A tonneau cover improves the aerodynamics dramatically — on all pickup trucks," according to Ford's Wegryn. "In general, a tonneau cover can provide a drag reduction of 2 to 7 percent, depending on cab style, box length and overall vehicle Cd. Average fuel economy improvement ranges from 0.1 to 0.3 mpg." From an aero standpoint, it doesn't make a difference if you choose a soft or hard cover.

To improve Cd, designers may make the following changes:

• Round the edges of the front end
• Tune the grille and fascia openings
• Tune the wheel openings
• Place spats (small spoilers) in front of the tires to reduce turbulence
• Tune the size and shape of the outside mirrors and their attachment arms
• Reshape the water channel on the A-pillars
• Adjust the front fascia and air dam to reduce drag under the vehicle
• Add side skirts
• Tune the deck height, length and edge radius
• Install a rear spoiler
• Adjust the angle of the rear window
• Tuck up the exhaust system
• Use a diffuser to tune air coming off the underside
• Install "belly pans," underbody panels that cover components and smooth airflow

Improving Aerodynamics to Boost Fuel Economy



General Motors Co. will begin testing to determine whether closing the openings in the grille will have a significant impact on truck fuel economy. Movable slats would block the grille openings to improve aerodynamics. Temperature, humidity, vehicle speed and other sensors will determine when the electric motor should automatically open or close the slats.

Wind tunnel testing is planned over several weeks.

http://www.autonews.com/apps/pbcs.dl...EM06/302159901

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. . where the torque curve crosses the HP curve is the optimum speed for IC engine efficiency. In mine it is 1750 rpm or 59 mph (it's a diesel). In another experimentation process, I ran at 59 on the freeway for about 300 miles and got the mileage up to 26 . . at 65 mpg falls off to 22 and at 70 it falls to 18. 70 mph is way outside the peak torque curve and the induced drag bucket is getting huge.

DIY Electric Car Forums - View Single Post - Pickup truck Aerodynamics

Delivering 555 lb.-ft. of torque at 1,400 rpm and 305 horsepower at 2,900 rpm, the 2004 5.9-liter High Output Cummins Turbo Diesel . . . .


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Keep your pyrometer under 600°F and keep your boost pressure under 5 PSI when solo. Learn the combo for towing!

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TAG III

"I work for a manufacturer of industrial engines, turbochargers, reciprocating and centrifugal compressors. Our company's engineering standards for installation of our equipment require a minimum of 5 diameters of straight pipe ahead of a turbocharger inlet. Any less and a flow straightener (such as the TAG, turning vanes, etc.) must be used.

A dyno run where the engine\drivetrain is under constant loading, or towing over long distances, stationary engine service, marine service and such is where the difference would be most obvious, as stated above. Anywhere the engine is under constant loading and producing power in a relatively constant band."


Dodge Diesel - Diesel Truck Resource Forums


We have been getting good reports of mileage increases using the Turbo Air Guide III (TAG-III). Last week one of the techs at a Dodge dealer in our area did a dyno and emissions tests using the TAG-III in his personal truck. The dyno results showed little to no change in hp and torque even though the tech says he feels more power driving the truck. This is expected as dyno runs are full throttle excursions and are not indicative of the conditions while driving. The emissions test showed a dramatic reduction in emissions, (i.e. smoke, which is a good thing) and he reported a 2mpg increase in fuel mileage.


Dodge Diesel - Diesel Truck Resource Forums - View Single Post - Want fuel mileage increase, but not power

Most of the time what we see with the TAGs on the Dodge Cummins is 0-1mpg gains empty and generally 1-4mpg on trucks that are towing. It is possible to gain mileage with the TAGs. On my truck, I gained about .5mpg empty, but a solid 3mpg towing on multiple trips. Others have had better results than mine and some have had less results than I have. In Jeff's 2004/Auto we have seen very small mileage increases, but his truck is always driven empty and in town so it is difficult to see small increases, but he still won't take the TAG-III out because of how it makes the truck run.

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AEROCAPS HOME - A Project to improve the Aerodynamics of a Pickup using an Aerodynamic CAP


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(In regards big trucks (Class 8); extrapolate:

The #1 factor in getting better fuel mileage is to REDUCE HORSEPOWER DEMAND. This is a combination of vehicle configuration, condition, load and DRIVER OPERATION.

The #2 factor in getting better fuel mileage is to AVOID RUNNING THE ENGINE WHEN YOU ARE NOT MOVING.

The #3 factor in getting better fuel mileage is the engine.

Everyone wants to look at the engine first , because they think the part that burns the fuel is the most responsible for fuel economy. I'll discuss this first and then get to the other issues.

Most modern on-highway diesel are capable of BSFC's in the low .300's or better (high .200's) at cruise rpm. This is pretty damn lean compared to earlier engines and I haven't seen any after-market accessories offer an improvement.

So, as far as the engine, you just need to make sure the engine is mechanically/electronically correct to start.

Check air and fuel filters.

Inspect air intake and exhaust systems. Look for leaks in the after-cooler piping, after-cooler core etc... Best way is to plug at each end of after cooler piping and pressurize entire assy to test for leaks.

Check exhaust for blown manifold and turbo gaskets. look at manifold and turbo hot housing for signs of overheating. A visual of the cold side is helpful, looking for damaged fins, rubbing etc...

If mechanical engine, check timing. Also check linkage to pump. Check fuel settings if seals or broken, Check air air/fuel ratio controls, (aneroid, puff limiter etc..)

If electronic, check for fault codes and possibly do a timing and sensor calibration.

Check fuel pressure.

Make sure engine is up to operating temp. Usually 190°

Check fuel quality: Fuel should be 35 API at 60°. Thinner winter blend will reduce fuel mileage considerably.

Fuel heaters: should be thermostatically controlled. Off in summer and only on when needed in the winter.

Oil: use 10w30 in all but the hottest weather. If you are running 15w40 in the winter it's hurting fuel mileage. You will see 4-5psi lower oil pressure, but it won't hurt anything.

Clutch fan: must cycle on and off. Fans require 15-18hp to run.

BLACK SMOKE: There should be no black smoke when changing gears or accelerating. Black smoke means the engine / fuel system is out of tune and adjustment for fuel economy. BLACK SMOKE is MONEY going out the exhaust pipe.

VEHICLE: many considerations here. Start with tires. make sure they are properly inflated (wish i had $$$ for every tractor that showed up for a dyno that had low tire pressure)

Tread design: rib is better than on/off road and heavy lug tread is terrible, run rib tires when possible. Low profile has much lower rolling resistance too.

Drive line: check drive-shafts for misalignments and vibrations. Rears must track straight, worn misaligned rear suspensions can cost you. An eyeball along the edge of the rears to the front can give you a quick check here. Use fuel saving synthetics in trans and differentials.

Vehicle aerodynamics / configuration: This varies greatly with different type of power units and trailers. The best possible is a Cab-over-engine (COE) with roof fairing, side fairings and very few protruding accessories, pulling a smooth side van trailer. Everything having ribbed low pro tires

The worst is a big conventional with no fairings, big external air cleaners , big mirrors, horns, fuel tanks, visors, no fairing, pulling a flatbed with a big bulky load, with lugged tall tires.

HORSEPOWER DEMAND: The horsepower that is needed to maintain a certain speed. i.e. how much horse power needed to overcome wind and rolling resistance, determines the fuel you will burn to cruise down the highway. This is called HORSEPOWER DEMAND. It also determines how much RESERVE HORSEPOWER is available for pulling hills and passing other trucks etc...

EXAMPLE: If two trucks have 400hp and truck #1 requires 160hp to maintain 60 mph and truck #2 requires 220 hp to maintain 60 mph, truck #1 will of course have better fuel economy AND have 60 more RESERVE HORSEPOWER to pull hills.

So aerodynamics play a huge role in fuel economy, particularly at speeds above 55-MPH (55 wasn't a arbitrary number when it was the federal speed limit)

Above 55-MPH "AERODYNAMIC HORSEPOWER DEMAND INCREASES BY THE CUBE OF SPEED INCREASE".

How this plays out is a truck that can achieve 7 MPG at 55 MPH, will get 6 MPG at 65 MPH and only 5MPG at 70MPH

Aerodynamic considerations include having a roof fairing that matches the height of the trailer. The trailer should be as close to the tractor as possible. Ideal distance is 15-18 inches, never more than 24 inches. Side fairings help close this gap without the trailer being to close for sharp turns.

At distances over 24" inches between the trailer and the tractor, drag goes up considerable. by 48" you have the drag of TWO FULL FRONTAL AREAS. Might as well have the trailer beside the truck! So much for the stretched out "west coast" look.

It can be tough to improve an existing tractors aerodynamics, but you can add a roof fairing and side fairings. Avoid putting on a lot of bulky accessories like visors, bigger mirrors, dual external air cleaner, huge bumpers, horns, flaps hanging everywhere, etc... Remember, driving an un-aerodynamic rig fast, will hurt fuel mileage even more.

DRIVER OPERATION: This is the big one that no one wants to face up to. However there is a BRAND NEW PICK-UP TRUCKS WORTH OF FUEL SAVING$ PER YEAR AVAILABLE (to those that operate well VS those that don't)

#1 Cruise speed: I just went over aerodynamics and horsepower demand. More time at lower speed will save you big on fuel.

#2 Cruise RPM: most modern trucks will operate efficiently in the 1400-1600 rpm range depending on model of engine. Cruise at this rpm (in the lower range of it if possible) Do not gear down a step to run at 1800rpm or higher

USE CRUISE CONTROL, many electronic engines alter timing maps in cruise control for better steady-state economy

3# PULLING HILLS: Diesel have a fuel curve inverse to the torque curve. (on some electronic engines this flattens out)

A typical 400 hp engine may burn 18 gallons per hour (GPH) at 1800 RPM, But only 14 GPH at 1200 RPM. Meanwhile it has MUCH MORE TORQUE AT 1200 rpm.

What does this mean? You generally pull hills at max fuel. You want to pull hills in the highest gear you can and keep the engine at peak torque/ lower GPH.

A big mistake is to drop a gear and run at the hill at higher rpm where the engine uses more fuel and has less torque. This is a fuel wasting downward spiral were you have to make successive gear changes burning more fuel and going slower and slower.

Stay in the highest gear as long as possible in hills, if you can crest the hill at or above 1000rpm, it's usually o.k. to do so.
Think about the savings in hilly terrain, hill after hill BURNING 14GPH vs 18GPH to get the job done. Add that you are usually pulling at a higher speed with correct method so you spend less time at max fuel consumption.

#4 GEAR CHANGES: Shift progressively, use only enough RPM to get into the next gear. Taching out every gear is a waste of fuel, especially in city driving

#5 COOL DOWN: Use exit ramps and truck stop access roads to cool your engine down before shutting it off. If you can coast in to a stop using very little fuel and keeping the exhaust temp down, there is no need to let the truck idle several minutes before shutting it off. Idling is a big waste if fuel and five minutes has a way of turning into twenty-five.

#6 IDLE TIME : THE BIGGEST WASTE OF FUEL OF ALL. Any time that engine is running and the truck isn't moving hurts tank mileage and your wallet. It is also unnecessary engine wear. Shut the truck off whenever you can. Cool engine down as outlined above. Consider alternate heat/cooling options for over the road trucks. These are best installed when the truck is new for maximum payback.
An electric blanket or good sleeping bag can get you a few more comfortable hours in sleeper without having the truck running.

#7 DRIVE SLOWER (did I say that yet?)

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Comment by dieselralph
2008-03-25 13:40:53

I work for an engine maker. I work with a lot of fleets to get them to spec trucks with our engines. Here is a tip sheet you should consider and aerodynamics play an important part the faster you go. (difference between a square nose and an aero truck can be up to 15% improvement in fuel economy!)

The one thing I see over and over is gearing problems. Many times diferences in one truck vs another is one is geared for power and one for fuel efficiency. Never spec one engine the same as another. Use the engine manufacturers gearing recommendations. A C-15 uses different gears than a Series 60 than an ISX. You gear a Cat like a Cummins and it will get horrible fuel economy. Gear a Cummins like a Cat and the drivers will complain about power. Each has its sweet spot. Also, if you buy a used truck, keep in mind the speed the original owner drove at. You buy a 379 and more than likely the owner let it run over 72 mph. Don’t expect to drive it at 55 and feel all the power. They probably geared it tall for the high speed and sacrificed drivability at 55 in top gear. Also, stay in top gear 90% of the time and use cruise 70% or more. Cruise is alway .2-.4 mpg better than pedaling on long trips.

Rock-Solid Rules

§ Every 2% reduction in aerodynamic drag results in approximately 1% improvement in fuel economy.

§ Above 55 mph, each 1 mph increase in vehicle speed decreases fuel economy by 0.1 mpg. (Drive 65 vs 75 and save 1 mpg regardless of the truck you drive. Thats about $10,000 a year if you drive 100,000 miles)

§ Worn tires provide better fuel economy than new tires, up to 7% better fuel economy.(Brand new vs. end of life)

§ Used lug drive tires can get up to 0.4 mpg better than new lug tires. (used means broken in)

§ Ribbed tires on the drive axles provide 2–4% better fuel economy than lugged tires. (new vs new)

§ Every 10 psi that a tire is underinflated reduces fuel economy by 1%.

§ The break-in period for tires is between 35,000 and 50,000 miles.

§ Tires make biggest difference in mpg below around 50 mph; aerodynamics is the most important factor over around 50 mph.

§ The most efficient drivers get about 30% better fuel economy than the least efficient drivers.

§ Idle time is costly. Every hour of idle time in a long-haul operation can decrease fuel efficiency by 1%.


--------------------------------


TIRES



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(Article) OVERDRIVE Magazine 12/2008

"Matching Tire Pressure to Load" (John Baxter)

The tire’s contact patch should be as large as possible while keeping a healthy amount of pressure and maintaining even contact between all the areas of the patch and the road. That means adjustment to reach “the optimal pressure for the load,” rather than inflating the tire to the same cold pressure all the time, says Doug Jones, customer engineering support manager at Michelin North America.

Matching pressure to load | Overdrive - Owner Operators Trucking Magazine

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(Article) BULK TRANSPORTER NEWS 9/2008

"Five tips to control your tire costs and improve vehicle performance, safety

With tires ranked as the second highest operating cost after fuel, a solid tire maintenance program can help reap solid dividends. Knowing the proper inflation level for your truck tires is crucial. TMC Recommended Practice (RP) 235 states the following determines the correct air pressure for a given load:

• Tire size and load rating
• Weight carried on each axle
• Number of tires on each axle
• Maximum speed the vehicle travels during its operation

Five tips to control your tire costs and improve vehicle | With tires ranked as the second highest operating cost after fuel, a solid tire maintenance program can help reap solid dividends | Sept 2008

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(Website) Barry's Tire Tech

. . I hope you noticed how flat the wear index is for the radial tire. I interpret this to mean that conducting a "chalk test" is not a good way to determine what the best pressure is for wear.


Barry's Tire Tech


(One of the screwups in the Ford Explorer/Firestone fiasco was that the tire pressure spec'd by Ford left no reserve. 20% is recommended.)


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(.pdf) FIRESTONE MEDIUM & LIGHT TRUCK DATA BOOK

(see pages 52 for truck fuel economy discussion; and page 64 (+/-) for load /pressure tables.) (Go to the man'f'r of your tires, download and copy).

http://www.trucktires.com/firestone/...ckDataBook.pdf

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Old 05-24-2010, 10:36 AM   #34 (permalink)
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just had to replace a stop solenoid and a clutch mounting. probably due to EOC'ing. the engine wouldn't stop even when i took the key out!
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Nissan Leaf 24kwh. Average FE = 300mpg 3.6miles/kwh (@plug)
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Old 05-27-2010, 01:53 AM   #35 (permalink)
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Slowmover: Do you think my numbers are good considering my setup? I'm only 1-1.5mpg less than your lifetime mpg numbers. Not shure of the terrain you drive but my commuting is through rolling hills in the piedmont of NC. I will be playing around with different power settings to see if I can gain any mpg numbers. I may start limiting my power with the Smarty POD to lessen fuel consumption during accel and pulling grades.....Also started using water injection.....Oh...An aero bed cap is in the works too!
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Old 10-04-2010, 11:12 AM   #36 (permalink)
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As with #3, my Cummins would take an hour to warm up by idle in the cold. I just wait till it stops cycling the heater or glow plugs & take it easy.

What's a injector cleaning kit? I just add Power Service, 1 once to three gallons of fuel I believe. It's also great for the older vehicles that are supposed to be run on LSD instead of the ULSD. It supplies the lubricant to the FP & the injectors. Just use something to help out. It really makes my Dodge start as soon as I touch the key.

Diesels are great & really are the way to go if one has a bit of a commute in their daily driving or need a real workhorse.
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Old 10-04-2010, 12:03 PM   #37 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nubbzcummins View Post
Slowmover: Do you think my numbers are good considering my setup? I'm only 1-1.5mpg less than your lifetime mpg numbers. Not shure of the terrain you drive but my commuting is through rolling hills in the piedmont of NC. I will be playing around with different power settings to see if I can gain any mpg numbers. I may start limiting my power with the Smarty POD to lessen fuel consumption during accel and pulling grades.....Also started using water injection.....Oh...An aero bed cap is in the works too!
What are you using for a Lift Pump. You may have a CP3 becuse you have a common rail, that w/ a manual trans would be the way to go. I do have an auto w/ the vp44.

Are you using a Scan Gauge ii? ood luck & continued success w/ your CTD!

Dave
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Old 10-04-2010, 11:44 PM   #38 (permalink)
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2004 CTD - '04 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nubbzcummins View Post
Slowmover: Do you think my numbers are good considering my setup? I'm only 1-1.5mpg less than your lifetime mpg numbers. Not shure of the terrain you drive but my commuting is through rolling hills in the piedmont of NC.

I will be playing around with different power settings to see if I can gain any mpg numbers. I may start limiting my power with the Smarty POD to lessen fuel consumption during accel and pulling grades.....Also started using water injection.....Oh...An aero bed cap is in the works too!


I'm embarrassed to say I didn't read this until today. Yeah, I think of your numbers all the time in reading CTD sites and see comparable rigs to yours nowhere close. I'm also impressed how close you are to mine . . but don't forget that I just drive for economy, I don't ever "hypermile" if it means the truck is out of gear (except for the last few feet to a stop); nor do I do anything any different than I have done for years. Once I'm on the highway the cruise control is on. I just happen to run at an economical speed and let the TQ do it's thing. Terrain would have to be quite hilly for me to run otherwise (I have been running sea level Gulf Coast Texas where the freeway overpass is the "hill"). Etc. So it could be you are doing things I am not.

Either way I think you are doing a better job than me on mpg as I see it. My economy goal is longest life at lowest cost. I'm more interested in a steady pace than accounting for mpg details. Really, I just have a very good truck; truck and driver are well-matched. The driver can go through too many unaccounted variables day in and day out so I'm really, really interested in replicating yesterday again today in re performance . . . I have a loose set of tolerances, probably, compared to some around here.

What I want to see is the same set of numbers repeated for the truck at 50k, at 150k, at 250k and at 350k, if that makes sense. Cents-per-mile of operation. I don't expect to buy a second set of replacement tires until 250k, nor do I expect the second brake reline until past 200k. I worry about injector cost and turbocharger replacement. Coolant leaks. The usual high dollar diesel potential repair costs . . which is why I bought a Cummins.

Frankly, I've been waiting for a smart-ass comment on one of those CTD boards about my mileage AND being 2WD as I've intended to slap 'em with "Piedmont" and "4WD" for some time with your numbers. Just hasn't come up yet.

.
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Dave's Civic Duty (10-05-2010)
Old 10-05-2010, 10:15 AM   #39 (permalink)
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chuckhumprey: On my gasser car, my best fuel mileage tank (70 mpg) was achieved by accelerating at 75% throttle and shifting at the idiot lights. Common knowledge umongst hypermilers is to keep acceleration just below open loop. Something about BSFC, electronic fuel injection, open/closed loop blah blah blah. 1 psi increase in tire pressure doesn't cut it. Warming the engine up is a total waste of fuel - but a block heater in a gasser is just so-so. A lot of those old-thinking carburated gasser tips don't apply. But you got lucky on the avoid jackrabbit starts with a diesel.

"Keep your pyrometer under 600°F and keep your boost pressure under 5 PSI when solo. Learn the combo for towing!" is a great tip. LRR tires (and tires pressed up to sidewall or higher) and aero mods should top the list. Up to the driver for the rest.

Very slow acceleration (target driving) up to speed seemed to net the best results in my diesel. Although not really practical in everyday driving I did a proof of concept 3 mile run, stop sign to stop sign, level no wind and achieved 42.3 mpg. Most of the acceleration was done with just the engine at idle and maybe slight throttle as needed for a descent shift into 6th, ending with a top speed of 40 mph with accelerater help. With more room, probably could have gotten up to the target speed of 45 to 48 and maintained a pretty descent mileage in the low/mid 30's through target driving and right foot control. So the potential is there if the driver wants it bad enough.

Thanks for the big rig/pickup tips slowmover from back in April.

my 2 cents
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Old 10-05-2010, 01:09 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Slowmover, I like your CTD Ideology. Your truck is fortunte to have you as it's owner. It should last a very long time & you live in Texas? Two life times at least.

Do you use a by-pass oil filter of any kind? I picked up a used one on ebay for a good price. Are you on the Mopar Man 1973 site? One of my favorites, he's on all the Dodge Cummins pages checkin' things out too.

Doin' fine w/ a 5.9,
Dave

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