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Old 02-14-2008, 12:41 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Oh it's the Fairmont-based wagon -- much lighter than I thought. Great condition too! Good mileage potential.

I once owned a '79 Fairmont for a day.

4-cyl, 4-speed, Coupe. The rear suspension mount rusted through and it was about ready to give loose completely. Someone at school was selling it for $50, so I took the deal.

Planned it as a project, but it proved too rusted-out to salvage. Junked it for $75. The engine/transmission was still strong, but too much work to get it drivable back home.

Keep warm up there!

RH77

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Old 02-14-2008, 01:00 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RH77 View Post
Oh it's the Fairmont-based wagon -- much lighter than I thought. Great condition too! Good mileage potential.

I once owned a '79 Fairmont for a day.

4-cyl, 4-speed, Coupe. The rear suspension mount rusted through and it was about ready to give loose completely. Someone at school was selling it for $50, so I took the deal.

Planned it as a project, but it proved too rusted-out to salvage. Junked it for $75. The engine/transmission was still strong, but too much work to get it drivable back home.

Keep warm up there!

RH77
I spend most of my time derusting and undercoating all over. Very pleasantly surprised to discover that the mexican-built cars with AC also get extra factory undercoating. It was like new UNDER the floor (exterior) and inside!

I checked on the Ford Ranger History and they produced a diesel version of the same 2.3L V-4 up until 1996. I kept the V8/V4 crossmember for an eventual upgrade. The 1996 engine produced more HP and more Torque with a factory FE of 28 MPG. That's easy to improve on.
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Old 04-14-2008, 04:08 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by H4MM3R View Post
Welcome to the community.
Thanks, I'll be coming back more frequently after I finish reassembling it. We're finally out of the cold, but the snow is still melting and the deep frost makes it almost too muddy to work on it. Another couple of weeks. It's been really tough without a vehicle since November, 2006. So it will be a pleasant change. Lots of reno work went on hold.
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Old 06-16-2008, 01:19 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Still reassembling, guys. I'm looking hard at building in better MPG methods:

If gasoline engines are not much more than 50% efficiency, then I want to dig deeper into what it takes to get mine to that level at least. Once I get that or better, I'll go slow, starting with an Advance Timing Curve Kit from Mr. Gasket to get peak torque and RPMs in the common ranges that the engine needs. That should give me a 10% boost in HP, maybe 15% in torque, and possibly 20% in MPG improvement.

Next will be straight water injection - maybe needing another tweak to the Timing Curve, and a bit more efficiency - 8%? or more.

Then I'll look at a Hydrogen booster building project.

That's my plan anyway.
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Old 06-19-2008, 09:51 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Your car is a neat project. I think it's fascinating watching an old, conventional restoration. That engine bay is cavernous!

I believe gas engines are only ~30% efficient. Turbo-compounded diesels have reached ~46%, but they are about the most efficient of internal combustion engines.

I'm not too familiar with older engines, but I think your % gains seem a little optimistic. Your biggest gain from modifying the engine would probably come from increasing the CR, as I bet it is really low (6.5:1?). I've only seen water injection applied to heavily boosted/high CR engines (e.g. WWII aircraft), but I suppose it might work alongside advanced timing.

The hydrogen generator will probably be a waste of time. I've never seen one work and I can only conceive of it helping raise a fuel's octane number. I think you'll see the biggest gains by modifying driving style and sticking to more conventional tactics first.

I look forward to seeing the rest of the restoration.

- LostCause
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Old 06-19-2008, 10:32 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LostCause View Post
Your car is a neat project. I think it's fascinating watching an old, conventional restoration. That engine bay is cavernous!

I believe gas engines are only ~30% efficient. Turbo-compounded diesels have reached ~46%, but they are about the most efficient of internal combustion engines.

I'm not too familiar with older engines, but I think your % gains seem a little optimistic. Your biggest gain from modifying the engine would probably come from increasing the CR, as I bet it is really low (6.5:1?). I've only seen water injection applied to heavily boosted/high CR engines (e.g. WWII aircraft), but I suppose it might work alongside advanced timing.

The hydrogen generator will probably be a waste of time. I've never seen one work and I can only conceive of it helping raise a fuel's octane number. I think you'll see the biggest gains by modifying driving style and sticking to more conventional tactics first.

I look forward to seeing the rest of the restoration.

- LostCause

It is a low compression at 8.4:1 (Factory Specs). Here's where I'm starting with a water injection system:

http://journeytoforever.org/biofuel_...earth/me3.html

Here's how I'll get the engine a bit more efficient :
http://www.classicinlines.com/AlumOverview.asp

And!!!! Since I've done this before on a 1975 Chrysler Town & Country 440 CID with great results, I'm thinking of doing a fuel vapouriser like this one:
Yep, that's my car. We bought this Farimont Squire, while we lived in Guadalajara, until we moved back to Canada.
http://jabi.com/store/jbp-1729m.html

Or the Carl Cella system like this:
I've heard that he's way too optimistic about his results. Who cares about MPG, if the fuel is free?
http://www.hasslberger.com/tecno/hydrogen.html

And I've got another idea to collect the humidity from the air (turbo-charger or air pump), condense it to water state, electrolyse it and then run it into the fuel system. That way I won't carry any water (which freezes in -40F) or Hydrogen gas cells that could send me to the here-after, before my time.

Like you said, its cavernous under the hood. Lots of experiment room and mostly on the side without exhaust manifolds or heater hoses.


If I don't try, I'll kick my own butt. If I succeed, I'll kick the OilCo's butt.
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Old 06-19-2008, 11:01 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LostCause View Post
Your car is a neat project. I think it's fascinating watching an old, conventional restoration. That engine bay is cavernous!

I believe gas engines are only ~30% efficient. Turbo-compounded diesels have reached ~46%, but they are about the most efficient of internal combustion engines.

I'm not too familiar with older engines, but I think your % gains seem a little optimistic. Your biggest gain from modifying the engine would probably come from increasing the CR, as I bet it is really low (6.5:1?). I've only seen water injection applied to heavily boosted/high CR engines (e.g. WWII aircraft), but I suppose it might work alongside advanced timing.

The hydrogen generator will probably be a waste of time. I've never seen one work and I can only conceive of it helping raise a fuel's octane number. I think you'll see the biggest gains by modifying driving style and sticking to more conventional tactics first.

I look forward to seeing the rest of the restoration.

- LostCause
Oops, forgot the first change (It'll pay for the others. ):

Mr. Gasket makes a variety of Advance Timing curve spring kits for Ford and GM engines, and my little six. Saves from 5 to 15% on fuel, a bit more HP and more torque at the more common City/Hwy speeds. For $10? It's a no-brainer:

http://www.mr-gasket.com/ProductsLis...minselection=3

How-to:
http://www.carbdford.com/viewtopic.p...ed077c35804eab

Here's some Ford Six info on results - It became a Sticky/Tech Article:
http://fordsix.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=21002

Better written FordSix comment on the Advance Curve Kit:
http://fordsix.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=30894

Tough little beasts with 7 main bearings - like a Duracell bunny.

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