Go Back   EcoModder Forum > EcoModding > DIY / How-to
Register Now
 Register Now
 

Reply  Post New Thread
 
Submit Tools LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-24-2011, 09:19 AM   #21 (permalink)
EcoModding Apprentice
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Houston
Posts: 228
Thanks: 0
Thanked 23 Times in 17 Posts
Kind of interesting - use a windshield washer pump, or something like that? Puts out quite a good flow of water.

  Reply With Quote
Alt Today
Popular topics

Other popular topics in this forum...

   
Old 05-28-2011, 01:36 PM   #22 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Posts: 45
Thanks: 59
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertSmalls View Post
It might be helpful in a few situations, but:

*a variable grille block would be simpler, lighter, and more effective. It's the holy grail of grille blocks, and I think a simple, universal, easily duplicated automatic variable grille block should be our focus.
*you'd need a large, heavy reservoir for continuous operation of a water sprayer
*if you really need cooling in a hurry, the small amount of heat an ecomodder's engine produces can be easily dissipated by the heater core
*dropping a few mph is usually adequate to bring me back to nice and cool operation
A racer on another forum said they had variable grille blocks, but didn't offer many details. Do you have any ideas on where to buy or how to build one? Here in Florida, I definitely couldn't do a full-time radiator block of any appreciable size.
  Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2011, 01:39 PM   #23 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Posts: 45
Thanks: 59
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Oh, and if you want to make a radiator water sprayer--whether the idea is practical or not--you probably can't do much better than the autospeed intercooler sprayer--search their site for "World's Best Intercooler Water Spray"
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2011, 05:26 PM   #24 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
GrapeApe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 5
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via AIM to GrapeApe Send a message via MSN to GrapeApe
i'm a cheep ba5+ard & i'm unemployed at the moment. so i can not afford the systems on the market. i fashioned a spray system from a chrome water fire extinguisher i had, and 4 of nozzles from a patio mister set up & a few fittings & hoses from a box store. just 10 psi and it starts to mist. it works best at 40 psi so i only full the tank to 50psi. i used an old lawn mower throttle cable to pull on the squeeze valve. i can then cool my truck pulling the hills outside of los angeles. This is on my 64 Chevy pu with the old inline six. the temp rises just a tad over my comfort range when pulling my trailers. i pull the Castaic grade in second gear and that slows the speed so i'm not getting very much air through the grill.

the system works to my satisfaction and brings the gauge down to just over level driving range. remember, the factory gages have no numbers, just a cold; hot; and a "normal range" painted line... C |______| H so i'm just eyeballing it
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2011, 06:35 PM   #25 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,442

2004 CTD - '04 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT
Team Cummins
90 day: 19.36 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,422
Thanked 732 Times in 553 Posts
There was a similar item sold through the late 1980's (prior to the advent of FI) where the radiator temps would spike on hill-climbs for tow vehicles [RV's]. Severe heat spike. It used a windshield washer pump, that reservoir made common (and/or enlarged) and distilled water recommended (for reasons above: corrosion and mineral build). IIRC it was four spray heads mounted so as to cover the entirety of the first heat exchanger (generally the A/C condenser).

By report this worked best -- the temporary increase in surface area -- in dry, hot, higher altitude climbs.

.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-24-2011, 06:36 PM   #26 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurcher
 
mort's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 309
Thanks: 140
Thanked 96 Times in 69 Posts
Hi GrapeApe,
Excellent, how much water do you use per trip?
-mort
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 05:38 PM   #27 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: arkansas, little rock
Posts: 75
Thanks: 5
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
yea it would be nice to live in a place where i could do some kind of grill block, here in central arkansas we push into the 100-110 range. any kind of block in the front will instantly lead to a rising temp gauge. im still trying to figure out if i cover the front of the car under the engine if it will affect cooling. air is coming in it has to go somewhere there will have to be an outlet. this belongs in a different thread so im gonna shut up now.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 09:44 PM   #28 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Hubert Farnsworth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 70

Planet Express Ship - '94 Geo Prizm LSI
90 day: 36.57 mpg (US)
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 3 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowmover View Post
There was a similar item sold through the late 1980's (prior to the advent of FI) where the radiator temps would spike on hill-climbs for tow vehicles [RV's]. Severe heat spike. It used a windshield washer pump, that reservoir made common (and/or enlarged) and distilled water recommended (for reasons above: corrosion and mineral build). IIRC it was four spray heads mounted so as to cover the entirety of the first heat exchanger (generally the A/C condenser).

By report this worked best -- the temporary increase in surface area -- in dry, hot, higher altitude climbs.

.
You mean prior to the return to forced induction. There had been supercharged road cars dating back to at least the 1920s, and turbocharging first was utilized in mass production in the early 60s at General Motors, ex the Corvair Monza flat six turbo, and the turbocharged version of the Buick 3500 V8 as installed in the Oldsmobile Cutlass Jetfire variant of the Buick Special/ GM Y-body in 1962
__________________
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 01:59 PM   #29 (permalink)
EcoModding Lurker
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: CA & OR
Posts: 35

Hexd - '93 Honda DX Hatchback
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 3 Posts
The variable grille block to which you're referring is called a shutterstat~ been used on bigrigs for quite some time. This combined with extra thermostatically controlled fans is the best option, BUT is designed for HUGE cooling systems. As previously stated to hose the rad core you'd have to carry so much waterweight that it is impractical. If emergency cooling is in order enough to warrant such concern, then modifying driving conditions and increasing cooling capacity is in order.

At the risk of getting flamed, you're overthinking this. The reason newer cars run so hot's because they're designed to~ it increases the thermal efficiency of the motor. Every pound of pressure held by that fancy rad cap increases the boil point 3 degrees, raising the overall to 240-270 degrees running temps. If modifying driving conditions isn't in the plan, go for as big a radiator as you can fit, add thermo-fans set at different temps, and then MAYBE add that shutterstat if you can add enough capacity to the system.
  Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2011, 03:00 PM   #30 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 2,442

2004 CTD - '04 DODGE RAM 2500 SLT
Team Cummins
90 day: 19.36 mpg (US)
Thanks: 1,422
Thanked 732 Times in 553 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hubert Farnsworth View Post
You mean prior to the return to forced induction. There had been supercharged road cars dating back to at least the 1920s, and turbocharging first was utilized in mass production in the early 60s at General Motors, ex the Corvair Monza flat six turbo, and the turbocharged version of the Buick 3500 V8 as installed in the Oldsmobile Cutlass Jetfire variant of the Buick Special/ GM Y-body in 1962
No, sorry, I meant Fuel Injection, or, more carefully, digital engine controls. It became much harder for a car to go "out of tune" on top of problems with towing and altitude changes that made carburetors hard put.

  Reply With Quote
Reply  Post New Thread


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DIY: OEM VX PCV and Info TomO DIY / How-to 4 04-02-2011 09:38 AM
AC vs DC for DIY MazdaMatt Fossil Fuel Free 15 03-06-2009 09:33 AM
Three Dirt Cheap DIY Electric Cars - Part 4 SVOboy EcoModder Blog Discussion 3 12-12-2008 08:14 PM
Three Dirt Cheap DIY Electric Cars - Part 5 SVOboy EcoModder Blog Discussion 0 12-12-2008 04:10 PM
Three Dirt Cheap DIY Electric Cars - Part 3 SVOboy EcoModder Blog Discussion 0 12-05-2008 10:30 PM



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.5.2
All content copyright EcoModder.com