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Old 09-02-2012, 12:30 PM   #11 (permalink)
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It is sounding more and more like a wheel bearing. They change sound with rpm changes or when the brake is applied or going threw corners. My last bad bearing remained snug when checking, but was noisy.
Half shafts get noisy too, usually the worn part has play or binds making a clicking sound,you have to physically check for binding or play. Jack it up put in gear and spin the tire, by the shaft if possible if not put it in neutral and spin the half shaft.
If corners and braking do not effect the sound then its probably not the bearings, if it doesn't happen during acceleration then its probably not the half shafts. Leaving sticky brakes.

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Old 09-03-2012, 05:37 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Half-axles

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecomodded View Post
If corners and braking do not effect the sound then its probably not the bearings, if it doesn't happen during acceleration then its probably not the half shafts. Leaving sticky brakes.
Re-tested today with these specific ideas in mind. @ ecomodded: cornering and braking change the sound so little as to be insignificant and the sound carries right through acceleration without change except that it speeds up with the wheels, unaffected by RPMs.

It's all about the turning of the front wheels/hubs/axles. All the back ever does is rub a little sometimes while braking, especially if they're still cold. So I took the front wheels off again.

@ Old Mech: there is no ridgeline on the disc, unless the rust on the side edge and the inner hub area counts. But I don't think those areas make any contact with the pads. The shinny contact surface is without ridges or uneven wear.

Hand cranking the front hubs, with no wheels on them, produces the grinding noise. Sounds like bearings. The noise seems strongest on the driver's side, near where the half-axle connects to the transmission housing. But I have tentatively ruled-out the transmission because the sound does not occur at idle and does not vary with RPM. It seems to be only about the rolling of the front wheels/hubs/axles.

I still have to do the more complete brake inspections you describe, Old Mech. Short on time for today.
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:04 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Just a casual update on my progress: After some delay to collect tools and read the shop manual, I was ready for the rear drum inspection today. In short, rear hub bearings are fine. Could not check drums for warp (200mm vernier calipers are too expensive). Rear pads are worn slightly unevenly but within spec. Some glazing, and some pretty superficial cracking. When I reset the auto adjuster thing, the rubbing sound when I spun the wheel went away. But it came back as soon as I test drove and used the brakes. I had an experienced neighbor drop by and peak at my work. He thought the wear not significant enough to justify replacement for a while. I'll watch them but leave the rears alone for now. Next two Sundays will will be diagnosing front wheel hub bearing units, rotors, and pads (and replacing whatever needed).
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:24 AM   #14 (permalink)
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not much of a chore to change the front drive shafts. my son and i have done it on all of his rice burners (honda's) the cost is reasonable both sides should take about 4 hrs or less.
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Old 11-03-2012, 11:15 PM   #15 (permalink)
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still seeking source of rubbing sounds

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Originally Posted by ron View Post
not much of a chore to change the front drive shafts. my son and i have done it on all of his rice burners (honda's) the cost is reasonable both sides should take about 4 hrs or less.
I might end up changing the half-axles, but I've been told it is much more difficult than you describe, that the axles need to be installed precisely or damage can be done. Any special tools you've used?

Today, I replaced the front brake pads, on recommendation that they were worn and could stand replacement. Pad wear was normal, with no indication of warped rotors that might be making the sounds described in the OP. So it was on to testing the car further...

With the front end on jack stands, I ran the engine up to 30mph in second and then put it into neutral and cut the engine with my kill switch. The passenger side front wheel stopped really quickly, well before the driver side wheel. Since the slowing was uneven, I suppose the rubbing is not from the transmission. I'm thinking again that it's either the half-axles or the CV joint. The cv joint boots by the hubs are dried out a little and have a little cracking. One or both sides has leaked a little bead of clear grease. Because they need to be replaced anyway, that will be my next step. And maybe it'll eliminate the sound too.
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Old 11-04-2012, 02:32 PM   #16 (permalink)
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I reread this thread but not sure what you talk about.

Rear wheel need drum shoe adjust to apply little light enough to slow wheel when spin.

Front wheels you say passenger side stop good but driver isn't. You have bad capilar and possible brake rubber hose block brake fluid to capilar.
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Old 11-04-2012, 03:57 PM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee View Post
I reread this thread but not sure what you talk about.

Rear wheel need drum shoe adjust to apply little light enough to slow wheel when spin.

Front wheels you say passenger side stop good but driver isn't. You have bad capilar and possible brake rubber hose block brake fluid to capilar.
Thanks for reading, but maybe post #15 was not clear enough. In the test, the passenger side wheel stopped without braking, just freewheeling while the front end of the car sat on jack stands, rolling to a stop in neutral with the engine off starting at 30mph. Braking works normally. And the noise while driving does not seem to be the transmission, because it's not rpm-dependent. So it seems like it's in the half-axle assemblies somewhere, and the best suspect being the inboard or outboard "CV" joints on the passenger side. No?
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Last edited by California98Civic; 11-05-2012 at 12:16 AM.. Reason: typos, clarity
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Old 11-04-2012, 08:28 PM   #18 (permalink)
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the axle job is not all that difficult and the only special tool needed is a pinkel fork or two jaw puller for the lower control arm link as recall. I unbolt the caliper and swing it out of the way tie it with something ,leave the break hose connected. remove axle nut the rotor assy should swing out away from the axle, you may have to coax the axle loose (I use an old lead hammer and tap the end of the axle) then a large screwdriver or pry bar to help remove the axle from the trans. Check the haynes manual chapter 10 in mine shows a good view of the bottom and has some good pictures as a ref. Good luck
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Old 11-04-2012, 08:34 PM   #19 (permalink)
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I need to add this as well . I found one of the inner wheel bearing races bad (chattered)and that meant the bearing was also bad, grinding noise. Now-- that was a pita to replace
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Old 11-25-2012, 08:32 PM   #20 (permalink)
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The mystery continues

Both drive axles replaced today. Got both for a total $100 (core charge subtracted) with a lifetime warranty from Autozone. This is good preventative work since the CV boots were cracking and the passenger side was spitting-up CV grease through the cracks. And I found a dangerous bulge in the front right tire. But unfortunately CHANGING THE AXLES DID NOT SOLVE THE BEARING NOISE-LIKE PROBLEM.

Quote:
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I found one of the inner wheel bearing races bad (chattered)and that meant the bearing was also bad, grinding noise. Now-- that was a pita to replace
Maybe this is it? How might I test, if I can? I have eliminated front or read brake pad wear, wheels, tires, the CV joints, and the drive axles for sure as the source of the sound. I have probably eliminated the transmission itself, since the sound is neither engine RPM dependent nor gear dependent. It is wheel RPM dependent, getting faster or slower only with the wheel acceleration.

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